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Microsoft to Hire Xbox Hackers? 360

Posted by michael
from the bare-metal dept.
handsomepete writes "According to PlanetXbox, Microsoft is looking to hire 'software design engineers' to look into the properties of modchips and detection code for hardware. A background in game hacking knowledge is listed as a preferred talent. Will any of the Xbox Linux participants take a stab at this job?"
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Microsoft to Hire Xbox Hackers?

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:21PM (#4218148)
    It probably says something about the employee being neutered and lobotomized on page 16 paragraph 9f.
  • I would assume (Score:4, Interesting)

    by The Electric Messiah (591306) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:22PM (#4218151)
    that any employment contract would forbid them from working on any of the XBox projects out there already, such as the XBox Linux Project, or from even disseminating any information they learn whatsoever. Maybe MS is trying to gut these projects before anything else is accomplished?
    • by Faust7 (314817)
      I don't think Microsoft is too concerned about the Xbox Linux Project. :)
      • by ramdac (302865) <ramdac [at] ramdac.org> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:46PM (#4218555) Homepage Journal
        You're crazy.

      • by jsse (254124)
        In my opinion they're concerned. XBox is kinda a pilot for future DRM implementation. In fact they could really gain experience from XBox Linux Project to improve DRM...
      • by warmcat (3545) on Monday September 09, 2002 @12:37AM (#4218685)
        This is evidently the case, as no one working on the project has had any approach from MS so far.

        I think they see it as some distance away from the center of gravity of their customer base, which is mostly pimply -> wrinkly twitchers. Plus they probably rightly see that actually very few of their customers overall will ever get a modchip that is necessary to run it.. 1%-5% something like that.

        However the other week Michael Steil, the project lead had Open Office up. That really made me think, with a little more maturity and slickness, quickly and easily booting into being able to run Mozilla, Mplayer, Office apps, all from a free CD and a $10 USB keyboard could potentially give MS nightmares from several angles. What's needed now is a) to still work with the new 'secure' version that's in the pipeline, and b) preferably some way to get control of the machine without a modchip.

        On the job offer, most of the folks working on the project are in the EU, and several (although not necessarily all) do not find themselves philisophically aligned with the aims of MS. But if anyone wants to join them, I'd wish them good luck against the modchip manufacturers, they'll need it. I think that kind of job could be interesting, but if they day dawns that you 'win', the excitement fades, the scales fall from your eyes and you look around at the smoking ruins you have caused.
    • maybe, but I would think that if these people went to MS someone else would take their place, MS doesn't hoard *all* the smart people of the world.

      I would say they are trying to make their hardware harder to crack and software harder to copy and/or emulate (especially being that it is on PC hardware).

      They aren't the completely evil company so many of you think.

      Well maybe they are but still ;)
    • Do what I did. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by SHEENmaster (581283) <travis@utk.eNETBSDdu minus bsd> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:54PM (#4218425) Homepage Journal
      When I got my first job last summer, I flat out refused to sign anything but the paper giving them the right to deposit my paycheck.

      I still got the job. I doubt M$ would accept that.

      Try signing John Doe to those documents, see if anyone notices.
      • by cruelworld (21187) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:37PM (#4218531)
        Yeah, but Burger King isn't too strict with those NDA's

      • Re:Do what I did. (Score:4, Informative)

        by ChaosDiscordSimple (41155) on Monday September 09, 2002 @11:45AM (#4221057) Homepage
        Refusing to sign documents can work pretty well. I never signed the employment agreement at my last job because they repeated failed to get me the changes they promised. ("Hey, Alan, could you sign the employment agreement?" "Sure, as soon as you get me a revised agreement per our verbal agreement when I accepted the position." "Oh, sure, I'll have that soon." Repeat every four months until I left.) A similar technique worked for a friend.

        However, signing a false name to the documents (John Doe), is pretty clearly fraud and could get you in trouble if the company pressed the issue in court. Don't do it.

  • by Powercntrl (458442) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:24PM (#4218160)
    The Xbox is really just the pilot program for palladium. Once all the security holes are patched, Microsoft will then use what they've learned (after patenting it, of course) to create the most difficult-to-hack DRM PC standard.

    Let's just hope sellout hackers aren't as good as not-for-profit hackers.
    • When I first read the above message, I thought it was just fluff, but if you think about it... the X-Box does a lot of what Palladium is described as.

      At the very least, I would be amazed if Palladium development did not carefully scrutinize successes and failures of the X-Box model.

