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My primary phone runs ...

Displaying poll results.
Android
  12946 votes / 44%
iOS
  6583 votes / 22%
Symbian
  1098 votes / 3%
WebOS
226 votes / 0%
Blackberry OS
  1104 votes / 3%
Other
  3005 votes / 10%
If my phone runs, I'll chase it down and kill it.
  4310 votes / 14%
29272 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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My primary phone runs ...

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  • Nothing. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nutria (679911) on Monday June 04, 2012 @05:02PM (#40213537)

    It's a land line.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Ah the good ol' days* when you had to stay at home in order to get a phone call.

      *bad ol' days

      • Re:Nothing. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anne_Nonymous (313852) on Friday June 08, 2012 @06:13PM (#40263301) Homepage Journal

        Ah the good ol' days* when you didn't wear an electronic leash everywhere you went.

        *no really

        • Ha! Only if you let it be!

      • by Nutria (679911)

        Ah the good old days when you didn't have to concern yourself with cell coverage dead spots (which our house happens to be).

        Besides, a land line is a *household* resource, which all members of the family, young and old, have access to.

        • Or perhaps the good old days when there was one phone in the house for everyone and I had three sisters and whenever one of them got a new boyfriend there would be repeated hour long phone calls every day - generally just when I was waiting for an important call.

          Then again it could be the good very old days when radio were valve technology and it took two minutes from turning it on to getting any sound and parental permission was required before making a phone call. Transistor radios did exist but they w
          • by Nutria (679911)

            repeated hour long phone calls every day - generally just when I was waiting for an important call.

            That's what texting is for... :)

            Anyway, why weren't your parents saying, "45 minute time limit!"

          • by Gutboy (587531)

            Or perhaps the good old days when there was one phone in the house for everyone and I had three sisters and whenever one of them got a new boyfriend there would be repeated hour long phone calls every day - generally just when I was waiting for an important call.

            Or the good old days when you answered the phone only when you heard your ring pattern, and you never knew if the neighbors were listening in on your calls.

            • by Kidbro (80868)

              Or the good old days when you answered the phone only when you heard your ring pattern, and you never knew if the neighbors were listening in on your calls.

              Yes, it's easier today when that niggling uncertainty is gone. Now we know that the government is listening in.

          • The good old days when the only internet access you had at home was dial-up and you had to fight with your sister whether her calling her boyfriend or me being able to check /. was more important. (This was back in 1998/1999.)

            Boy, do I not miss them.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by GIL_Dude (850471)

          Besides, a land line is a *household* resource, which all members of the family, young and old, have access to.

          It is interesting how the engineers at Google don't seem to understand that. I imagine none of them have home phones. For example, on Android, if you have two contacts that share a home phone (like say my Mom and Dad), if I choose the one that comes second on the contact list and have the phone call them - the picture and name for the one that comes alphabetically first in the contact list shows up

          • by Nutria (679911)

            Young, hip, childless geeks have different priorities than old, fogeyish, married-with-children geeks.

            The phone companies take a similar view as Google, though. It sure would be useful to (a) be able to share data xfer cap like we share minutes, and (b) have a common "family" cell phone number in addition to our personal numbers.

      • by tverbeek (457094)

        The good ol' days when all you had to do to get a phone call was to be at home. No worrying about signal strength, battery life, paying to take the call, straining to make out what the other person was saying....

        • by lxs (131946)

          Say what you will but I used to like hiking two towns over to the nearest telegraph office to receive electronic communications.

    • by raque (457836)

      When I saw primary phone I said IOS, but it's not my primary phone! My land line is! WOW, thanks for helping me think again. I feel so much more connected not my reality now. Which is so pathetic, because it's true.

    • by antdude (79039)

      Ditto. I don't own a mobile phone. I rarely go out too since I am disabled. I have Internet including dial-up as a backup. :)

    • Where I live, Southern California Edison has far too many unplanned power outages. Sometimes, there is only a flicker; sometimes, it lasts a few hours; once it lasted three days. No, we don't get blizzards or tornadoes. These outages are usually caused by underground transformers failing.

      A power outage can disable all local cell towers. It definitely disables the cable TV amplifiers that are also used for Internet and VoIP. However, land-line phone service has its own power source. When Edison fails,

    • by fa2k (881632)

      It's a land line.

