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Second World of Warcraft Expansion Launched, Conquered 386

Posted by Soulskill
from the worldwide-caffeine-shortage dept.
The much-anticipated second expansion to World of Warcraft, entitled Wrath of the Lich King, launched on Thursday, introducing a new continent, raising the level cap to 80, and bringing a wealth of new items, spells, dungeons, and monsters to the popular MMO. Crowds gathered and lines formed outside stores around the world leading up to the release. Massively has put together a series of articles for players wishing to familiarize themselves with the expansion, and CVG has a piece discussing the basics as well. It didn't take long for the first person to reach level 80; a French player called "Nymh" reached the level cap on his Warlock only 27 hours after the expansion went live. Not to be outdone, a guild named "TwentyFifthNovember" managed to get at least 25 raiders to 80 and then cleared all of the current expansion raid content less than three days after the launch. Fortunately for them, the next three content patches are each expected to contain new, more difficult raids.
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Second World of Warcraft Expansion Launched, Conquered

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 16, 2008 @12:49PM (#25778509)

    ...is in Northrend.

  • by Idimmu Xul (204345) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @12:50PM (#25778517) Homepage Journal

    whenever anyone else makes it to level 80, I really don't want to miss any of their important in game breakthroughs.

    Stuff that matters, indeed.

    • by Aeonite (263338) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @12:52PM (#25778537) Homepage

      The only thing better than grinding to 80 is vicariously experiencing the grind through the achievements of strangers.

      • I get to save money this way, but still experience the joy of the final screenshot of the successful raiding party!

      • by myrdos2 (989497) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:36PM (#25778829)
        I find the Penny Arcade comic sums up my feelings on the expansion: clicky [penny-arcade.com]

        Seriously - how many areas are just the same area over and over again with different graphics? The towns and mountains and such are in different places, but by level 10 you've pretty much seen all the gameplay there is to see.

        I predict Northrend will have individual monsters slowly roaming back and forth over small areas of ground. Occasionally there will be a few monsters standing together. Virtually every quest will involve killing X of them. To step things up, you can kill difficult elite monsters while in a group. The combat will be so simple that an 8-line perl script can do it.

        When you try to imagine the game without the graphics, you realize how little gameplay there actually is. It might be feasible to make a nethack-style game that captures every element of WoW gameplay, but that would be a very dull game indeed.
        • by Aeonite (263338)

          Notably, you have also just summed up D&D 4th Edition.

        • You've never raided, have you?

          You've summed up gameplay up to the cap correctly, but the game changes drastically in hard dungeons and raids. You can argue it's still repetitive, and to some extent it is, but it's no longer as simple as soloing is.
        • by Kjella (173770) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:09PM (#25779433) Homepage

          The combat will be so simple that an 8-line perl script can do it.

          Considering you could write an operating system in five, I guess that's pretty complex.

        • by _Sprocket_ (42527) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @04:14PM (#25779841)

          I predict Northrend will have individual monsters slowly roaming back and forth over small areas of ground. Occasionally there will be a few monsters standing together. Virtually every quest will involve killing X of them. To step things up, you can kill difficult elite monsters while in a group. The combat will be so simple that an 8-line perl script can do it.

          Yes, yes. And every computer game can be reduced to punching a few buttons and / or clicking on the mouse in a repetitive fashion. Yet despite this simplification, they have always been fun.

          More on this later.

          When you try to imagine the game without the graphics, you realize how little gameplay there actually is. It might be feasible to make a nethack-style game that captures every element of WoW gameplay, but that would be a very dull game indeed.

          And that's selling the graphics really short. Sure the graphics are a big part of WoW. Blizzard does a really nice job with it. Some people don't care. My group runs around sight-seeing.

          I'm not saying that something more wouldn't be great. I miss a lot of UO and various MUDs I've played in the past. Indeed - WoW is much simpler than these environments. And much more restricted. But again - it doesn't mean it's not fun.

