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Wii Businesses Google The Internet

Google Reader - Now for Wii! 28

Posted by Zonk
from the here's-looking-at-you dept.
Thwomp writes "I love using my Wii to catch up on my Google Reader feeds and now that activity is officially supported by Google. It's really great to see that the Google Reader team has created an improved user interface optimized for the Wii's Opera browser and Wiimote. You can also try out the Google Reader for Wii in your browser. Google account is mandatory, of course."
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Google Reader - Now for Wii!

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  • Cool (Score:1, Redundant)

    by Marcion (876801)
    If you get bored with the ebook can you bat it away?
  • Why do consoles continue to try and integrate "PC-like" features? The *only* reason to use a console over a PC is because the games will be optimized for your specific set of hardware, so you can be sure that there are no compatibility issues and it will probably run pretty smooth. For everything else, a console is really just an overpriced, underpowered, practically non-upgradeable box with almost zero control given to the user. Supporting these features is great and all, but it seems like a waste of reso
    • by tepples (727027) <tepples@gm a i l . com> on Saturday May 12, 2007 @01:29PM (#19096997) Homepage Journal

      Why do consoles continue to try and integrate "PC-like" features?
      To discourage would-be homebrewers from modding their console to add PC-like features *cough*XBMC*cough* and then discovering piracy.

      If you've got the TV/monitor and internet connection, why use the console?
      Because another family member is using the PC.
      • I feel like it makes me want to mod the console more, though, because the added features are usually half-baked. On the video end, you never get all the codecs you want supported, for example.
    • The *only* reason to use a console over a PC is because the games will be optimized for your specific set of hardware, so you can be sure that there are no compatibility issues and it will probably run pretty smooth.

      Actually, there's another reason. The Internet Channel in the Wii provides a net-enabled entertainment center. For example, if you browse to video.stumbleupon.com [stumbleupon.com] on your Wii, you can watch various "channels" of net videos on your television. Not only does this easily allow you to share the experience with others around you, but it allows you to view the videos on a larger screen. (Most people still have far larger televisions than they do computer screens. Only us geeks use an HDTV as a computer monitor. :P)

      You can't share that sort of content on a computer nearly as easily as you can on something like the Wii. Sure, you could hook up your computer with a TV-out, but how many average people are really going to do that? And that's not even mentioning sites that provide homebrew video game content through the web browser.
    • by HoneyBunchesOfGoats (619017) on Saturday May 12, 2007 @01:42PM (#19097137)
      I can't speak of other consoles, but I like the Wii browser because it's easy to use from the couch. The Wii is already hooked up to my TV, so I don't have to fumble about with cables to hook up my laptop, change the display settings to put the image on the TV, and then have to sit right next to the TV while I use it. I could get an older computer to leave permanently hooked up to the TV, and a wireless keyboard and mouse for it, but that'd be a whole lot of hassle, and would still have input devices that are less ideal to use from the couch... and for what, to have a more PC-like interface to pull up Wikipedia when people are over? The Wii isn't going to replace my PC and monitor for most of my web usage, but it's ideal for using the web for casual entertainment.
      • by StikyPad (445176)
        that'd be a whole lot of hassle, and would still have input devices that are less ideal to use from the couch.

        I disagree.. I've got an HTPC with a wireless keyboard/mouse, and I find it vastly preferrable to the Wiimote. For starters, there's a touchpad on the keyboard, which sucks, but is still far easier to manipulate than the Wiimote. Even leaning forward to use the mouse on the coffee table is less effort. Additionally, I don't have to spend 10-30 seconds with the wiimote to input text instead of typ
    • by Aladrin (926209) on Saturday May 12, 2007 @01:43PM (#19097153)
      That's the easiest question ever. Because people want it.

      Nintendo tends to be a people company, and they tend to listen to their customers a LOT more than the other console manufacturers. So when it became clear that there was NO way to avoid having things like this on their console, they went ahead and saved everyone the trouble, earning some more money in the process.

      Nothing extra exists to stop someone from writing a homebrew version of these features than would have existed anyhow. In fact, the copy protection on the Wii is amazingly weak. It's almost identical to the Gamecube's, and that was weak as well. Everyone else in the industry has put a LOT more effort into protection.

      So tell me again why they shouldn't do this? Because you don't want it is not good enough, and you don't speak for the majority of people. You probably don't even have a vague clue how many Wii-owners feel as you do.
      • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Nothing extra exists to stop someone from writing a homebrew version of these features than would have existed anyhow. In fact, the copy protection on the Wii is amazingly weak. It's almost identical to the Gamecube's, and that was weak as well. Everyone else in the industry has put a LOT more effort into protection.

        You're correct about copy protection on the wii being pretty much identical to the gamecube, but the two consoles are worlds apart when it comes to homebrew. The executables on the wii are sig

      • by Trogre (513942)
        Everyone else in the industry has put a LOT more effort into protection.