      People who complain about website tracking probably carry a phone around all day and use a Visa or Mastercard to buy stuff. Land lines are good for not being tracked :)

  • Small correction (Score:5, Informative)

    by gmuslera (3436) * on Friday June 08, 2012 @06:24PM (#40263435) Homepage Journal
    my pocket computer with some mobile phone functionality runs Maemo.
  • While I'm seeing the benefits of having what now counts as a "smartphone" in my pocket, I'm not interested in any of the data plans yet, until I see something that's a plain pre-paid $/GB plan.

    Since I'm behind a computer most of the time, I expect to use it only in small bursts, and I'm fine without "always on me" net access so it's not a huge priority. Most of the prepaid data plans I've seen involve spending $10-20 for 24 hours of data access, which isn't a good fit.

    Anybody know of any fine-grained prepa

    • Re:Dumb phone (Score:5, Interesting)

      by ldobehardcore (1738858) <steven.dubois@gma i l . c om> on Sunday June 10, 2012 @01:17AM (#40272341)

      Regarding always on me net access: I can attest that I've had it for the last 7 years, and I'm 22 now, so about a third of my life.
      When I lose service I honestly feel like I've had a stroke or been lobotomized in my hippocampus. I use it so often to look up general info that I feel quite disconnected from my whole knowledge base.
      And I even did well in high school. Graduated w/ a 3.6 (w/ honors), and I'm great with trivia without the internet as long as it doesn't involve sports, history, or (shudder) sports history.

      But I feel like the internet is just another part of my mind. A place that I know that holds all the specific information, and instead of keeping it in my brain, I learn things once and they fade quickly if I don't use them. But I can always look up the info again in a few seconds if the need arises.

  • by Rogerborg (306625) on Friday June 08, 2012 @07:00PM (#40263817) Homepage

    And my phone makes phone calls. I think I can SND TXTS LOL; I'm not entirely sure.

    The youngsters I know who have "smart" "phones" seem to use them almost exclusively as games devices. I'm not entirely clear on why they pay so much every month for that functionality, rather than spending a lot less on a DS and a basic PAYG phone. Can anyone clue me in?

    • by rizole (666389)
      It's 'cus they're kids. Give them another 10 or 20 years and they'll know what to do with it. A genitive organ analogy is probably relevant here but if it will help you; I'll go with an automotive one.
    • My phone also makes phone calls, and occasionally it will also take a phone call.
    • I have a smart phone, and I don't play games on it.

      Top uses besides voice calls and texting (I have a limited text plan, but texting is useful when you or the other person is in a loud place, or for some reason you can't leave a voicemail): weather (I ride a motorcycle, so it's especially relevant to me), news, calendar and reminders, GPS and navigation, and quick checks of Google/Wikipedia. I also occasionally price check on Amazon when I'm in various stores.

      The camera is nice for documenting your parking

    • by ktappe (747125)

      The youngsters I know who have "smart" "phones" seem to use them almost exclusively as games devices. I'm not entirely clear on why they pay so much every month for that functionality, rather than spending a lot less on a DS and a basic PAYG phone. Can anyone clue me in?

      I know plenty of 40-, 50-, and 60-somethings who have iPhones. So to answer your question, we will need to know just how old you are.

    • by metlin (258108) on Saturday June 09, 2012 @12:21AM (#40266033) Journal

      Most people stopped thinking of phones as just devices for making "phone calls". These days, they're just mini-computers with pretty much everything on them.

      I've my work email, personal email, calendar, games, photos, camera, GPS, diary, ebook reader, media, and pretty much everything else on my phone. I count my calories very religiously, and I've an app that lets me scan what I eat, and watch my caloric and protein consumption. I have my company's VPN app installed, which lets me get on the company network. I can do my time & expense on my phone. My phone is my alarm clock, my timer, my emergency flashlight, and my calculator. It tells me the weather and the stock market. I shop on my phone, check-in for my flights on my phone, including the boarding passes. Going some place and one of us doesn't have cash? No worries, pull out your iSquare card reader on the phone and I can charge it in (carry one around in my bag at all times). Media? My music, movies, Netflix, YouTube are all on my phone. And of course, games. Everything from Angry Birds to Doom (yes, old school Doom).

