Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Cellphones Portables (Apple) Portables (Games) Entertainment Games Hardware

iPhone Gaming Continues To Grow 131

Posted by Soulskill
from the hope-they-still-fit dept.
1Up reports that the popularity of gaming on smartphones is growing, particularly on the iPhone. In fact, gaming on portable devices is growing even at home, where users presumably have access to more powerful platforms. CNN points out that the developer for Trism, one of the first popular games, has raked in over $250,000 in profits through the App Store. Apple exec Bob Borchers and various game developers recently discussed the future of games on the iPhone. "Patrick Gunn, director of marketing for EA Mobile, showcased Need for Speed Undercover, which will be available next month. Gunn says that EA has 'taken full advantage of all of the unique elements ... like touch, flick, accelerometer, and motion sensitivity' — and graphically, the game appears to be roughly on par with a PSP title."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

iPhone Gaming Continues To Grow

Comments Filter:
  • Sorry Apple (Score:3, Funny)

    by nawcom (941663) on Thursday November 20, 2008 @12:33AM (#25828643) Homepage
    I'm not getting an iPhone until I know Frontal Assault [xmunkki.org] has been ported. Until then, eat my shorts Steve!
  • by deft (253558) on Thursday November 20, 2008 @12:44AM (#25828697) Homepage

    I'm not suprised its "growing" faster ...because at the home gaming has been around for years and is highly saturated, popular, and is now just pushing out slowly after its major strides.

    Smartphone gaming is new, and has everywhere to go now, being pretty darn new.

    If phone gaming can approach at home gaming, then that will be news.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by renegadesx (977007)
      Exactly, mobile phone gaming was very cheap and flimsy until very recently, now we are seeing phones that can churn out some ok visuals.

      Last gen you had the PS2 alone rack up over 140 Million units, then the Gamecube and Xbox racking about 24 Million each plus Gameboy Advance.

      The N-Gage had alot of potential but was held back by design issues like taco looking side talking, game slot underneath the battery and screen taller than it was wide. Otherwise if you had a phone more like shaped more like Ga
      • The iphone doesn't have hardware buttons.

        It sucks for most games as a result.

        Tactile feedback is a must for most games.

        • by Graff (532189) on Thursday November 20, 2008 @03:13AM (#25829551)

          The iphone doesn't have hardware buttons.
          It sucks for most games as a result.
          Tactile feedback is a must for most games.

          Actually, it doesn't suck and it's not a must when you are talking about games on the iPhone.

          You need tactile feedback when you are looking at a screen and your hands are not in view. If you are playing on an Xbox, computer, or a similar device then tactile feedback is important because it's incredibly difficult to watch both the screen and your hands at the same time.

          Playing a game on an iPhone is very different since your input device and the screen is the same object. You can easily see exactly where you are putting your fingers and still follow the game action. Not only that but since a lot of games involve tilting and moving the iPhone you do get tactile feedback, albeit a different kind of feedback from how a button would feel. Many games are also taking advantage of the vibrate feature of the iPhone to provide tactile feedback.

          There are tons of cool, fun, and definitely viable games that thrive on the iPhone despite the lack of physical buttons. It's a completely different gaming experience and the old saw of tactile feedback being necessary for games just doesn't apply.

          • I don't have the iPhone, but iPod Touch. iPhone without the phone. And initially I was VERY VERY skeptical of the iPhone paradigm.

            Now I am totally amazed... Apple hit this one right out of the park. I was very very critical on this topic and have said so. But I was wrong.