        Except in the area of Region-locking, where the Wii reigns supreme. The PS3 doesn't have it at all (except for old PS2 games that are already regionalized), and the XBox has it as an option to publishers.

    • by Cheapy (809643)
      One word: Friends. Ever invited some friends over to play Counter-Strike with ya? Ever invited 4 friends over to play C&C3?

      Now, have you ever invited some friends over to play Wii Sports? Halo 2?
    • Because many of those who own a console might not have their own PC, specifically HS and college kids. Whether they use their parents' computer, the library computers, or a hand-me-down, they might prefer to do most things on their brand new console. Consoles will likely get the full subset of features provided by cell phones, PDAs, and iPods. Well, everything except the phone calls. But a console is powerful enough to do IM, web browsing, music, video, all sorts of stuff. Actually, a Core 2 Duo or X-2 is o
      • The portion of college students that do not own computers is statistically insignificant. A lot of colleges require students to own a laptop or desktop, and scholarships for laptops are easy to get.

        Oddly enough, this might make a lot of people start getting their news from the TV again. It seems like most people are used to getting their news from the internet these days, but now they can get the same headlines from the same sources on their TV.
        • "A lot of colleges require students to own a laptop or desktop,"
          That's what I hear. But none that I've heard of in RL. Most have labs and libraries for that.

          "and scholarships for laptops are easy to get."
          Never heard of that. Loans, yeah. Grants, if they've got it left over. But not "scholarships."

          "The portion of college students that do not own computers is statistically insignificant."
          Maybe I just don't know the right people going to the right colleges, but I'd say they're not "statistically insignificant.
    • by Moisteri (1082707)
      Well I think the time and resources are well spent in this technology. Think about it. Average Internet user usually visits about 5-15 pages for news and such each day. You can easily bookmark those, so you really dont need any keyboard for browsing. Keyboard comes handy only if You are planning to write long e-mails, forums posts or are doing a lot of surfing. As it is stated, the Wii is designed for casual players so why not to casual Internet users as well? The Wii-mote is also very much like a normal T
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by donaldm (919619)
      It really depends on how far back you like to go. I suppose I could say why do PC's try to emulate workstations, because back in the early 1980's PC's were tty based and if they had graphics they were very clunky compared to the high resolution but expensive graphics of a workstation. If we go back even further I am sure mainframe people were saying the same against workstations.

      The first time I ever saw a FPS game was Wolfenstein and it was running on a 1024x1024 Silicon Graphics Workstation and this was m
    • by 4D6963 (933028)

      Why do consoles continue to try and integrate "PC-like" features?

      Cause they can, and cause some people find it cool/useful or just like to use the hardware they've paid for to the fullest.

    • by drsquare (530038)

      If you've got the TV/monitor and internet connection, why use the console?
      Because all the games you want to play are console-exclusive. Oh, and you want to play in the living room on the big TV rather than in the dark cramped computer room.
    • by trdrstv (986999) on Sunday May 13, 2007 @01:41PM (#19105011)

      Why do consoles continue to try and integrate "PC-like" features? The *only* reason to use a console over a PC is because the games will be optimized for your specific set of hardware, so you can be sure that there are no compatibility issues and it will probably run pretty smooth. For everything else, a console is really just an overpriced, underpowered, practically non-upgradeable box with almost zero control given to the user. Supporting these features is great and all, but it seems like a waste of resources to me. If you've got the TV/monitor and internet connection, why use the console?


      First of all, who is "Wasting resources" on this? Nintendo? Hardly. This isn't a "Nintendo Browser" that they have to develop and maintain, they made a deal with Opera so they could provide a version of "Opera for Devices" to that platform. It's Win-Win-Win. Nintendo offers a feature to their customers, that does not drive up the price of the system (completely optional, and free until July 1) and Opera has exclusive rights to that marketplace. The consumer gets a good browser for Free or cheap, (depending on when you get it). If you want a web browser on your PC, the choices are abundant. If you want it on the Wii, you get Opera. The console life span is about 4-6 years (historicaly speaking) and for all but the first 6 months that browser will be $ for Opera ($5 -minus whatever Nintendo gets) and more exposure to their brand for their other products. Nintendo probably does QA testing for certification, but likely nothing greater than what they would do for a game.


      As far as "Why would anyone use this over a PC?" I admit, I was skeptical, but most of my 'leasurely web-surfing' is pretty simple with a mouse only (and short inputs with the software keyboard). Strong Bad works, Slashdot works, YouTube works... and for relaxing, my couch beats my computer chair every time. It also boots up alot faster than my PC. It's ironic that I use the Wii nearly every day, but don't play games on it every day. I check the weather, the headlines and my email when I get up and have my coffee. For about 80% of what I use the computer for, the Wii has already replaced it... Now if their Opera would just support Divx...

"In matters of principle, stand like a rock; in matters of taste, swim with the current." -- Thomas Jefferson

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