      So, nobody thinks of a phone as a "smart phone" anymore. It's expected to do these things. The other "phones" you talk about are just kludgy leftover remnants from back in the day. I'm sure people complained about cars with stereos and air conditioning because they weren't just "taking them some place" like a good old horse buggy.

    • by sootman (158191)

      Top ten things I can't do with a DS and PAYG phone:
      - Maps, including GPS and satellite/aerial photography, which is some serious oh-my-God-I'm-living-in-the-future shit
      - Very good camera
      - Many options for taking notes, along with...
      - Good calendar/reminders/alarms
      - Weather
      - Wikipedia
      - Pretty much every other site on the Web
      - Bank
      - Good email
      - Literally almost anything else you can imagine [appstorm.net]

      Basically, it can probably do whatever's important to you. Guitar tuner, medical reference, advanced calculator... anythi

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      My smart phone lets me use those otherwise wasted periods when I have nothing better to do for catching up on reading or arguing on Slashdot. I also keep lots of notes and useful information on there and an encrypted password database that is incredibly useful.

      I use the maps and navigation functions a lot. No need to take a separate sat-nav in the car and it is useful for finding shops in unfamiliar towns. When I am abroad I use offline maps which are fantastically useful, as are apps that let me plan journ

    • you don't always need a data plan and you can be on PAYG as not every country has lousy mobile phone networks.

      In Ireland I pay 20 euro a month get free skype an extra 10 euro call credit free weekend calls(3000) minutes, 3000 texts for anytime and unlimited Internet Access.

      I paid 99 euro for a basic android phone but now it would cost 59 euro for the same model mostly it's other use is navigation but can do more it's bluetooth paired with my car radio so i get hands free as soon as I switch the car on and

  • Primary phone? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ubergeek65536 (862868) on Friday June 08, 2012 @07:11PM (#40263939)

    I don't have a phone, seriously. I used to have one but I hated people calling when I wanted no distractions. It was easier to tell people that I don't have a phone than to explain why it wasn't turned on.

    • by arth1 (260657)

      Same here. It was never a source of freedom, always a chain.
      Getting rid of the bone is one of the best thing I ever did. It sucked as a phone, sucked as a PDA, sucked at e-mail, sucked at games - not even mediocre quality of any of them. Yet it allowed people to think I was at their beck and (ehrm) call.

      Also, last year, along with a lot of people here in New England, we had an over a week long power outage. Cell phones didn't work because the towers didn't work (and you couldn't charge them either), int

      • Also, last year, along with a lot of people here in New England, we had an over a week long power outage. Cell phones didn't work because the towers didn't work (and you couldn't charge them either), internet phones didn't work, but guess what - old fashioned wired phone service did. There's something to be said for ground cables.

        Irene, right? We had similar outages here in New York. The problem was this...after a while, there were fewer and fewer people to call.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      I have an icon that enables flight mode in one click, and everyone knows that the signal in my area is really bad.

  • by snspdaarf (1314399) on Friday June 08, 2012 @07:21PM (#40264031)
    My primary phone is a Tracfone. It's an evil, bad tempered, pain in the ass, and I have no idea what it runs. It makes phone calls, unless I really, really need to make a call, and does SMS messages, except when the keys get stuck. I may have to hunt it down and kill it, as it just will not die, and I am too cheap to replace it unless I have to. But, when that glorious day comes, I will probably get an Android phone.
    • by istartedi (132515)

      Mine's a Nokia that's about 6 years old now. I marvel that the battery still holds a charge so well. The screen gets dust in it,and it's all scratched up from being dropped. In fact, I dropped it just a few days ago. It. just. won't. die.

      I too know that the day will come. BTW, it has the ability to take truly crappy pictures and video. I used the picture-taking a few times. It uses infrared transfer and it just so happens my laptop can pick it up (mini-USB cable was an option too; but I didn't wan

    • My primary phone is a Tracfone.

      Actually, my primary phone is a land-line, but I do have a Tracfone. I use it to make calls, and once in a while receive them. The alarm function is convenient when I need an alarm clock on the road, and the calculator comes in handy. I know it can do text messages, because I get them from Tracfone, but I've never seen the point of sending them, myself. I don't need to carry a miniture tablet computer around all the time, and when I do need a tablet, I've got a Nook.
  • I hear that these here smart phones make fer sum good eatin!
  • Blackberry (Score:2, Interesting)

    by blackbear (587044)

    I want to make calls, check my e-mail, and keep my schedule and contacts; in that order. My Blackberry does that exceptionally well.