    • No! Stop!
      It's a cookbook [cox.net]! It's a cookbook [sideshowtoy.com]!! It's a [mrrrffph]

    • Even better, they should come up with the new system, find its weaknesses, and patent all the mechanisms they can think of for attacking the weaknesses. That way, they would be able to knock down the modchip makers based on patent infringement rather than the DMCA, which might be overturned or ruled unconstitutional. Not to mention that the DMCA is a U.S. law, but patent protection is shared by much of the world.

  • by Lieutenant_Dan (583843) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:25PM (#4218163) Homepage Journal
    As soon as someone provides something innovative to the community, there goes MS buying up all the talent so that they die a quiet death in one of the gray offices in Redmond.

    When will they finally see that the best way to improve MS is to allow the Open Source developer community free rein in order to come out with more and more brilliant ideas and concepts?

    • When will they finally see that the best way to improve MS is to allow the Open Source developer community free rein in order to come out with more and more brilliant ideas and concepts?

      How the hell will this improve MS?? Their goal is total domination of all computer software; basically to collect a toll for anything and everything that someone does on a computer, and that requires monopoly control. How will disseminating new ideas and allowing free competition help that? MS isn't trying to help computing in general, or to make computing better for the users, they just want to have rigid control of it so they can make money.
    • I've got to take issue with this. Whenever someone does something really interesting with a company's product (like the N64 emulator for example) and the "offended" company sics their lawyers on the hackers, isn't the mantra we all chant usually "hire them, don't sue them!" Frankly, I see this as Microsoft wising up a bit. They see people out there taking their base product and doing some pretty neat stuff with them. Rather than wipe them off the face of the Earth, maybe they're seeing this as an opportunity to deepen their talent pool with some people who truly do think "outside the box." Or inside the Xbox as the case may be. I fail to see why MS looking to hire these people as a bad thing...

      Chris
  • by TACD (514008) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:27PM (#4218169) Homepage
    Which will be larger... the XBox, or the hackers hired to break it?
  • by MattC413 (248620) <MattC413NO@SPAMhotmail.com> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:29PM (#4218175)
    Ackbar: "It's a trap!"

    -Matt
  • no thanks. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Naikrovek (667) <jjohnson.psg@com> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:30PM (#4218176)
    Will any of the Xbox Linux participants take a stab at this job?

    Why? So they can be part of the winning team that kills modchips forever?

    no thanks.
    • Don't be too sure. Jobs are not easily found out there now, and the money is probably good.

      There are always sell outs out there. They have people that wrote code that tries to track down P2P file swappers. I'm sure there are more than a few out there that are just chomping at the bit to help implement the USA-Wide identity card stuff. When you gotta eat, and you're tired of living in a cardboard box, principles go right out the window.

      • Re:no thanks. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Naikrovek (667) <jjohnson.psg@com> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:49PM (#4218225)
        When you gotta eat, and you're sick of the cardboard box, you don't abandon your morals for cash. you do everything in your power to live as good of a life as you can without throwing your morals out the window.

        That's what morals are. The world is what we make it, pal, if you're so quick to do the wrong thing for a quick buck, then you go do that. I'm going to keep my spine and do what's necessary to live with myself & sleep at night.

        I'm doing my part to make the world a place less driven by the dollars, and driven more by intelligence. Can you say that you're doing the same?

        Money is a tool, and nothing more. It is to help you get out of the gutter & put you in a comfortable place and be able to provide for your children. It is NOT incentive to abandon your judgement.
        • Even if you think modchips are a Good Thing, that doesn't mean you should take a job at Microsoft creating DRM stuff.

          Why not enjoy the sport of it and let the best hacker win. That's what it's all about, isn't it? Not about turning down perfectly good dollars so that technology can stay "easy" to mod.

        • Yeah, that all works fine for the college kid who likes to gloat over his SourceForge community project.

          While I didn't mean that *I* would throw my morals out the window for a buck, it is certainly a fact that your ideal world where everyone sticks to their guns is a fantasy. I've seen far too many 20ish people have the same attitude as you, and I'm as guilty as anyone is. When you decide that you're sick of seeing this know-nothings drive the nice cars while you're deciding if you want to pay rent or fix yours, or possibly just fricking sick and tired of living with five other roomates to be able to afford rent, your morals will disappear too.