          So why is it fun? Well - to begin with there's nothing wrong with traditional escort, FedEx, or even kill quests. If they're done right. WoW's quests usually have some reasoning behind it. They work to expand the storyline if that's what you want to get in to (I do). They put you in to the content and give you a reason to interact with your environment. Nothing wrong with it.

          But yeah - kill quests alone have limits. This expansion pack is introducing new elements such as vehicles that you get to toy with fairly soon in to the content. There ARE different aspects being rolled in to the quests. My group is still pretty early in to the content and we've gotten to experience some of it already. And we're having fun.

        • by Tom (822) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @04:27PM (#25779923) Homepage Journal

          When you try to imagine the game without the graphics, you realize how little gameplay there actually is. It might be feasible to make a nethack-style game that captures every element of WoW gameplay, but that would be a very dull game indeed.

          The one thing that Nethack lacks, that would make it an instant WoW-Killer, is multiplayer.

          Seriously. Multiplayer-Nethack? That's 10 times the gameplay, depth and challenge of WoW right there.

        • by Bazar (778572) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @05:31PM (#25780363)

          When you try to imagine the game without the graphics, you realize how little gameplay there actually is.

          As opposed to say first-person shooters, you remove the graphics from that game, and your left with what?

          You are in a room with 3 first-aid kits, a player Zero is camping the Quad power up and has spotted you entering the room
          Quake> Kill Zero
          Zero was killed by Bazar, your score is now 5
          Quake> Camp Quad

          Ultimately most people play games to have fun. Not everyone appreciates a game where to kill a target you have to have done computations in calculus to plot the best path of attack, or in the case of nethack, play such a perfect game as a tiny screwup can result in death.
          Some people want to just be able to run up to something and press the kill button.

          For those seeking a greater challenge, they can do PvP or raids.

          PvP is where your fighting another player, its as complex as it can get as its a game of attacks and counters. Success is usually a mixture of gear and skill.

          Or you could raid with other players, the encounters are more challenging and require things like good timing. You could also pick up a leadership, helping coordinate members of the team. Someone needs to lead the raid, the tanks, the healers, and the dps.

          Ultimately what I'm trying to say is there is there IS a rich tapestry of gameplay. But if your just out killing stuff by yourself, you not likely to see much of it.

          Do some raiding, or enter some battlegrounds for pvp.
          Most of all MMORPG games are a social game, make/get some friends and/or join a guild, and you'll be having far more fun.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by duckInferno (1275100)
          Blizzard dropped the ball between levels 1 and 50: it's very misrepresentative of the "real" WoW. Many play it to 10, think "okay this is getting repetative/boring", try a different character, find no difference and then make a post on slashdot.

          At 60+, you will notice that not only do the ten classes have significantly different playstyles and things going for them, but that they also have three different talent trees. For most of the ten classes, a switch from one tree to another will again completely
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by nleaf (953206)
          You can simplify everything down to a few repetitious tasks.

          "Seriously - how many [FPSes] are just the same [game] over and over again with different graphics? ...but by [the time you've killed something] you've pretty much seen all of the gameplay there is to see."

          "Seriously - how many [versions of Solitaire] are just the same [game] over and over again with different graphics? ...but by [the time you've put one card on top of another] you've pretty much seen all the gameplay there is to see."

          "Seriou

    • by BlueCodeWarrior (638065) <steevk@gmail.com> on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:50PM (#25778933) Homepage

      Disclaimer: I used to play WoW.

      This is still interesting news to anyone that follows games. World of Warcraft is one of the most popular video games ever. I know several people who don't play video games, but they do play WoW. To hear about how some people absolutely demolished the new content is pretty cool. Blizzard spent how much time making this expansion, and then it all got run through in less than 30 hours? That's nuts.

      • by xouumalperxe (815707) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @02:55PM (#25779347)

        Blizzard spent how much time making this expansion, and then it all got run through in less than 30 hours? That's nuts.

