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XBox (Games) Businesses Microsoft

Microsoft Aims to Boost the 360's Family Appeal 90

Posted by Zonk
from the i-didn't-know-four-year-olds-could-frag-like-that dept.
Bloomberg is reporting on Microsoft's efforts to be more inclusive to 'family' game players. Essentially, Micrsoft admits they're looking to Nintendo as the generation leader this time around, with low cost and family appeal driving their sales numbers ever higher. To that end, Microsoft is looking at a possible price cut and shift in strategies to appeal to a broader audience. This dovetails with comments made by Bill Gates at the AllThingsDigital event regarding motion controls in the future of the console. "Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer wants to avoid the fate of the first Xbox. The console appealed mainly to hard-core gamers, generally males between 15 and 29 years old, and trailed Sony Corp.'s PlayStation 2 in sales by a 5-to-1 margin ... Microsoft's initial attempts to target children didn't live up to the company's expectations. A November game called Viva Piñata, in which kids build a garden and raise animals that look like piñatas brought to life, didn't make it into the top 20, even with a Saturday morning cartoon created to promote the game." It might not have sold, but VP was an awesome game.
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Microsoft Aims to Boost the 360's Family Appeal

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  • by WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) * <sexwithanimals@gmail.com> on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:22AM (#19439097) Homepage
    You've managed to spell Microsoft incorrectly.

    5 internets for you!
  • Two Words (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ThePolkapunk (826529) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:26AM (#19439181) Homepage
    Price Drop
  • Don't use a demon possessed baby in the advertisements.
  • The 360 is not Wii.
    • by archen (447353)
      And to add to that "The Family" does not add up to Hardcore gamer + kids in a target demographics. If you really want to see an entire family have fun together, you can look at a title like Wii sports. Kids, grandparents, Women and yes, even the hardcore gamers can enjoy the game TOGETHER at the same time. Microsoft can scheme up these "lets expand our market share by targeting families" all they want to but in the end their results will never really get them there because they don't get it.

      The Wii (and
      • by Altus (1034)

        Ive noticed that the other platforms don't really have multi player games that go over 2 people. I mean im sure they do but there don't seem to be as many. Nintendo has always been good at this, from party games to Mario Kart. I usually use a Nintendo console with a reasonably large group of people. Thats one of the reasons I bought a Wii.
        • by tepples (727027)

          Ive noticed that the other platforms don't really have multi player games that go over 2 people.
          Up to eight can play at once in online Halo 2 (Xbox) or online Gears of War (Xbox 360). True, they're M-rated, and it's not shared-screen, but enough of the PC and Xbox fans seem to claim that it's best to put separate views on separate consoles and separate TVs.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Altus (1034)

            Don't get me wrong, there are great online options but running an 8 player halo game over the internet is not generally a "party game" so its different than what I was trying to describe on Nintendo.

            Nintendo has really gone after the market segment where a group of people get together impromptu and play some simple fun game in a group setting. I'm not talking about a Lan party where everyone brings over a system but just the sort of thing that can be picked up when you have some friends over.

            Im sure there
          • by Jason Earl (1894)

            The last thing that most parents want is for their children to play Gears of War or Halo 2 with random asshats on line. The fact that XBox Live exists actually works against Microsoft when selling to families. Parents want a console where they can monitor who their children play with without knowing anything about TCP/IP, and where people can play together while sitting in the same room.

            Microsoft is doing fairly well with the sort of gamer that plays M-rated games and sneers at the idea of sharing a scr

          • by LKM (227954)
            Online multiplayer games are really quite different from local multiplayer games. It's a different kind of socializing. I prefer to have a bunch of friends over and play against them while they're sitting in the same room. Online multiplayer is often not a whole lot more than single player gaming with really intelligent AI which constantly swears at you.
            • Online multiplayer games are really quite different from local multiplayer games. It's a different kind of socializing.

              Why aren't there more local 4-player games for PCs like mine, which have a USB hub for gamepads and a TV output? Why do Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo have to approve all local 4-player games?

              Online multiplayer is often not a whole lot more than single player gaming with really intelligent AI which constantly swears at you.

              Unless you happen to join a clan, and the really intelligent AI swears with you, not at you.

              • by 7Prime (871679)
                Is that you're reasoning for playing PC games? Corporate approval?