          Then try raising a family. You don't have the luxury of morals when you have children crying themselves to sleep because they are hungry. I'd stick a knife in the next person if it meant the difference between feeding my family and upholding my morals, and I don't apologize for it.

          • Re:no thanks. (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Jonathunder (105885) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:36PM (#4218369) Homepage
            "Then try raising a family. You don't have the luxury of morals when you have children crying themselves to sleep because they are hungry. I'd stick a knife in the next person if it meant the difference between feeding my family and upholding my morals, and I don't apologize for it."

            Especially when raising children, morals are not a luxury.

            I hate preaching, so let me be plain. If you mean the last sentence about sticking a knife if that's what it takes, please don't breed.
          • Re:no thanks. (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Doomdark (136619)
            Um, actually I think you are confusing "moral" with "ideals" here. According to your moral code (ethics), it is not only ok, but probably even the right thing to do, to kill someone instead of letting your kin to starve (from your last example). You wouldn't be losing your moral values. You would be doing moral judgment based on your moral code. Ideally, of course, you'd prefer not to kill anyone, but in this case you have to choose the lesser of evil, using whatever moral system you have.

            Same applies to most other examples. Keep in mind that there's no single universal moral code, nor are moral codes absolute.

            Of course there is the difference between survival (starving vs. working for evil masters), and simpler priorization between "right" and "convenient"... but I felt poster tried to make the point of at least considering why people do the things that are against their ideals, not to claim everyone always does what they thought is the right to do, no matter what.

          • Then try raising a family. You don't have the luxury of morals when you have children crying themselves to sleep because they are hungry. I'd stick a knife in the next person if it meant the difference between feeding my family and upholding my morals, and I don't apologize for it.

            Solution: kill yourself and your spouse if you have any. Then your kids will be orphans, and whatever food they will get in an orphanage will be far better than whatever you will get them by killing a random person.

            And if your situation is not as desperate to do that it's quite natural to hold you to the same moral standards as the rest of humankind.

          • If you really mean that about sticking a knife in someone to feed your children, then you are a horrible parent. It is your job to teach your children to grow up to be decent people; sticking knives in people to feed them is just going to turn them into the fucking losers you see on Jerry Springer and Cops.

            Please, for the sake of everything that is still good and decent in the world, DO NOT BREED!

        • Re:no thanks. (Score:2, Insightful)

          by jackbang (572339)

          Who says that someone has to abandon their morals in order to take on that job? Maybe it would violate your morals, and maybe it would violate mine too. But surely there is a damned good coder out there who loves working on security issues who also happens to think that DRM is a good idea and that businesses have a right to protect and control their proprietary systems.

          Why is it that good programmers are automatically equated (at least on Slashdot) with rabidly anti-Microsoft anti-business anti-patent viewpoints? There are brilliant people on both sides of the fence. All you can really conclude is that Slashdot is not the place to post a help wanted ad for that particular job.

    • maybe they want to work for one of the worlds biggest software companies and make a good salary? Have you checked the job market lately? Nobody with half a brain would turn down a job offer like this.
    • Re:no thanks. (Score:2, Insightful)

      by markw365 (185614)
      Heh, you don't have kids that destroy games. If everytime your kid scratched up a cd and you had to buy a new one, you'd be modchipping everything you had.
  • by Alien54 (180860) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:31PM (#4218181) Journal
    Almost sounds like Satan putting up a Help Wanted advertisement, looking to recruit more staff for the circles of hell

    [I cam sure that others could cook up something like this, a poster or something, with far greater finesse than this quick effort]

    • "Tired of Creative Freedom?"
    • "enjoy screwing with the minds of others?"
    • "do you take sadistic pleasure in your work?"

      Then You may qualify to Become a Minion for his Satanic Majesty today

  • by mikeee (137160) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:33PM (#4218188)
    1. Begin work on Linux for XBox.
    2. Get hired for high-paying, do-nothing job at Microsoft.
    3. Profit!

    It's the accordian minstral theory (if you tip him, he'll go away...)
  • Since anyone working on XBox Linux with genuine credentials can already get a job (and anyone who just has 5ki115 wouldn't show up on MS radar,) and, just so you know, I've detected a distinct undercurrent of anti MS hostility among the dedicated linux devel crowd, but maybe it's just me. Of course, there's a little cognitive dissonance in being anti-MS and working on MS hardware - economics aside, it is a mindshare thing.

    I was prepared to complain about pointlessly villifying MS, but reading the job description it really looks like they want to hire someone to nip modchipping in the bud.
  • by rob-fu (564277) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:38PM (#4218202)
    from the job application...