        Nobody "ran it through" in under 30 hours. What some people did was say "we beat what we consider the important bits, so we call the game beat". A good analogy would perhaps be completing the Terran campaign in Starcraft and saying "I beat the game, because what matters to me is the Terran campaign". SK/Nihilum probably skipped much of the "leveling" content, decidedly skipped most instances, and rushed straight into the raid game.

      • by EvolutionsPeak (913411) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:06PM (#25779407)

        They didn't demolish new content. They demolished content they've been playing for months on the beta server.

        • by cratermoon (765155) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @04:18PM (#25779865) Homepage
          Mod Parent up. For whatever cracked reason, these guys took their guild to the beta server and spent hours and days learning the content and getting them cleared. To say they conquered all the raid content in 3 days ignores that they already knew how to do it, they just repeated it "live". Anyway, good for them, with the completion of all the starting raid content by unrealistic obsessives, we can now start paying attention to the progression of the guilds that still live in the real world and started learning the content from live release day.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by _Sprocket_ (42527)

        Disclaimer: I used to play WoW.

        I know several people who don't play video games, but they do play WoW. ...

        To hear about how some people absolutely demolished the new content is pretty cool. Blizzard spent how much time making this expansion, and then it all got run through in less than 30 hours? That's nuts.

        Pssst. If your friends are playing WoW, they're playing a video game. Don't tell them though. It might upset some emotional balance and put them in to shock.

        Also - note that WoW is not linear. They did not go the same path as everyone else. They did not do everything that everyone else has done. Blizzard's time spent making the expansion was not wasted on 30hrs of grinding.

        That people will take knowledge gained from Beta and apply it to a streamlined race to hit a particular goal isn't all that new.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by merreborn (853723)

      Please keep me informed whenever anyone else makes it to level 80, I really don't want to miss any of their important in game breakthroughs.

      Stuff that matters, indeed.

      This actually represents a very important (albeit not new) lesson to MMO developers: you can spend months designing new content, but players will grind through much of it in hours or days, regardless.

      It's *very* important for fledgling MMO designers to understand that. Many times, single-player and small-scale multiplayer game designers have

  • Addicts indeed (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Uglypug (1309973) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @12:59PM (#25778581)
    It's always comforting to be reminded that there are people out there with even less of a life than you.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Amen. To all you wow players: Shut that computer down and go out get some fresh air. Life is much too short to waste it on playing a bloody game.

      And this comes from someone who made quite a bit of money writing games.

      • by philspear (1142299) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @02:11PM (#25779057)

        Amen. To all you wow players: Shut that computer down and go out get some fresh air. Life is much too short to waste it on playing a bloody game.

        And this comes from someone who is posting to slashdot on his laptop as he is skiing down K2 being chased by ninjas while nailing the new Bond chick.

        Fixed that little bit of hypocrisy there for you.

      • Re:Addicts indeed (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Trubadidudei (1404187) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @02:58PM (#25779361)

        *Sigh*

        The expression "life" has gotten some funny co-notations these days.
        Today, it is possible to not have a "life" actually, and being judged to "waste" it by doing something someone infected with clichés and stereotypes doesn't understand.

        I'm not really referring to the OP here, as it looks like his post is something that should have been modded "Funny", but was modded "Insightful" by people who misunderstand what he was saying. But to you who are so stuck up in your romantic ideas that you believe that what you define as "fresh air" holds some sort of magical spell that makes everything so much better and morally "correct", let me tell you something:

        Life is not short, life is not long. Life is life, and everyone, wether they never go out of their basement, or got a nobel price, are equally successful at it. In the end were all corpses, and all the memes and ideas we thought were so meaningful disappear with the rest of your consciousness.
        Now, stop looking down at people, any people, and especially wow players. By many of the ways that you think you can measure success, they are more successful then you. They socialize more then you do, albeit in a different environment, they have more of what you define as "fun" then you do, although some are more or less mentally addicted to some of the notions with the game. Your narrow minded definition of what is good and what is bad is simply wrong, and just because you don't understand that socialization is not something that disappears just because one does not only do it in what you and others paradoxically termed "Real Life", you are not in any measure generally more successful then those who do play an MMORPG. You are as little and as much meaningful as everyone else, and you are by no means justified in judging others as "wasting" what you call "Life".