                It's called quality control. And seeing that Nintendo and Microsoft make (and own companies that make) a lot of the greatest video games ever made, I think they're pretty good judges of quality. Sony hardly does any approval, and it shows (bucketloads of crappy titles). All they really ask is that developers actually do a good job on their games as to not make their systems look bad. As someone in a media design field, I'm ALL for quality con
                • by tepples (727027)

                  All [the console makers] really ask is that developers actually do a good job on their games as to not make their systems look bad.
                  They also ask that developers have proven themselves on some other platform, be sufficiently large corporations or LLCs, and lease office space. At least Nintendo states on warioworld.com that it requires these. So how should a smaller team, even one with a nearly completed PC version of a local multiplayer game, sell its game to the public?
                  • by 7Prime (871679)
                    Do just that... it's not a lot to ask. One thing Nintendo is looking for is seriousness and longevity. Are you going to turn around and burn them, and your fan base, by not delivering? That's just bad for the industry. Of course, having put out ONE PC game is not a great judge, but it's a start, and it's not a lot to ask, either.

                    It's really the only way to avoid what happened in the early 80s. We went through it, and it sucked, and the industry almost died and rotted with bad designers who poisoned the whol
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Jason Earl (1894)

      The 360 is not Wii.

      That's precisely what makes the business people unhappy about the 360. Nintendo is already making money on the Wii while Microsoft has *lost* more than $1.2 billion this year alone on the 360. What's more Nintendo is likely to sell at least 60% more consoles this year than Microsoft despite the fact that Nintendo had to deal with supply issues with their new console.

      The 360 is most definitely *not* the Wii, and investors wish it was.

  • For me: (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sqlrob (173498) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:33AM (#19439307)
    Increase reliability

    Drop Price (optional, reliability is more important to me right now)

    • Yeah, let me reiterate something - the top three issues, for me, are:

      1) Increase reliability
      2) Increase reliability
      3) Don't gouge us so much for DLC

      My 360 crapped out on me (Ring of Death) after six months. SIX MONTHS. A $400 piece of hardware dies after six months of fairly heavy use? I've had a $500 video card, running nearly constantly, last for well over three years now.

      It's great that it fell under the warranty. Fix it for free. But this can take a month or more, and you're not guaranteed a workin
  • by badasscat (563442) <[basscadet75] [at] [yahoo.com]> on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:35AM (#19439359)
    You can't on the one hand promote games like Halo 3 and Gears of War as your premiere games (and whoever actually publishes them, MS has gone out of their way to promote the system using them) and then on the other hand try to market your system as a "family system". It's one or the other.

    I know everybody wants to live in a world where everything is all things to all people, but it doesn't work like that. The fact is there is competition out there doing the family thing better than MS ever will - namely Nintendo. So why would a parent buy an Xbox 360 to play games with their kids when the Wii exists?

    I hate to tell MS, but the 360 is going to meet the exact same fate as the original Xbox - it's the system for hardcore gamers. If MS wants it to be anything else, then they need to focus like a laser beam on making it something else - they can't throw all their weight behind MA-rated violent shooters like they have been, then whine about how families aren't buying the system. That's a bit like a porn movie publisher wondering why people keep spending money going to Disneyland instead of buying porn movies.

    MS can't be the "family game" company as long as they keep promoting themselves with MA-rated shooters any more than Nintendo can be the "hardcore gamer" company as long as they keep promoting themselves with Mario and Pokemon. Companies have to make choices, and these are the choices they've made. It just so happens that Nintendo's strategy is working and MS's isn't - but if MS wants to change their strategy, then they need to actually change their strategy. Just saying they want some of that audience isn't going to accomplish anything.
    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      Just because I enjoy Super Monkey Ball, Mario, Zelda, Mario Party and other, does that mean I can't be a hardcore gamer? I can spend a lot of hours playing those games. Microsoft puts out a certain image to appeal to 14-25 year old males, and that's the crowd they get. However, just because you don't fit that demographic doesn't mean you can't be a hardcore gamer. Hardcore gamer is defined by how much time or money you will spend on a system, and not by which specific games you play.
      • by Pojut (1027544)
        Not a flame, I'm genuinly curious...what is your definition of a hardcore gamer? For me, it's not just time but also your attidue toward gaming in general. Do you see it as a way to unwind and relax, or do you take it seriously like Jeremy from Pure Pwnage?