    1. Do you have expertise with modification chips?

    2. If so, do you know other people who have your level of expertise with these chips?

    3. If you answered yes to number 3, provide the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and email addresses of all of these people. We're interested in prosecuting^H^H^H^H^H contacting them.

    What better way to beat the mod chip makers then to recruit them.
  • BS Required (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Nintendork (411169) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @09:43PM (#4218210) Homepage
    "BS in Computer Science or Computer Engineering required."

    There's hacking classes in college? Somebody needs to smack the entire H.R. dept. for weeding out a lot of talented folks.

    -Lucas
    • There's hacking classes in college? Somebody needs to smack the entire H.R. dept. for weeding out a lot of talented folks.

      I distinctly remember taking a Linux kernel hacking class [gatech.edu] when I was in college which amongst other things included hacking Linux on the iPaq. I also seem to remember that one of my group members was in a video game class at the same time which included projects such as hack Quake I [gatech.edu].
    • by BlueGecko (109058) <(benjamin.pollack) (at) (gmail.com)> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:32PM (#4218363) Homepage
      It's OK. All they're requiring is that you have said some BS about software and hardware. I'd think any of us could do that.

      Or is that not what they meant?
    • Simple explanation, tons of CS departments around the country brai MS is the greatest! nwash their students into being friends of MS.
    • Re:BS Required (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Jerf (17166) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:16PM (#4218471) Journal
      To give a serious answer, this sort of job would really benefit from a good grasp of formal methods and provability of correctness, along with a firm grasp of the theoretical underpinnings of security beyond just practical experience cracking it; you can crack things all your life and still be only marginally more competent to create a good system yourself then the next programmer. (Indeed, you may suffer for the exposure to so many bad examples.)

      Of course you might learn all of this outside of school... but the same people who sneer at school tend to sneer at this level of understanding and also seem to think that computer science == programming. Requiring a degree is one step towards weeding those folks out. (Remember that weeding a person out is not free from a business perspective, so it literally pays to have such easy criteria to filter on.) It also demonstrates a certain minimal facility with working with this sort of rigor, which is one of the greatest glaring weaknesses in the most self-taught computer scientists^W programmers.

      Given the background necessary to really do a good job, I'm kinda surprised they aren't requiring a Masters or PhD in related speciality. Perhaps that would narrow the market too much.
    • by prockcore (543967) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:33PM (#4218522)
      The ironic thing is that up until a few years ago, Bill Gates himself wouldn't qualify for that job, since he dropped out.
    • Sure they do, I bet every university out there has a course on practical computer security. Should be, at least. My university's [www.hut.fi] is here [tml.hut.fi], probably not very interesting though since it's in Finnish. Basically first you choose a topic which can be from cracking DES to hijacking TCP session to hacking into WWW/FTP/DNS/NFS server. Then you make a written plan then you do the hack (within the lab network :) and then you get a grade.
    • If you're unwilling to put in the time and effort to learn all about computer science, even the hard parts you hoped to avoid by just getting a job out of high school, then you honestly aren't worth hiring.

      Think about it. You are an employer, you see 10 people. 8 of them have degrees, maybe 4 of those are masters, and one of those is a Phd. Do you even consider the lamer just out of high school who doesn't have the work ethic or dedication to even do university? Do you think that lamer will be able to actually meet deadlines?

      Plus you're forgoing all you'll ever learn in university, be it from a book, from a prof, or from another student. That's years of life experience you say to your potential employer that you don't want.

      Really, for a group of people who like to talk down about stupid people and ignorance, a lot of geeks seem to just want to skip the hard part where they have to learn because they can't coast anymore. That's a disgusting attitude to have towards knowledge.
  • by Farrax (83670)
    Turbine Entertainment, who make Asheron's Call (Microsoft's MMORPG offering), have been hiring the people who hack it for quite some time now. Turns out if you are able to hack the system, sometimes you're a bigger expert on it than the people who made it!

    (No joke... Todd Berkbile, AC's lead systems programmer now, came from "Todd's Hacking Zone" -- and he's modified some core systems that his predecessors were scared to touch due to flammability.)
  • Unnamed Patron (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Perdo (151843) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:12PM (#4218310) Homepage Journal
    Perhaps the unnamed patron of the Linux X Box project is microsoft itself. They have been known to have an odd way of conducting job interview, this being an interview process similar to Halflife's.