    Everyone I know with iPhones and Androids tells me about all of the "cool stuff"(tm) their phones will do. The awesome apps, amazing games, and wasted time. Other times they tell me about the dropped calls, crashes, and reboots. They never talk about these things in the same conversation.

    I want a tool to communicate and make my job easier. I don't want a toy. Enjoy your toys if

    • by smash (1351)
      I've had 3 iPhones. I've never had an issue with dropped calls. I also make heavy use of maps, the camera, and the iPod.
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by mjwx (966435)

        I've had 3 iPhones. I've never had an issue with dropped calls. I also make heavy use of maps, the camera, and the iPod.

        I've had six Iphones, all given to me to repair by people who claim Iphones do anything wrong, all of them dead.

    • A stock iphone without a ton of poorly written fartapps on it is as robust and stable as your BB. Dont kid yourself.
      • by blackbear (587044)

        > A stock iphone without a ton of poorly written fartapps on it is as robust and stable as your BB.

        That's true. In addition to that, the iphone does about twice as many things out of the box as BB.

        The problem is that my friends with iphones complain of ending the call early and other unintentional actions because of the damned touch screen. Most of them also complain of poor interface design (functionality not appearance) preventing them from working as efficiently.

        I'm glad to hear that it's working well

        • by Stele (9443)

          Most of them also complain of poor interface design (functionality not appearance) preventing them from working as efficiently.

          They must be holding it wrong.

  • by ktappe (747125) on Friday June 08, 2012 @11:45PM (#40265767)
    I'm rather surprised by the results. It's no exaggeration that 9 out of 10 smartphone users I know use iPhones. Androids are rare (though not unheard of). Interested in thoughts as to how there can be such a stark difference between this poll & what I'm seeing IRL.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 09, 2012 @12:45AM (#40266143)

      People with like interests gravitate to one another. Most of your friends probably don't know many android users either.
      Most android users only know a few lonely iphone users. It works both ways.
      And even fewer of us know anyone still using a blackberry unless their company bought it for them.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 09, 2012 @03:11AM (#40266683)

      You're probably in the US (or UK). Simple as that. Android overtook iPhone outide the US in 2011. Apple has very little market presence outside of english speaking coutries (which is why english language tech sites, like Slashdot, seem to non-english speakers to be hopelessly fixated on irrelevant little Apple ;-).

      If you want to see how Android compares with Apple in real global market share, try a site like menea.me. Right now they have no Apple articles on the front page, 2 for Samsung, and 3 for Google. There was a world-war, Apple lost. The US missed it.

      • by gman003 (1693318)

        There was a world-war ... The US missed it.

        Dammit, not again. We swore after the last two that we'd never show up late to another war...

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Saturday June 09, 2012 @12:45PM (#40268957) Homepage

      Simple, you personal experience is no indication of a general trend and the same is true for almost all situations. Just look at the Android vs. iPhone sales figures and it should be obvious that there are far, far more Android phones in circulation now. No wonder because ignoring the relative merits of the two platforms for a moment Android simply covers more of the market. The cheapest phones available for free on £10/month contracts run Android where has you have to pay a fair bit more to get an iPhone, so for anyone who doesn't want to spend a lot the latter isn't even an option.

    • by romiz (757548)
      Apple is not as popular in other countries as it is in the US. It is very popular, but it is not reaching the levels seen in the US, where the iPod was practically the single MP3 player sold in significant numbers in the country.

      As a result, the international composition of the Slashdot readership will probably tilt the view towards other players, especially if you're comparing with your surroundings.
    • by jejones (115979)

      Pauline Kael? Is that you? :) (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauline_Kael#Alleged_Nixon_quote [wikipedia.org])

  • Noone has mentioned it yet: Harmattan on Nokia N9.
    Fantastic OS on a fantastic phone.

    • I wish I could upgrade to the n9.
      But it has too many problems, the main ones being no keyboard and a capacitive touch screen with no stylus.