        Personally, I spend between 20-25 hours a week gaming and consider myself a "hardcore-light" gamer. While I am somewhat competitive (I will play the same map over and over and over just so I can improve on that one map for that one game) I still don't
        • I would define "Hardcore gamer" using two criteria: First, one must enjoy gaming for its own sake. Understand and appreciate the nuances of various game engines, follow the evolution of the technology, listen to game music in your spare time, understand character archetypes in RPGs, things like that. Appreciate the game as an entity unto itself, rather than just as a means to an end (killing time, fun with friends, etc.) Certainly means-to-an-end gaming is not forbidden, but I'd classify a hardcore game
          • by Pojut (1027544)
            Based on your definition of a hardcore gamer, I would say point number one I am DEFINATELY a hardcore gamer. As for point number two, I would say I'm hardcore light (although I do spend an exhorbitant amount of money on gaming, I don't think I am a full hardcore gamer simply because I am below the 30-hour a week mark.) Thanks for sharing though:-)
          • by aichpvee (631243)
            So what you're saying is that microsoft has the most softcore gamer crowd ever, right?
          • by Kelbear (870538)
            I believe there's two definitions, one based on the interpretation of the words composing "hardcore gamer" and one based on the popular usage.

            CelticWhisper's matches up with the words much better, but the more popular usage is competitive, violent, big-name titles. Generally FPS, though sometimes RTS. The primary facet is the competition part. There could be a better name for this sort of concept, but "Hardcore Gamer" is what has been assigned to it.

            Simply based on the term itself I would think of CelticWhi
            • by 7Prime (871679)
              This is why I hate the term "hardcore gamer". Hardcore is often equated with pr0n, violence, competativeness, and overall macho attitude. I play games for none of these things, yet I consider myself a pretty avid gamer, probably moreso than most self-proclaimed "hardcore gamers."

              I'd like to hear the term "game connoisseur", or "game enthusiast" thrown around a little more. The "hardcore gamer" is really one segment of the gamer crowd, who seems to have been able to put themselves on a pedestal above everyon
        • by LKM (227954)

          For me, it's not just time but also your attidue toward gaming in general. Do you see it as a way to unwind and relax, or do you take it seriously like Jeremy from Pure Pwnage?

          So you can only be a hardcore gamer if you hate Mario?

          A hardcore gamer is somebody who has gaming as a main hobby, games a whole freaking lot, and plays all the games he wants to, not only those that make him look cool in the eyes of his peers.

          • by KDR_11k (778916)
            So you can only be a hardcore gamer if you hate Mario?

            That should be the definition of a "gore kiddy".
      • by cowscows (103644) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:57AM (#19439763) Journal
        I don't think he's saying that, he's just saying that Nintendo directs their advertising energies in other directions.

        At the end of the day, you're just arguing semantics. "Hardcore gamer" is not some certifiable title that you can get. Like you said, it's about how much you play. For the bulk of the history of console video gaming, the people who have played lots and lots of video games have been 14-25 males, so they've basically become synomomus with "hardcore gaming" so games made to target the hardcore gaming crowd (which historically has been the largest and most profitable market) have primarily targeted that demographic group.

        The vocabulary you use to describe your view of the gaming world is different than the vocabulary used by marketing people and executives, and even many other gamers.
        • by 7Prime (871679)
          I dunno if it's how much you play, but how much thought and energy you put into it. I think I'm more than just a hobbiest. I have plans to work in the field one day, and if not that, the media in general, so I'm soaking up gobbs of design principals, and analyzing what works and doesn't work. I enjoy games, but I also am a student of them, as well.
    • by maddskillz (207500) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:55AM (#19439721)

      You can't on the one hand promote games like Halo 3 and Gears of War as your premiere games (and whoever actually publishes them, MS has gone out of their way to promote the system using them) and then on the other hand try to market your system as a "family system". It's one or the other.

      Why must it be one or the other? You can even have two separate advertising campaigns.
      If I were a parent, I would like not having to buy two pieces of hardware, to do essentially the same thing. I am not saying I would want the kids to play my games (or for me to play theirs) but I wouldn't want to have to duplicate hardware.
      • by p0tat03 (985078)

        I'm a bit on the fence about this. On one hand, part of the Wii's charm is that a parent wouldn't have to worry about junior getting his hands on extremely questionable games.