        *Sigh of relief*

        Now that that is out of the way, let me say that i do not hate you, the person to which i reply. I hate the mindset of which that statement generally belongs. Although what i am saying is somewhat paradoxical as i am actually judging people when expressing my emotions about one type of judgement, i felt that this approach was best to get my feelings about that statement across.

        And for the record, i played WoW since launch, quitting a year ago. When the last of my IRL friends decided to quit i quit as well, and left an avatar to which i had devoted much time, some of the nicest people i had ever met, and an universe in which i had had a much more rewarding experience than i ever would have had if i never would have played at all. During my WoW playing period, i still went out with my friends, i did not fail at school, and i still went to and arranged parties, even though i didn't find them very fun. However I recognized that i wanted to expand my social network, and socializing "IRL" was by no means something that i was bad at.

        Please, abandon the idea that playing WoW equates to the lack of "Life", and that "life" can in fact be lacked. Throw it in a dumpster, smash it with a spade and please set it on fire, and while your at it, throw some of the ideas that that meme brings with as well, especially the idea that fresh air is and has been better then it's opposite (whatever that is).
        Such ideas just make me so angry, and forces me to post long inflammatory and self righteous posts on a comment section that would otherwise be filled with WoW speak, which is really quite embarrassing.

    • Re:Addicts indeed (Score:4, Insightful)

      by gparent (1242548) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:58PM (#25778983)
      It's always comforting to be reminded that some people are stupid enough to still think playing WoW somehow prevents you from going outside and having fun with friends.
      • by Korin43 (881732)
        I think when you beat* an expansion in 3 days, it's safe to say you're a little obsessed..

        *I realize you can't really "beat" WoW, but getting to the max level and clearing all of the dungeons is pretty much the most you can do.
        • by SQLGuru (980662)

          Actually, it just frees up MORE of his time to spend with friends. Everyone else will spend weeks or months to get there. During those weeks and months, he could be hanging out with friends (at least with friends who aren't spending weeks and months beating WoW).

          Layne

      • Re:Addicts indeed (Score:4, Insightful)

        by wbren (682133) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:17PM (#25779471) Homepage

        In my experience--based solely on the people I know that play WoW, not necessarily on the stories you read online--the likelihood of Wow at least *interfering* with your social life is pretty high. You might decide not to go out with some friends one night because you're just so close to leveling up or completing a quest. That might sound like a really minor problem, but it adds up. The probability of it interfering increasing significantly if you are a member of a raiding guild. Since raiders are the people mentioned in the blurb, I think the OP's point was valid. He didn't even seem to be criticizing all WoW players, just those who rush out to "beat" the expansion quicker than anyone else.

        Remember, there are exceptions to every rule. Some people that use cocaine do so without any noticeable negative side effects on their lives. A lot of the time, however, there are very bad, very noticeable side effects socially, physically, and financially. I know that's an over the top example, but I think the same is true of WoW. You might be an exception, and if so, that's great. But just because you continue to thrive despite playing WoW doesn't mean others are as lucky. Something to keep in mind, that's all...

        • by gparent (1242548)
          If you let WoW interfere with your social life, you would've let anything else do it anyway. I know a lot of friends who play WoW, and I played WoW myself (and stopped for a few months at times, currently my account isn't active) and it is really easy to just ask your raid leader "Hey, I have friends calling me, do you have somebody to replace me?".

          Of course, sometimes, the answer was no. And you'll go raid because you need to. But is that really me catering to the game and purposely crippling social life
        • The probability of it interfering increasing significantly if you are a member of a raiding guild.

          It's going to depend on your guild and your (other) friends. I don't think raiding one night a week is particularly bad. Other people, however, have a negative attitude toward a video game as an obligation. For comparison, would you think anything negative if I said: no I can't go party Wednesday, I have a basketball game and an obligation to my team. Say the same thing about WoW and many people would think there's something wrong with you, but there's really not that much of a difference.

