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Gods, Assassins, and Dragons 23

Posted by Zonk
from the average-saturday-night dept.
I'm not really one to link to reviews or previews, but 1up is running pieces looking at three really, really interesting titles slated for next year. On the theory that at least one of these is going to interest you, I direct you to Matt Leone's look at God of War 2, Shawn Elliot's piece on Assassin's Creed, and the first preview, anywhere, of BioWare's Dragon Age. From that article: "Large-scale combat is also on the top of Greig's mind--no surprise for a game where here, one naturally assumes, there be dragons. 'Remember the cave troll fight in The Fellowship of the Ring? That's what our large creature combat is going to be like. You've got the party guys running out, one guy jumping up on the back and stabbing, the other guy ducking between the legs.' Objects in the environment can be manipulated in your bid for tactical supremacy: Knock over a table to fire arrows or shoot fireballs from behind cover, but only where it makes sense--emergence be damned, in BioWare's reckoning. 'There will be a lot of ways of going through combat, and lots of different ways to interact with the environment...but our philosophy is that handcrafted is always better than random stuff.'"
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Gods, Assassins, and Dragons

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  • That description of combat sounds very interesting. I would really enjoy more interactive combat in combination with more manipulation of environments... but I'm going to take this hype with a grain or two of salt for now.
    • by Fozzyuw (950608) on Friday December 08, 2006 @05:29PM (#17167240)
      That description of combat sounds very interesting. I would really enjoy more interactive combat in combination with more manipulation of environments... but I'm going to take this hype with a grain or two of salt for now.

      I agree with you. It's always a 'fantasy' to have such 'real' combat. However, I distinguish the difference between a fantasy and a dream, by that we want dreams to come true. At least that's what I tell my girlfriend. =p I kid.. I kid..

      but our philosophy is that handcrafted is always better than random stuff.

      As they said, games that are often 'on rails' to some extent (meaning, have direction) are often more enjoyable to gamers than just 'open ended' games. Sure, you can toss tables over to shoot fireballs, or run through legs, or whatever. But, it's an option. Instead, most people will just run to a corner to shoot and not bother. However, if the games cut-screen showed your character tossing tables for defense, it gives the gamer more excitement of action. I imagine it's also not particularly easy to design AI to fight multiple people in open-ended environments.

      Cheers,
      Fozzy

  • Assassins (Score:4, Interesting)

    by miscz (888242) on Friday December 08, 2006 @05:20PM (#17167126)
    I like the part where developer talks about how little we know about assassins and that they are sort of the good guys in the game. To my knowledge they were bunch of fanatical hashish addicts controlled by muslim fundamentalists that were so powerful that even Saladin was scared of them.
    • by reanjr (588767)
      Hmmm... history DOES repeat itself!

      I think you just described half the militant groups in the Middle East...

      Except now they export drugs for money instead of get addicted to them and the name of the ruler is different.
    • I'm anticipating a gut-wrenching amount of political correctness and historical distortion in Assassin's Creed. They should have gone with a different setting.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    The recently released title Might and Magic: Dark Messiah has excellent environmental components. One can kick enemies into all sorts of objects, or kick objects like statues onto enemies. You can use sources of fire to light your arrows on fire, or throw a barrel down steps to knock down a wave of enemies. Also, taking a note from thief, you can shoot arrows that make ropes into wood, and stealth is based off of shadows, movement speed, and the material you step on.

    It can be done, and when done right, is a
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Aeonite (263338)
      With good reason, 1UP.com gave the game a 4/10 because you can overuse the kick, dubbing it "The Adventures of Sir Kicksalot Deathboot in the Land of the Conspicuously Placed Spike Racks".

      My own opinions were mixed, though I fully agree that the seemingly excellent environmental components are actually quite silly. I mostly panned the game in my review of it at http://www.gamegrene.com/node/691 [gamegrene.com]
  • While I am waiting for this with great anticipation (the first one was fantastic...not mind blowing, but fantastic) I think it will signal the beginning of the end for the PS2...

    Unless I have been out of the loop on some amazing other games...
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by blahplusplus (757119)
      "...(the first one was fantastic...not mind blowing, but fantastic)"

      You got to be kidding me, God of War for the PS2 *was* mindblowing, it was one of the first games that really did 'death moves' in real-time action/platform type game that really had visceral emotional impact, the camera work for those death moves was *excellent*, as a gamer who knows a bit about developing games I was pretty fucking impressed by GoW. The art, the atmosphere, the levels, it came together to make a mind blowing experience..
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Pojut (1027544)
        I meant as a whole it wasn't mind blowing. There were, however, some extremely memorable scenes in that game...looking down when on top of the temple and seeing the titan walking the desert...watching the city burn as the end boss was going apeshit...hell, even the sea-serpent first boss.

        Never said it wasn't memorable or amazing. Just wasn't mind-blowing

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