  • If you can't beat them,

    Hire them.
  • Is that were in an economic depression. One thing is for sure - if I was into xbox hacking and I had a CS degree (I don't - I was a social studies major) I would be applying. Judging by the last job fair (where it reminded me of getting into a insanely popular night club) here in Portland I think there's going to be a lot of CS/Engineer people applying too.

    This is doubly so if you live in Oregon, Washington or California - where unemployment is still 1st, 2nd and 3rd highest in the nation respectively.

    I mean its either that or going to work for stream international :).
  • by We're All Alike (607138) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:24PM (#4218342)
    Dear Microsoft:

    I am fully qualified for the position you have listed. In fact, I may be one of the most qualified applicants around. I have been hacking copy protect mechanisms since I was 7. I have something to tell you. You have heard this before from people just like me, but you have not listened.

    You do not seem to realize that what you are doing, in your attempts to introduce completely 'trusted' computers, is evil. I'm not referring to your usual misguided 'save the world by taking it over' style of evil, I'm talking more of a killing kittens for fun kind of evil. You are, whether it is your intention or not, going to remove general purpose computing from the hands of the non-experts, and they won't know enough to stop you. Depending on your success I forsee one of two final results. The likeliest option is that you go out of business in 80 years, because your 'innovations' stunt the technological development of an entire generation and alienate those few who are intelligent enough to have become programmers anyways. In this case, you will set back humanity's development by hundreds of years. Or, alternately, you drive your existing user base to other platforms and go out of business in 5 years. I doubt you will allow the second option to happen.

    I have not participated in the efforts to hack your hardware (XBox) previously because I did not want to support you by purchasing one. Now, I see the light. I, with the help of other slashdotters, have realized that the XBox is just a test run of your trusted computing initiatives. It is a chance for you to find the bugs in your system and fix them on a platform which attracts hackers, yet presents no serious loss when it is hacked. I have no doubt in my mind that if you manage to perfect this architecture you will waste no time in implementing it in desktop PCs and using your monopoly power to force a significant number of users over to it.

    Therefore, this is my notice to you. I will not let you succeed. I am qualified for your position, but I will not be applying. I will be adding my intelligence to the effort to stop you, and I will succeed. And if I do not, it does not matter. Because I am not alone. You may stop this individual, but you can't stop us all. [hackers.com] And, in the end, you will lose. I promise.

    -JM
    101010

    (Posted anonymously because Microsoft's lawyers are more expensive than mine.)

  • by WildBeast (189336) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @10:49PM (#4218409) Journal
    Unlike many other companies who would have sued those people. MS chose to deal with them. You can at least give them that
  • Has anyone thought of taking these jobs and deliberately doing a really crap job? Do it so poorly that they never succeed ;)

    I wonder if anyone is a sick and twisted as me.
    In Australia at the moment they have jobs going for "anti linux and anti SUN" people. The job advertisments specifically mention limiting the growth of linux and solaris in the "responsibilities" section of the job description.

    get the job, take the cash, and then go around promoting linux on Microsoft's money ;)
  • by Dimensio (311070) <.moc.uolgi. .ta. .ratskrad.> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:25PM (#4218504)
    A number of games in Japan (and even a few in the US) included 'modchip detection' code that would prevent the game from working on Playstation consoles with modchips installed. Of course, the "protection" could be easily bypassed with either a Gameshark (or similar device) or with a crack applied to a CD image of the game. The result was that gamers who used modchips solely to play legally purchased imports were out of luck while the pirates could continue on without problems. Might have even pushed a few to the 'dark side'.

    I suspect that any modchip detection code in the XBox will have a similar effect.

  • "How is the hacker extermination plan going ?"
    "As soon as we've rounded up the most desperate
    and the geediest, we'll suck their brains out
    and present them to your Filthyness in a cocktail
    glass with novelty umbrella!"
    "Good. Proceed."

    "Right, saw right throught that ceiling and
    nail their asses !!
    Make sure someone signs a receipt before leaving !"

    "oooh those live pictures of those free
    thinkers getting busted had me soil my
    StayDrys I was so excited!!!"
  • by DarkHelmet (120004) <[mark] [at] [seventhcycle.net]> on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:39PM (#4218540) Homepage
    A background in game hacking knowledge is listed as a preferred talent

    Can I take my Game Genie to the interview?

