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Lost, Heroes, And Videogames 19

Posted by Zonk
from the oh-my dept.
At the Hollywood and Games Summit this week Jesse Alexander, the executive producer for TV shows like Heroes and Lost, spoke on a panel dedicated to the connection between television and games. "The conversation started by looking at how Lost ... has really used websites and online [Alternate Reality Game (ARG)]-like structures to draw people into the show - Moledina suggested that the TV show has deep problem-solving skills like in games. Alexander noted in response: 'Yeah, that was part of what we wanted to make. Alias came out in 2001, the same time that Neil Young was doing [early subscription-based ARG] Majestic. That was very inspiring to us. His keynote at GDC where he talked about that, was similar to us with Alias, in terms of serialized narrative.'" For full notes from the event, Alice and the Wonderland blog have you covered.
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Lost, Heroes, And Videogames

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  • Brand marketing (Score:4, Interesting)

    by gravos (912628) on Friday June 29, 2007 @10:29AM (#19688729) Homepage

    Of course, Moledina countered, there's a competing licensing theory that you can sell games just based on the brand, to which Alexander agreed: "That's true in the worst ways ever..."
    I give the guy credit for acknowledging this serious problem and not just playing it off. In my opinion, the biggest barrier to valuable interaction between games and other media is the fallout that crappy spinoffs cause. They make people assume that ANY movie/tv-to-game tie in must be bad and ultimately erode consumer confidence.
    • by hal2814 (725639)
      "They make people assume that ANY movie/tv-to-game tie in must be bad and ultimately erode consumer confidence."

      That's not limited to games. Ever had Donald Duck orange juice or Dagwood luncheon meat? They're terrible. From my personal experience, I've learned that if a product is good, it doesn't usually need some sort of tie-in for it. Three Stooges beer sucks and you know it sucks because if it were any good, they wouldn't bother to license the Three Stooges name to put on the label. Granted, video
      • But gaming in particular is a whole different ball of string because of complex level of interactivity. Branding luncheon meat or beer will not make the experience "interactive" -- ie, you're not drinking beer with the Three Stooges when you drink 3 Stooges Beer. I think companies like Lucas Arts have proven that there's a step beyond branding by making games that actually immerses you in the experience. Games like Tie Fighter weren't just rebranded shooters with slapped on ship models and vague storylin
  • There's at least one version of Lost that's been turned into a game [apple.com].
  • This is nothing new at all in the world of entertainment. People have been searching for interesting ways to connect the audience with the program beyond its time slot at least since the days of Little Orphan Annie's decoder ring. [wikipedia.org]
    • People have been searching for interesting ways to connect the audience with the program beyond its time slot at least since the days of Little Orphan Annie's decoder ring.
      Drink More Ovaltine! :-D
  • Although I think it's somewhat lesser known, a similar thing was the Wingmakers [wingmakers.com] craze a few years back. That consisted of a CD with a pdf novel, and some other multimedia, (music and artwork) to essentially create something that seemed like a cross between the Blair Witch Project and the X Files.

    Although I don't think they're still doing it now, the similarity to the Blair Witch Project was due to the authors initially casting doubt on whether the material was intended to be seen as possibly being based on

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