        Sure, there's Red Steel and Far Cry and some violent shooters, but I can rest easy knowing that junior isn't killing hookers, or chainsawing people in half, or watching limbs fly as he rolls explosive cans of propane into them...

        On the other hand, one has to wonder how much that selling point is really worth. Some parents may be tu

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Chokolad (35911)
          > I'm a bit on the fence about this. On one hand, part of the Wii's charm is that a parent wouldn't have to worry about junior getting his hands on extremely questionable games.

          Well, 360 has pretty nice parental controls. You can set them up and kid will not be able to start anything with higher rating than, say "E" "T"
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by damiangerous (218679)
          On one hand, part of the Wii's charm is that a parent wouldn't have to worry about junior getting his hands on extremely questionable games.

          Sure, there's Red Steel and Far Cry and some violent shooters, but I can rest easy knowing that junior isn't killing hookers, or chainsawing people in half, or watching limbs fly as he rolls explosive cans of propane into them...

          He's ripping testicles off with pliers. Or he's using the Wiimote to make sawing motions as he cuts off heads to wear on his belt. That is

      • The marketing is a problem though. Microsoft's marketing seems to push the mature games to the extent that it almost seems there aren't any children's games.

        Also, while I do respect their interest in keeping the platform affordable, it would be nice to get an XB360 offered with built-in HDDVD without having to buy the ridiculous side car add-on.
    • by gad_zuki! (70830)
      >So why would a parent buy an Xbox 360 to play games with their kids when the Wii exists?

      Because life is full of compromises. Say you have a teen and a younger kid. Or a boy and a girl. Then parents need to know what system is the most diverse instead of locking in on whatever specialty marketing has decided.

      Or they dont want to pay 250 for a wii right after they bought their kid a perfectly good DS last year for 150. In this market the Wii isnt competing with MS and Sony, but with the DS.

      Or they think
    • "It's one or the other."

      Yeah, that would be like Sony trying to sell a system that could play played both children's movies and porno. [circuitcity.com]

      Given how huge Microsoft is, I'm not sure why they can't cover more than one market. Games like Viva Pinata prove that the 360 can render "cute" as well as "gore". ;)

    • At least MS is probably making a lot of fanboys' heads explode!
  • by CastrTroy (595695) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:37AM (#19439401) Homepage
    Even with their 1 year release headstart, Nintendo is quickly approaching them [vgchartz.com] in systems sold. It's become apparent that you can only sell so many systems to hardcore gamers, and that it's hard to sell expensive systems, even to hardcore gamers. Targetting children and families cannot be done by releasing a single game, or by releasing some peripherals which have motion sensing. It must be something that is the core of your system. Looking at the XBox 360 controller is daunting for people who aren't hardcore gamers, as is the size and look of the entire console. They're going to have a hard time turning things around for their current system. However, if they want to make a start, how about releasing a web browser. It's not like they don't already have one.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by DesertBlade (741219)
      Mod parent! Nice site the best view is when you align the start dates. PS3 and XBOX360 are about equal.
      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Thanks for the tip. I (the poster) didn't even realize you could align by start date. I'm in the process of trying to compare the Wii to the PS2, but it keeps timing out when I pick PS2.
  • by BlackCobra43 (596714) on Friday June 08, 2007 @11:43AM (#19439499)
    It's pretty simple, really; package a Wii with the 360. The Wii60 package will be a force to be reckoned with and will leave the PS3 in the dust.
    • it's ironic how you mention this. my initial reaction was to keep the xbox just as it is and promote your gears of wars and halo series... while on the other hand developing a second console to compete with the wii head on. If any company has the resources for such an endeavour it would be MS.

      Product1: MS xbox360
      Product2: MS family oriented wii-clone
      • also: let's just go ahead and pretend like another console on the market from the same company wouldn't also compete with their flagship product and actually could compete independently in it's own family genre sub-market.
        • Given how SKU-crazy Microsoft already is, why not?

          They could just take the Xbox 360 and put it in a shorter, wider (less intimidating) case that comes in pastel pink or turquoise, and rebadge/repurpose it as the family-friendly "FunBox" or "PrettyPonyMachine" or somesuch. The same games would play on both systems, but they can advertise it as a wholly different line with a different marketing thrust.