  • Why take this job? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by m00nun1t (588082)
    Fortune Magazine [fortune.com] lists Microsoft as one of the best companies in the world to work for.
    • It's a cult. Everyone there loves it soooooooo much and wants to share it with you. They're smart, articulate, and scary.

      When I interviewed there a couple of years ago, I noticed fairly that there is a largish Scientology outpost right on the campus. That and the "contagious enthusiasm" vibe that was coming off everybody weirded me out sufficiently that I didn't want to work there.

      That said, there have definitely been concrete reasons to work there these past 20 years or so. As long as Microsoft keeps its thumb firmly on software users, its employees will have plenty of cash and benefits, nice buildings, and fascinating co-workers.

      • Yeah, right, it's a cult. Dissenters are killed on sight.

        Take a look at this map [mapquest.com] The Church of Scientology is on the corner of Bel-Red and 24th. The land in between is owned by a hospital (not affiliated with Microsoft.)

        Need a conspiracy theory? Just south of 24th is Uwajimaya, the local Japanese grocery store. That can only mean one thing: Yes, Sony bought Microsoft! That's why they need modchips for the X-Box--they're turning it into the PS3!

  • by Windcatcher (566458) on Sunday September 08, 2002 @11:54PM (#4218575)
    I read this somewhere before, and perhaps it bears restating. Maybe we need to set up a web site with a Hippocratic Oath of sorts for things we WILL NOT DO, like creating software and standards that take away freedoms. Perhaps a "Hall of Shame" as well for those who break the oath?
    • "Maybe we need to set up a web site with a Hippocratic Oath of sorts for things we WILL NOT DO,"

      Just like the Hippocratic oath that states that the person taking it will not perform abortions ? That really stops them.

      I'm not pro or con abortion- it's just interesting to note that it should be called the Hypocritic oath.

      graspee


      • Please indicate where abortion is mentioned in the modern hippocratic oath [pbs.org]. Lots of things are said about the oath by people who have never read it, let alone understand it. Please don't fall into that trap.
        • "Please don't fall into that trap."

          But I like falling into traps! One of my favorites is falling into the trap of believing that my insurance covers me against attack by lemurs.

          Also of course, with this reply, I have fallen into the trap of using stupid surreal humour in an attempt to get out of a situation where I showed my ignorance...

          graspee


          • hehehehe :)

            Are you sure you're not covered for the lemurs? I think I saw a clause somewhere in mine for that. Of course, if they're lesser-spotted brown-nose lemurs then all bets are off.
  • Is like fucking for virginity.
  • by lpontiac (173839) on Monday September 09, 2002 @12:18AM (#4218628)
    In an interview several years ago in boot magazine:

    "This is my view of the people who work at Microsoft: You have a choice. You have to realize that what you're doing is bad for the industry. If you're doing stuff that you don't even agree with and do it for the money- we have a word for that: Whore."
  • by Anonymous Canard (594978) on Monday September 09, 2002 @12:28AM (#4218654)
    Epoxy.

    You will be receiving a bill for my services shortly.

  • "Buy 'em out, boys!" -- Bill Gates on The Simpsons
  • by Kredal (566494)
    Keep your friends close, and your enemies... on the payroll!
  • by miffo.swe (547642) <daniel,hedblom&gmail,com> on Monday September 09, 2002 @03:17AM (#4219129) Homepage Journal
    Some of the best programmers have tried and no single company has been able to succed. The only way to make a protection system work would be to play the game from a central server and use password protection, fingerprint, retinal scan and DNA samples before you can begin playing.

    Pirating has helped some companies in gaining market and mindshare. Sony and Playstation come to mind as does Commodore 64, amiga and the PC. They wouldnt have left the ground if it hadnt been so darn easy to copy the games and apps.Imagine buying all applications on a normal PC without linux?

    Should the PS1 have been as successful if it hadnt been modchipped and games pirated? I dont think so and the same goes for the PC. Install a working copy protection and your user base flies off to another platform instead.
  • A worrying trend (Score:3, Insightful)

    by henben (578800) on Monday September 09, 2002 @04:14AM (#4219249)
    Just recently, there seem to have been a lot of cases of people who speak out against the actions of companies being hired by or "forming a business relationship" with the entity they criticise.

    For example:

    Now I'm not accusing all these people of necessarily selling out, but obviously, if you work with a company, you're less likely to speak frankly about how much it sucks (if only because you have to take into account the interests your employees/shareholders).

You are in a maze of UUCP connections, all alike.

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