      Also I rather prefer GTK--based Maemo to Hartman...QT is cool, but I feel that GTK/Gnome-related things are more in touch with the community of the underlying layers, while QT seems to distance itself. At least Hartman was still dpkg...

  • My primary phone (the one I give out to people who ask for my number) is a land line.
    I do have a cell phone, but its an old dumb cellphone I use to make calls when I am out.
    If I am not home there is usually someone that is, plus an answerphone.

    BTW I do have an Android device - its a 10 inch Tablet, not a phone, it only has wifi .

  • What no Windows option? Oh wait, this is Slashdot. Nobody here's going to be running Windows Phone or Windows Mobile .

    • by 1s44c (552956)

      What no Windows option? Oh wait, this is Slashdot. Nobody here's going to be running Windows Phone or Windows Mobile .

      Oh wait, this is the world. Nobody here's going to be running Windows Phone.

      If people who work in phone shops tell customers not to buy Windows Phones very few of them are going to get sold. I don't think I know a single person with a windows phone.

      • I've seen one in the subway the other day...first and last encounter so far...
        • by cbhacking (979169)

          Probably a lot more Windows Phone uses than WebOS users, though. Granted, I live in Seattle (close to Microsoft) so I'm sure this is heavily skewed, but even in their heyday I hardly saw any WebOS phones, while on any given random bus ride and sometimes just in the elevator (of a building with no MS offices) I'll usually see a Windows phone some time during the day.

  • Whatever OS runs on the Samsung B2710. It makes and receives phone calls, can send and receive SMS messages, and it can run J2ME applications (the only one I use is a OATH-compliant OTP generator). I like it that way as it follows the unix philosophy of doing one thing (being a basic phone) and doing it well.

  • Maemo - Nokia N900 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Zarhan (415465) on Saturday June 09, 2012 @06:59AM (#40267261)

    Still have my N900. It has it's flaws, but unfortunately there is no real replacement. The repositories are full of interesting software, I can run even stuff like Wireshark and the like (which is kind of nice when you are a network engineer and occasionally need to debug stuff over mobile network).

    N9 has no keyboard, and is pretty much a dead end since Meego is pretty much dead with Nokia going the way of Windows Mobile.

    Anyway, one day the hardware is probably going to die - is there *any* phone that would come even close? With Android I need to pretty much tie myself to a google account - sure, I can root Android phone but then I pretty much have to start scaveging the net for software. It's been pointed to me that there are several alternates to Android market, but no one bothers to list examples.

    From what I've seen on my wife's phone about software for Android - it looks like *everything* is adware. For Maemo everything seems to be based on common open source software. I can run stuff like Stellarium, Ur-Quan Masters, ScummVM, AbiWord, Gnumeric and stuff like that...Heck, N900 was the first phone where I could get IPSec VPN to work properly - I can just get the normal openVPN up and running. Oh, and sharing your 3G net connection over WLAN works too - there's of course Joikuspot, but for other systems it costs money, with N900 I could just set up ethernet bridging + ad-hoc WLAN like with a common Linux box.

    It looks like I could get most of these functionalities on an Android phone, but I'd have to find ad-loaded alternatives, tie the phone to a Google account - including having to sync phonebook and calendar with Google...kinda feels like step backwards.

    • The N900 hardware item likely to die first is the micro-USB port, which eventually cracks loose from its internal mount and leaves you with no means of USB-based recharging or file transfer. Mine is already showing the symptoms after a few years of use, so I'll soon be having to charge the battery by swapping it into another phone. File transfers will still be possible by WiFi, microSD card, and/or Bluetooth.

      As for Maemo5, only the occasional third party app gets updated anymore but I find most of the other

    • by Aggrajag (716041)
      N950 if you can get your hands on one. I couldn't find one and settled for N9.
  • my phone has a cord and a rotary dial, you insensitive clod!

  • I have a windows phone, HTC Radar. Company picked it for me but I rather like it, actually. Would really like a 7 or 10" version of this HTC phone but I read somewhere they won't build such a thing. Let's see if the other 6 people who have WP7 also read slashdot. Judging from my train commute, there's about 30:1 between iPhones and Windows...