  • The average family non-gamer isn't going to use a controller with 3 different control sticks, 4 triggers and a pile of face buttons; it has to be simplified to be made "family friendly". But since it's far too late to make that change now without breaking every 360 title out there, Microsoft's quest to capture some of Nintendo's market is in vain for this generation.
  • MS made a solid console for the hardcore gamers. They need to stick with that. Nobody's trying to play puzzle, party, kiddy games on xbox. I want some violent adult shit on there. Competitive games with Live support. I was going to buy a 360 on day one but there are not enough hardcore games out. The last thing I want to see is MS putting out family crap. Where's the fighting games? Where's King of Fighters? How about some shooters, Ikaruga 2 anyone? Games these days are dumbed down and soft. I want some so
    • by Jason Earl (1894) on Friday June 08, 2007 @02:25PM (#19442595) Homepage Journal

      The problem with your idea is that Microsoft lost $1.2 billion on the XBox this last fiscal year. It's easy to say that Microsoft should simply target hard core gamers, but promoting to hard core gamers doesn't pay the bills. The money is clearly in the market that Nintendo is targeting with the Wii.

      Microsoft has promised investors that the XBox would make a profit in the year starting in July, and that isn't going to happen if everyone purchases from Nintendo instead. To a certain extent Microsoft is only still in the console business because it can afford to lose more than its competitors. "Willing to lose more money" is not an attribute that investors prize very highly.

    • Where's the fighting games? Where's King of Fighters? How about some shooters, Ikaruga 2 anyone? (...) I want some something I can't beat on the first or even 10th try.

      Since you already have a Wii: Virtual Console. It's even going to get Neo Geo games, so KoF is a possibility.

      Isn't it ironic... don't you think. It's like hardcore games, on your Wiiiii...

    • by 7Prime (871679)
      The problem is, even "hardcore gamers", make up a small percentage of even the avid gamer crowd. I'm defining "hardcore gamers" as specifically the psychographic who is looking for violent, competative, fast-paced, complicated games. There's a whole lot of other gamers out there, however, who put just as much time, energy, and most importantly, MONEY, into it, who are not at all put off by the all-inclusive philosophy of the Wii. Myself, for instance; I see the Wii as being more inclusive of my aesthetic th
  • The one thing all "older" family members expect from a console is stability and reliability. Just imagine your dad in front of a flashing ring of death. *shudders*
  • I don't think that it's the family appeal of the Wii that is drawing people. I believe it is the price and the novelty of it. At least in my family, I have an original XBox and a 360 (Thank you very much EveryTenMinutes.com/Mountain Dew), and my brothers all have PS/2's. When they were deciding which game console to get next, the immediately ruled out the PS/3 on price and what they considered to be lame titles. Despite the fact that they have kids 10 down to 3, they think the Wii is actually too kid-f
    • by 2nd Post! (213333)
      How do you know if you don't own a Wii?

      You only know that you think it will be boring... when the Wii is spectacularly set up for FPS (the wiimote as a gun, for example), as well as all the other genres.
    • by LKM (227954)
      I think you should give the Wii a chance. As a 27 year old male who often games with his pals (26-40 years old), the Wii is definitely the most popular console. Too kiddy? Only if you need to impress your school pals with your violent games. And even then, you'll soon get Manhunt II :-)
  • A movie that was merely pretty good, Home Alone, went to gross nearly half a billion dollars (third highest at the time) because it was just about the only family movie to be released around that time. Looks like the same thing happened with the Wii.
  • Making a plug-in for Wii games and remotes!
  • Wrong Target (Score:2, Interesting)

    by JamesRose (1062530)
    Look, they say family market, which means they're targetting the quite concentrated range of 6-60 year olds.If you target the parents and the kids at the same time you aren't going to please them both, and at best if you do please them both they'll buy one for the house and probably share it. However, only target kids, or only target adults, much easier to please your target market, but at the same time, the same amount of people end up with xboxs in their homes. Why is common sense a quality completely lo
  • by rlp (11898) on Friday June 08, 2007 @12:31PM (#19440357)
    Microsoft should create a new line of games for kids. I suggest starting with Super Mario Monopoly. You play an Italian plumber who's running a very very large software company. Your opponent Bowser runs a search engine company. You play by taking money from consumers, collecting other small companies, and throwing chairs at your opponents. Fun for the whole family!
    • by Anonymous Coward
      It's called "Uncle Festers house of fun", it involves chair throwing, imitating everyone else and making childish threats over unspecified "IP". It'll be fun for all the family, children of all ages can now learn to emulate Microsoft's psychopathic behavior.
      • by Dogtanian (588974)