          • by Dan East (318230) on Thursday November 20, 2008 @08:05AM (#25830699) Homepage Journal

            The iPhone comes out, and suddenly everyone forgets that touch-screen devices of the exact same form factor have been around for over a decade. All of this has been hashed and rehashed. I ported Wolfenstein 3D, Quake 1 & 2, and a Gameboy emulator to Pocket PC, as well as doing extensive game development on new projects. For analog input, touchscreens are okay. However for binary input, aka fire / jump buttons, d-pad, etc, it sucks tremendously. I think you're confusing "tactile feedback" for "knowing where the virtual button is". It's not just about knowing where to hold your thumbs, but knowing that you've pressed the button hard enough to trigger it. The very first ARM Pocket PC, the Compaq iPaq, which had the horsepower and RAM to do some serious gaming (like run Quake), had a terrible design flaw. The D-Pad and 4 hardware buttons all resided on a daughterboard with its own microcontroller. Some bone-headed engineer had a serious lack of foresight, and the hardware was designed such that only one switch could register at a time. Thus if you were holding the D-Pad in a direction, then none of the 4 hardware buttons would register.

            So the only solution to make things like Gameboy emulators playable was to throw virtual A and B buttons up on the screen. These were of course huge, so finding them wasn't a problem. However I can tell you that playing games like that, without real tactile response, sucks, sucks, sucks.

            There's a reason that the Timex Sinclair's membrane keyboard didn't catch on back in the 80s, and why to this day people like the big IBM keyboards that you can hear click half way across the room when a button is pressed.

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by Graff (532189)

              The iPhone comes out, and suddenly everyone forgets that touch-screen devices of the exact same form factor have been around for over a decade. All of this has been hashed and rehashed. I ported Wolfenstein 3D, Quake 1 & 2, and a Gameboy emulator to Pocket PC, as well as doing extensive game development on new projects. For analog input, touchscreens are okay. However for binary input, aka fire / jump buttons, d-pad, etc, it sucks tremendously. I think you're confusing "tactile feedback" for "knowing where the virtual button is". It's not just about knowing where to hold your thumbs, but knowing that you've pressed the button hard enough to trigger it.

              First of all, the iPhone uses a capacitive touchscreen. This means that next to no pressure is needed to press a virtual button so there is very little need for feedback when you press a virtual button. The iPhone's screen is also multi-touch and has a high touch resolution and it can accurately measure the size and shape of the areas pressed.

              Secondly, the algorithms that the iPhone uses to measure where you pressed are very advanced. The iPhone puts all this additional data to good use and it can accura

              • This means that next to no pressure is needed to press a virtual button so there is very little need for feedback when you press a virtual button.

                Way to miss the point. This is like saying it's OK for blind people to drive, but only in pitch darkness with the headlights off.

                What that actually means is that there's no way to have tactile feedback on that hardware, not that there's no need for it. Sure, there are other kinds of feedback - audible, visual - but the great thing about tactile feedback is that

                • by Altus (1034)

                  I think the point that the poster was trying to make is that the tactile feedback is your finger touching a surface.

                  I think the idea here is that rather than resting your fingers on buttons and then getting tactile feedback from pushing them you hold your finger just above the screen and the tactile feedback is from your finger touching the screen.

                  If there is no doubt that a slight touch will trigger the action then that should be enough tactile feedback for a button press.

                  Sometimes in technology things cha

                  • by iamhassi (659463)
                    "Sometimes in technology things change. There was a time when people thought that big joy sticks were the only way to interact with a game and D-pads (or even thumb joysticks) were a terrible idea."

                    think tactile feedback will be around awhile. I don't see touch screens replacing keyboards for long time, and I don't see touchscreens replacing buttons on controllers anytime soon.
                  • by Graff (532189)

                    I think the point that the poster was trying to make is that the tactile feedback is your finger touching a surface.

                    This is one of my points. My main point is that the iPhone has inspired many other ways of providing tactile input. How about using the tilt of the device as input, making it feel like you are using a steering wheel in a racing game. Or holding the device and tilting it like one of those old put-the-ball-in-the-hole games in order to move your character through a maze. Or shaking the device at certain points in the game to do a special attack. Or using the current orientation of the device as the direc

                    • by RMH101 (636144)
                      "How about using the tilt of the device as input, making it feel like you are using a steering wheel in a racing game"

                      Man, I had a Quickshot joystick back in the 80s that worked this way with my ZX Spectrum. Used mercury tilt switches. It was cool'n'all but sucked in use.

                      Asphalt racing on the iPhone looks nice graphically, but steering the car by tilting or by using the onscreen, non-tactile steering wheel, also sucks.