    • by vitaflo (20507)

      It's always comforting to be reminded that there are people out there with even less of a life than you.

      It should be mentioned that the guild who did this are professional gamers. They get paid to play WoW. In essence, they're just doing their job.

  • 65 hours... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Kjella (173770) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:00PM (#25778583) Homepage

    Not to be outdone, a guild named "TwentyFifthNovember" managed to get at least 25 raiders to 80 and then cleared all of the current expansion raid content less than three days after the launch

    They should make them twice as strong as they're "supposed to" be, and drop them say 5% each day. I'd make that competition last so much longer and frustrate these raidoholics, lol.

    • Re:65 hours... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Austerity Empowers (669817) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:20PM (#25778713)

      That's actually an idea I've been campaigning for. These raiding guilds like to show off how great they are, yet they're just incredibly dedicated. Your average guild can't even get people to log in for scheduled events on time.

      So up the ante, make the raids insanely hard even for pro's. Make them unfair (like Naxx), require a distorted balance of classes, designed to engender social infighting. Give them some really hard problems to overcome inside and outside the game. Plant a few CSR "reps" in these guilds, have them create chaos, fan the flames of egos. Basically get them to play the game like normal people so the dev's can focus on the 99%, not the 1%.

      Then gradually ease up as your main player base starts to reach the top. "Patch" content that was "harder than anticipated", etc.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by vux984 (928602)

        That's actually an idea I've been campaigning for. These raiding guilds like to show off how great they are, yet they're just incredibly dedicated. Your average guild can't even get people to log in for scheduled events on time.

        Right. The Raid game is warped... its the only part of wow that isn't a tedious grind, and most of the players can't access it due to the fact that its unrealistic for most people to organize into groups that large, and schedule their lives around hooking up with these guys. Its the

  • Rush to completion (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Dutch Gun (899105) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:01PM (#25778593)

    I've never understood people who feel the need to rush to complete game content. After paying for a game, I like to take my time and enjoy it. I guess maybe people see it as another way of competing with each other? Or is it just obsession?

    Maybe I have a slightly different perspective than most. I'm a game developer, so I guess I'm slightly more aware than most of how much work goes into every single game. It's slightly depressing sometimes, because you've put a year or more of work into a product, and you've still only produced enough content to last a long weekend.

  • ...savoring long-awaited new content. Seems like a rather ephemeral achievement.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:09PM (#25778645)

    ...and I really enjoyed BC when it launched, but not as much as I first enjoyed the launch. I thought about getting The Frozen Throne, but this kind of behavior on my server, which I'm expected to emulate in order to enjoy 80% of Blizzard's 'Content', has made me realize this generation of MMOs is not for me.

    MMO developers cite limited budgets as their reason for not being able to make "better MMOs." Blizzard, however makes approx $15 a month from each of its 10 Million players. Effectively, their revenues are higher than most MMO's entire budget, every month. The truth is, MMO publishers *cough vivendi cough* have come to realize that MMOs make the most money when they emulate casinos. A pleasant, polished atmosphere with lots of slot machines where someone is "winning" every second, and there's constant reminders of that. Who'd ever want to leave?

    So please, if you ever meet me, and I say that I don't think WoW is a "good game," please keep in mind that Jackpot machines are also "good games."

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Faluzeer (583626)

      "Blizzard, however makes approx $15 a month from each of its 10 Million players.".

      Hmmm

      There are approx 11 million WoW subscribers (all active according to Blizzard), the $15 is only the average amount paid per month by Western gamers. The majority of those 11 million subscribers are in China / SE Asia, and they do not pay flat monthly fee, instead they are charged on a per hour basis.

    • by ahodgson (74077)

      The new quests and instances seem pretty well done, from what I've seen so far. *shrug*. I'm in it to raid and spend time with friends. If you don't like it, don't play.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by duckInferno (1275100)
      The difference is that WoW will cost you less per year than a fortnightly trip to the pub for a few drinks.