        It's called "Uncle Festers house of fun", it involves chair throwing, imitating everyone else and making childish threats over unspecified "IP". It'll be fun for all the family, children of all ages can now learn to emulate Microsoft's psychopathic behavior.
        Don't you mean "Super Monkey Ballmer"?
  • Not going to work. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by stonecypher (118140) <stonecypherNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Friday June 08, 2007 @12:34PM (#19440431) Homepage Journal
    The only way you can pick up the family safe demographic is by discarding all other demographics, and it takes years for parental trust to change for a given company. They couldn't take the family demographic without throwing away everything they already have, or coming up with some form of radical departure from current business models.

    Whereas I applaud Microsoft for looking to learn from its competition, and for admitting that this generation belongs to Nintendo, this is not something they can adapt by graft without doing tremendous damage to themselves. It would, in my opinion as a professional game designer, be a fatal error.
    • "...and for admitting that this generation belongs to Nintendo."

      Over-generalize and over-hype things much? It's been a little over a year and nobody (sane) is about to call anything on "winners" and "losers" of a console generation. Microsoft has been doing well with the 360, lots of great titles and Live is better than anyone could have imagined... Several sites and people have mentioned that the 360 is making microsoft Money (the Division is still in the red however). Nintendo is still raking in mone
  • It looks like Microsoft has been working on their innovation - after all, they have been talking about it for long enough. This time around, the Microsoft innovation is only a year behind the original.
  • Viva Piñata (Score:4, Insightful)

    by LordNimon (85072) on Friday June 08, 2007 @01:18PM (#19441309)
    Anyone who's played Viva Piñata knows that it's not a kid's game. It's too difficult for young children and too silly for older children. The marketing droids who came up with that angle should be taken out back and shot.

    Viva Piñata is really a game for housewives. I know, because my wife (who doesn't play video games) is absolutely addicted to it.
    • by Raenex (947668)

      Viva Piñata is really a game for housewives.
      I agree. Is anybody surprised that Zonk is a housewife?
  • The whole article is just speculation (some of it stupid) from analysts. The only exception is this sentence:

    To lure them, the world's largest software maker says it plans to add more family games and redo retail displays to make the children's titles easier to find.

    Of course, there's no mention of what these games will be or when they'll be released, so even with this statement we still don't know anything.
  • I find it ironic that everyone always used to say that the Gamecube failed because it didn't have the "hardcore" games like GTA and Halo, but now all of the sudden the Wii is successful because it has "family appeal". That argument just doesn't float if you ask me. I think that the Wii is popular because it's new, different, and has a controller that's more "inviting" than the average console controller (with a little bit of "fadness" thrown in for good measure), and not because it appeals to moms and old p
  • by Bones3D_mac (324952) on Friday June 08, 2007 @02:55PM (#19443087)
    It's hard to consider it a fault of Microsoft that the system appeals mostly with hard-core gamers when we already know hard core gamers in the PC world are more than happy to spend a hefty premium to have the fastest hardware available. The power of the hardware and the bragging rights that come with being privileged enough to own such hardware is often far more important to a hard-core gamer than the games themselves.

    On the other hand, people who are planning to buy mostly kid-friendly games aren't going to care what system they buy just as long as it's not too expensive. Most kids who'd play these games aren't going to care about how good the graphics of a game are, just as long as they can still play the game in question. For people like this, the PS2 works just as well as the 360. The 360 would simply be unnecessary overkill for playing the latest kids movie turned game of the week.

    If Microsoft truly wants to have the 360 appeal to this area of the gaming market, they shold price the 360 competatively with the PS2 (or at least the Wii), rather than trying to force the system's legitimacy with games like Viva Pinata (which could have ran on the PS2 by trading the model complexity for a few texturing tricks).
  • My wife beta tests nearly every new mmorpg that comes out. Ive been playing FPSes since wolfenstein 3d covering duke nukem, and every half life & mod there is. Our kids have an atari, a nintendo, a nintendo 64, a sega cd, a playstation a playstation2 and a huge collection of all kinds of other made for the TV games. We don't have cable access. We don't have satellite TV we simply play games.we have 1 tv and 5 computers. The reason we do not own an Xbox or Xbox 360 is simple. It costs way too much, and t
  • "Oh shit, Nintendo's back... what are we going to do???"

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