                      If you want to be able to reliably press buttons whilst directing your attention a

            • by samkass (174571)

              I'm trying to determine whether to put any credence in what you posted, and to that end I have to ask: have you actually tried developing for the iPhone, or is all your experience with previous-generation touch screens?

    • i am acutaly very supprised because the same companies that have the stay-at-home games also have released a handheld gaming system and they usaly do well with the younger age groups (its hard to make a violent game on a 2 inch screen) but now that games have come out for the iPhone they seem to be taking off. (i jailbroke my iTouch mounths ago so i had games when others did not so i feel sort of wierd)
      • by Altus (1034)

        Adults wont buy a PSP or a DS but they already wanted an iPhone.

        The gaming market on the iPhone is likely to be a good one to exploit, especially for casual games because your not counting on people spending 200 bucks on a portable gaming system. Instead you are exploiting the fact that many have already spent 200 bucks on an iPhone.

        I have been waiting for gaming on phones to take off here. I think the iPhone and the next gen of smart phones that it has inspired might just be the platform to do it.

        • by mdwh2 (535323)

          Although you could say exactly the same thing with "phone" instead of "Iphone". Phones have been doing games for years - and one would expect games to get more advanced, and gaming on phones to become more popular. I'm not sure why it's suddenly news just because Apple show up late to the party.

          • by Altus (1034)

            Because the iPhone is a much better game platform than many of the phones that have come before. Its a very popular phone so there is a large installed base and previous phones which had good gaming were targeted at gamers (a small installed base) rather than at everyone like the iPhone is.

            Its not because its apple, its because someone finally made a popular phone that was a good gaming device instead of only getting half of the equation right for this market to grow.

  • It's more convenient (Score:2, Informative)

    by rubypossum (693765)
    I don't have an iPhone (I've got an N95) but I have noticed that I play more games on my mobile then on my XBox or PC. Mainly because it's always available and it's easier to get addicted to a game. Also, the mobile graphics have gotten good enough (at least on a small screen) that there's not really any reason to bother. With 8Gb of storage you can have some fairly immersive games.
  • Sure... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Quantos (1327889)
    Gaming grows, but when is the breakthrough in battery life gonna hit?

    Why do people want to do things with a PHONE that will make it so that they can't use it as a PHONE?

    Hang on, I was playing a game and my batteries dying.
    How often have we all heard that one.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Why do people want to do things with a PHONE that will make it so that they can't use it as a PHONE?

      You've seriously never had a situation where you were idling, wishing you brought a book? Say, waiting at a dentist's office or during a 45min break between classes because of scheduling issues?

      Having entertainment on-hand can be pretty damn useful, even if it comes at the cost of limiting the phone's usefulness before the next charge. Pre-smartphone I did my best to keep a book on my person 24/7, but now I can just pull out my blackberry and browse slashdot et al, even though that eats into my battery

      • Say, waiting at a dentist's office or during a 45min break between classes because of scheduling issues?

        Here in the UK, they ask you to turn your mobile phone off when waiting in a surgery for a doctor or dentist whereas I've never been asked to put my book away.

        • by randyest (589159)
          Two words: airplane mode.

          Turns off all the radios and possible sources of interference and still lets you play games.
  • Scratch the gaming news I think the real story here is how 1UP got their hands on an iPhone that has Flash installed.

    Please can somebody tell me where I too can get a copy of Flash, I need to look at redtube NOWWWWWWWW

  • Trism is done by the same guy who translated and did romhacking for the NES and SNES.

    God ol Neo Demiforce still at it, after all these years.

  • Thanks to Mono! (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Unity3D and Mono seem to be making it easier for developers to write games for the iPhone, this is just awesome.

    Especially since Unity3D will be ported to Linux afaik.

  • Looking at the iPhone and the new Nintedo DSi, I was surprised to see that the DSi did not include motion sensing technology. Maybe the DSi2 will end up having it, since IMHO this is going to become a big part of mobile gaming.

3500 Calories = 1 Food Pound

Working...