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Businesses The Almighty Buck Entertainment Games

Large Publishers Pointing to High Prices 138

Posted by Zonk
from the because-we-aren't-spending-enough-money dept.
Despite Mark Rein's recent statements to the contrary, GamesIndustry.biz has word that Activision, THQ, and Take Two are all indicating that they may be charging $59.99 for next gen titles. From the article: "This strategy is likely to see a two-tier structure emerging for game pricing, where premium titles command a premium price point of $59.99 or more, while less important games are sold for between $39.99 and $49.99 - much closer to the current price point."
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Large Publishers Pointing to High Prices

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  • Sounds about right (Score:5, Informative)

    by vasqzr (619165) <vasqzr@netscaDEGASpe.net minus painter> on Thursday March 17, 2005 @02:32PM (#11968122)
    Compare $50 of todays dollars with $50 in 1990!

    Anyone remember paying $60 or $70 for a NES/SNES new release? Granted, you were paying for larger ROM chips...

    Look at the budgets of some of todays games. Millions of dollars. How much of a budget do you think Megan Man or Castlevania had?

    They have to make the costs up somewhere.
  • by Andy_R (114137) on Thursday March 17, 2005 @02:37PM (#11968199) Homepage Journal
    Here in Britain, $60 US would practically be a price drop.

    Gran Turismo 4 for PS2 has a recommended price of UKP39.99 ($76.9219 US) and the lowest shop price I found on launch day was £29.99 ($57.6761 US).
  • by siljeal (841276) on Thursday March 17, 2005 @02:50PM (#11968379)
    In Germany you pay roughly 55 Euros for new games, and even 59 Euros is not completely unheard of. That's $71.50 to $76 at the current rate. That's why I usually don't buy 'less important' titles and go straight for the gems.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 17, 2005 @04:07PM (#11969294)
    Compare $50 of todays dollars with $50 in 1990!

    $50 in 1990 is now $74.

    Look at the budgets of some of todays games. Millions of dollars. They have to make the costs up somewhere.

    They make it up in sales. The market has grow a lot faster than inflation since 1990.

  • by chromaphobic (764362) on Thursday March 17, 2005 @04:30PM (#11969551)

    I feel the exact same way. I'll pay $60 for a game if I feel I'm going to get $60 worth of entertainment out of it.

    Half-Life 2 is a perfect example, according to X-Fire I've played HL2 for a total of 67 hours! Well worth the money I paid for it, and more.

    On the other hand, there's a game like Call Of Duty. I paid $50 for it back in the day, and as great as the game is, I finished the SP campaign in FIVE hours. I'm not much into online multiplayer, and I've only found it worth one re-play, so I only got 10 hours (at best) of entertainment for my money. NOT worth it.

    More and more, I just wait for the games to hit the bargain bin and buy them for $20-$30 instead. As games continue to rise in price I'm sure more and more people will do they same. Enough to make a difference? Probably not. :-(

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