      Or an A+ game title every couple of months (good luck stretching those out that long).

      Or a monthly trip to the movies with popcorn.
  • Boredom (Score:3, Informative)

    by De Lemming (227104) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @01:30PM (#25778779) Homepage

    So the Lich King didn't have to twiddle his thumbs [ctrlaltdel-online.com] for long...

    And there's also a Ctrl-Alt-Del "silly" [ctrlaltdel-online.com] on the new WoW expansion.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by drsquare (530038)

      Why have you sullied this site with the worst, unfunniest web comic of all time?

      B^U

  • Well at least there will be loads of good gear up in the AH real quick.
  • by nick_davison (217681) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @02:27PM (#25779169)

    If you look at the speedrun subculture, people can "complete" most classic, deeply loved, games in ridiculously short amounts of time.

    Does it devalue Doom to tens of millions of players, many of whom logged hundreds or thousands of hours in it, knowing that someone's managed a speedrun in an hour or two?

    Besides, modern MMOs are about a huge number of things interacting:

    Have they looted enough of the highest level drops that their players are now fully kitted out in the best gear available? Or did they just scrape by with enough to claim they could do it, only to get slapped down in PvP, next week, by a guild that didn't claim "completion" and is now better equipped?

    Have they collected everything they need for their crafters to make the highest end items they also had opened up to them?

    Have they gained the new mounts?

    How about PvP specific loot? Have they gained the full sets of that stuff that were put there for the huge number of players that don't consider level 80 and a few raids to be the pinacle of the game?

    And that's all before you get in to the broader culture of a game like that... mapping things out, raising interesting alts, side quests, etc.

    A junior high bully gets to claim he's the most awesomest by having no one who can beat him in a fight. Yet the kids who're on dates, getting in to bands, on the sports teams, even nerdier stuff like winning science olympiads or actually understanding their classes so they'll get great grades in highschool, a great college place and be much better off in life... they're probably not all that impressed that, yes, he got to the top on a single axis. Did he really "complete" junior high as he likes to tell himself?

  • by Lordfly (590616) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @02:40PM (#25779263) Homepage Journal

    ...I just gotta say they missed most of the fun of the game.

    Granted, I have one character, a level 36 Warlock, that's taken me something like 3 months to get up to. But you know what? I'm probably having a bit more fun and getting more for my money than the people who have to powerlevel to 80 as fast as possible.

    It makes PvP harder for me (as I can't compete with people who twink their guys out with the best gear), and I generally don't go into the instances/raids (I solo most of the time, and my guild is more social than goal-driven), but I get to actually enjoy the art, the people, the economy, and the experience.

    Getting to 80 as fast as possible is like trying to ride every single ride at Cedar Point as fast and as efficiently as possible, as opposed to a group of friends who go on what they want when they want.

    Which group has more "fun"?

    • Some people like playing, and some people like getting good. I do not like the playing part so much, which is why I quit playing WoW after a full day at level 20. I felt like it was a grind, and didn't feel like I was getting better at anything. If I were at level 36 after 3 months, well, I think I would have hated every minute of it.

      I would imagine that these level 80s would not have fun playing the game like you apparently do. To each their own, and all that good shit.

    • Get quest helper (Score:3, Informative)

      by unity100 (970058)
      the "Quest Helper" addon from wow.curse.com will make sure that you spend less time finding where things are, and spend your time for experiencing them instead.
  • Not hard (Score:3, Insightful)

    by burris (122191) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:02PM (#25779379)

    If the game was too hard, most people would get frustrated and quit. Then Blizzard wouldn't make any money. Instead you get a regular reinforcement schedule that keeps you paying the bills. B. F. Skinner would have loved these things.

  • by antdude (79039) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:28PM (#25779527) Homepage Journal

    See here [ucomics.com]. Pwned!

  • by Cookie3 (82257) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @03:36PM (#25779579) Homepage

    This story is not news.