  • by Lord Lode (1290856) on Saturday June 09, 2012 @01:16PM (#40269121)

    If I open my phone, I find some copper wires and coils, a rotating dialer mechanism, a bell, some magnets, and some carbon microphone and speaker. I have no idea what OS is running on this! Anyone know?

    • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Saturday June 09, 2012 @06:28PM (#40270743)

      If I open my phone, I find some copper wires and coils, a rotating dialer mechanism, a bell, some magnets, and some carbon microphone and speaker. I have no idea what OS is running on this! Anyone know?

      Sounds like it was made by Bell, so the OS must be Plan 9. The numbers on the face only go up to 9, right?

    • by rubycodez (864176)

      the OS for that thing is in the cloud, probably a Bell Labs variant of Unix tailored for phone switching

  • What OS? We have PAYG dumbphones, not out of Ludditeness, but simply time, need, and cost.
    At work, no cell phone, smart or dumb. No exceptions, no excuses, can't bring it into the building (or camera, mp3 player, etc). If anyone needs to get me at work, email or the phone on my desk.
    We don't go out a whole lot, so no need for that level of access when 'away from home'. The cell is used maybe a minute every 2 or 3 days ("Can you bring home milk? OK")

    The wife talks a LOT on the phone at home, so the landli
  • I've been using smartphones for years. First Windows Mobile, then Android and now IOS. In the PDA world it was PalmOS then Windows CE.

    I love Android! I could tweak and mod to my heart's content and it is deeply in bed with the Google services I use. I love that I'm not limited to curated apps from one source. The fact that I could write an app and load it on my phone without getting someone's permission (and paying $99 a year to be part of a developer network) was great.

    My biggest complaint about Andro

  • by The Archon V2.0 (782634) on Saturday June 09, 2012 @05:16PM (#40270309)

    My primary phone runs right to the wall where the jack plugs in.

    My cell phone runs whatever the hell a non-smartphone that's over 5 years old would run.

    My lawn runs around my house. Get off it.

  • by cllb21 (1884014) on Sunday June 10, 2012 @12:20AM (#40272191)
    ...how smartphone users see other smartphone users??? [csectioncomics.com] (Personally most iPhone users that I've met are like the one at the top right, no offense. I have an Android)
  • by FrankNFurter (89904) <fpbeckerNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Sunday June 10, 2012 @07:00AM (#40273241) Homepage

    WebOS - for all intents and purposes a dead platform - has its own poll option, but Windows Phone 7.x doesn't? That's just ridiculous.

  • by wonkavader (605434) on Sunday June 10, 2012 @03:34PM (#40276931)

    I had a blackberry. I hated it. So when my company offered me a either a new blackberry or an iPhone, I took the iPhone.

    I REALLY hate it. It's better than the Blackberry in some ways, but that was really aiming low.

    I'd like the chance to use an Android phone for a week or two. I'm reluctant to spend money on it, though, because I suspect I know how it's going to turn out.

    A smartphone should be first and foremost a good phone. Your cheek shouldn't hang up on people. Pocket dialing should be almost impossible even if you forget to lock it. It should have buttons you can always find, even when you're not looking at it. It should have good voice recognition without being annoying.

    Then it should give you the ability to run little apps and it should be easy to move data from one app to another. It should make it easy for you to select text and paste it somewhere else. (Actually easy, not just "way better than a Blackberry but still a colossal pain in the butt compared to a mouse-based system".)

    Haven't played with WebOS or had enough time with a modern version of Android. Here's to hoping.

    But I suspect I won't really like anything until I have a glasses-based system, with a MUCH bigger theoretical screen (when you interact with the virtual image 2 feet from your head) and good, constant voice rec. It should have a little mute button right on the side of the glasses, along with a little sleep button.

    My wife uses a dumb phone, with number buttons. If I could use only that, I know I'd miss stuff I have using iPhone, but on some levels it'd be less agravating.

    Here's my big annoyance with it all, really. You know how Charlie Brown sticks his tongue out when he's writing or drawing? Kids do that. Adults even do that sometimes. I know it's weird, but it's a human behavior thing. I have the urge to do that when I'm just trying to select something or hit a button on an iPhone. Because just selecting text is fine-detail work on these little things. That shouldn't happen. It should be easy to convey your desires to the device. That way, you can concentrate on what you want to do, not on the mechanics of doing it.

Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves. -- Lazarus Long

 



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