    TwentyFifthNovember is a guild made up of Nihilum and SK-Gaming (aka Curse). Both guilds had members that experienced Naxxramas at level 60 (when it was originally released), and most of the bosses in Naxxramas (retuned and re-released for level 80) are largely unchanged since that time. Both of these guilds had very significant presences in the Closed Beta, where this raid content was available for anyone who could gather enough players. Many of them killed these bosses for weeks and months, before the game went live. The slight differences between these bosses at level 60 versus these bosses at level 80 is minor enough that even those who DIDN'T see the retuned content would still know how to get past it.

    Raiding in World of Warcraft is more about skill than gear (although there are a few hard gear checks, such as needing 8.5k HP to survive Naj'entus area-effect nuke). These guys certainly are skillful, but there was never any doubt that they would steamroll all of this content as soon as they hit 80. The slightly bigger concern is that they managed to get 25 members to level 80 in ~65 hours of gameplay. Still, with the first 80 after 27 hours, it wasn't unexpected. People were hitting level 70 in Burning Crusade in about the same amount of time, and once the strategy for doing so was optimized, anyone (with a lot of time, and/or friends) could grind out the levels.

    One thing to note is that these guys don't yet have the ultra-rare achievement awards, for example:
    http://www.wowhead.com/?achievement=2138 [wowhead.com]

    Heroic Glory of the Raider involves a series of moderate to very hard challenges in Naxx, with the reward being an exclusive Proto-Drake mount. Until they get that, it's not news.. and even if they do get that, they've STILL got the qualifiers mentioned earlier.

  • Nymh banned... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by meuhlavache (1101089) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @05:37PM (#25780409) Homepage
    According to some players Nymh is banned cause due to some bad tricks. With others people from his guild he manage to hit mobs (monsters) the first and let his friends finish it. First to touch, first to get the XP... Good cheat but bad idea, Blizzard catch Nymh and now it's finnish for him. :)
  • Hooray! (Score:3, Funny)

    by Greyfox (87712) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @07:35PM (#25781083) Homepage Journal
    You got your entire guild to 80 and finished the end of game content. Back to gold farming until the next expansion...
  • by unity100 (970058) on Sunday November 16, 2008 @09:46PM (#25781813) Homepage Journal
    In every game there are people who take it way seriously. i know that a percentage of people have prepared for this launch, planning, plotting, gathering resources to be the first at something, including levels. since wow now has an achievement system, every kind of zit you succeed gets recorded. not only reaching level 80 first. hence the rush.

    these people are powergamers. they do it with an attitude more serious than any job they work in. take turns and do whatnot. and a goodly number of them are beta testers, so already know what to do at what certain point. AND if they didnt get to level 80 in 15 hours, they would get to it in 3 days if it was way tougher, or if they didnt already clear the content in 3 days, they would do it in 3 weeks. it wouldnt matter for them.

    but the thing is, those people are SO in the minority among 18 million wow players that, what they do does not matter. for majority of that 18 million, which are mainly casual gamers, or gamers with scarce time in their hands (as many gamers mature in age, their life responsibilities weigh more).

    wow was WAY too tough for those people. not because they were stupid or lacked the capacity or 'skills' - as many powergamer cunts use in wow jargon - or anything - the casuals would not see WORKING for 4 hours a night for farming some boss in order to get an item that will better their gear with 2.5 %, SO that they will be better equipped to deal with a higher boss in another instance, and the gamers with responsibilities (grown ups) were short of time, being able to put only 4-5 hours a week to the game.

    this 'easiness' of new wow content will make sure that these people, who are actually the bulk of the subscribers, will be able to see end game content. this matters. because these people are the people paying the majority of the funds for this game, and providing for keep up of all those servers, personnel and development costs.

    powergamers are getting the shaft with this expansion. and fortunately so, for the sake of any game, they should indeed get the shaft. its way stupid torturing and alienating millions of players for the sake of satisfying a small percentage of achievement deranged powergamer individuals - that approach has sunk many games in the past.

God may be subtle, but he isn't plain mean. -- Albert Einstein

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