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Amazon.com To Accept Game Trade-Ins 242

Posted by timothy
from the this-game-sucks-you-try-it dept.
revjtanton writes "Amid all the discussion and argument about Gamestop's two-billion-dollar trade-in industry it seems Amazon.com is getting in on the action. Like Gamestop, Amazon asks for the games to be in good condition, however they offer just a few more dollars for your discarded game (Gamestop listed Left 4 Dead for the 360 at $24 while Amazon had it at $26.50 trade-in value). Gamestop had already ruffled feathers in the developer and distribution communities with its practice of accepting used games; does Amazon joining the practice legitimize it?"
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Amazon.com To Accept Game Trade-Ins

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  • hmm? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by FredFredrickson (1177871) * on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:28PM (#27081905) Homepage Journal
    Although Gamestop already "ruffled features" in the dev and distribution communities, I'd say what really legitimizes the practice of buying and selling used games is the First Sale Doctrine [wikipedia.org].

    That's like saying freedom of speech is only legitimate if everybody agrees with what you say... It's really quite different. It's legalized legitimacy is in the face of the fact that people disagree.
    • *feathers. You get it.
    • Re:hmm? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by houstonbofh (602064) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:31PM (#27081947)
      But they don't sell it to you, they "license" it. And if they keep saying it, it will be true. Just like me having a replica of something you also still have is "stealing" it from you when you still have it.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by hansamurai (907719)

        Whether you own it or not is one thing, but no publisher or developer has successfully argued that you do not have the right to resell a physical, original copy of a game.

        • Re:hmm? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by vux984 (928602) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:48PM (#27082173)

          Whether you own it or not is one thing, but no publisher or developer has successfully argued that you do not have the right to resell a physical, original copy of a game.

          They don't need to make the argument if they can prevent me from doing it by technical means instead. Its the whole "What good is a phone call if you are unable to speak?" situation.

          I bought both portal and lost planet, in a box, with a disc, at a store. Do I have the right to resell them? Sure, do, but who ever buys them can't use them. The activation key is already used up, tied to my steam account.

          And I can't move a title out of my steam account. Either I hand over the password/login and all the games in it, or I don't. There is no way to separate out a title and say, here, this isn't mine anymore, and re-enable the activation key for someone else.

          Hell, per the EULA I can't even give the entire steam account away. (Not that I'd want to because I still want -some- of the games.)

          So, even if I do have the right to resell them, what good is it? I can't meaningfully exercise it.

          • They don't need to make the argument if they can prevent me from doing it by technical means instead.

            Thus far, they haven't done so with console games. Gamestop has only dealt in used console games for years, and a quick glance at amazon page shows they only appear to be reselling console games as well. TFS fails to mention this. Why do people constantly act as if PC gaming doesn't exist?

            It would be a real shame if next gen, devs get their way and it moves all to digital downloads, specifically because then there's no way to buy a game used, and they will have effectively moved us to a leasing system.

            • ... I meant to say "moves all to digital downloads for consoles." Way to complain about speaking as if PC gaming doesn't exist and then apperantly do it myself in the same post...

            • by Dare nMc (468959)

              if next gen, devs get their way and it moves all to digital downloads,

              currently the cost of the new game is $60, used is $50. So first sale person costs $35 for the time they had the game, then it costs $25 for each additional cycle (through gamestop anyway)
              if downloaded games are $15 then all could win, because of the reduced costs associated, and additional sales... (or charge say $25 and allow the transfer of downloaded games)

              • Re:hmm? (Score:5, Informative)

                by interkin3tic (1469267) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:53PM (#27083125)

                currently the cost of the new game is $60, used is $50

                Uh... not sure where you're getting those numbers, but that's innacurate. If you were to buy a game on release day for $60, open it, and then sell it right back, they'd put it on the shelf for $55. If you were to buy the game on release, wait two months, and then sell it back, they might put it at $50 if it was a good game that still had demand, $30 if it were an average game. A game that is 2 years old that is good, more like $20. If it's average (like madden,) it will be more like $5.

                The quality of the game factors into its used price.

          • Re:hmm? (Score:5, Informative)

            by poena.dare (306891) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:35PM (#27082827)

            Your concise summary is exactly why I refuse to use Steam or any service like it.

          • Well, if you've got a lot of time and/or money on your hands, sue them. Has this ever made it into the court system to have it determined what the law actually says on the subject? I would think that if the law says you are allowed to sell a copy of the game, it would be against that law to prevent the re-sale.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by vux984 (928602)

              I would think that if the law says you are allowed to sell a copy of the game, it would be against that law to prevent the re-sale.

              That's the problem. They won't stop me from selling it to a new owner. They've just set it up, so that there is no point, because the new owner can't do anything with it. There is nothing 'illegal' about it, and so there is really nothing to challenge them on.

              Essentially, they are selling you a 'consumable activation ticket' with your media and box. You can resell it all you wan

          • You willingly put those games into the same account with other games when you could have created a seperate steam account for each game or package you bought.

            I had a steam account with the original Half-life and all of the mods. When Half-Life 2 came out I purchased the Silver Package (HL2 plus CS:S and DOD:S) and put it on a seperate account. I put Portal on a new account as well.

            It sounds annoying but it is not much different from putting in a different disc or cartridge into your console.

            It may be agains

            • by exploder (196936)

              So what happens when Steam starts enforcing their EULA? Talk about foresight...

            • by vux984 (928602)

              You willingly put those games into the same account with other games when you could have created a seperate steam account for each game or package you bought.

              Actually I've been doing this for quite a while now. It is indeed the best solution I can find. But its a clumsy work around, not a proper solution.

              It sounds annoying but it is not much different from putting in a different disc or cartridge into your console.

              It becomes quite a bit more annoying if you try and use some of the online friend services etc

        • by e2d2 (115622)

          And this is exactly why they are starting to move to a "activation" model where you are activated remotely. Mo money mo money mo money.

      • by Firehed (942385)

        They can say whatever the fuck they want. A physical product is changing hands - only one person can use it at a time. Does this piss off publishers? Absolutely, but no more than my selling a used book pisses off book publishers. Will they try to stop it using technical means? Sure, and every other industry on the planet would love to do the same thing, it's just not feasible. Is it legal for them to do so? That's for the courts to decide when it's tested - I think probably not unless they also exclusiv

        • by vadim_t (324782)

          Will they try to stop it using technical means? Sure, and every other industry on the planet would love to do the same thing, it's just not feasible.

          It's very feasible and very easy. First they will require you to create an account with them. Then they will require registering your serial number, which at that instant will fail to register at any other account.

          To discourage the use of multiple accounts, they may make it difficult to create multiple ones (checking by credit card number for instance). They'll

      • But they don't sell it to you, they "license" it. And if they keep saying it, it will be true. Just like me having a replica of something you also still have is "stealing" it from you when you still have it.

        Then perhaps it is time to stop licensing and start selling. And a "friend" as big as Amazon might be just the thing to stop the nonsense. going further and further.

        • But they don't sell it to you, they "license" it. And if they keep saying it, it will be true. Just like me having a replica of something you also still have is "stealing" it from you when you still have it.

          Then perhaps it is time to stop licensing and start selling. And a "friend" as big as Amazon might be just the thing to stop the nonsense. going further and further.

          I agree. That is why I don't "rent" software. It does, however, limit my choices considerably.

      • by murdocj (543661)

        Having a copy isn't a problem at all, as long as you purchased it.

        Think about it... game developer spends $10 million creating a game, first person buys one copy for $50, uploads it, everyone else gets theirs for free, game company is out $9,999,950. You really think you aren't stealing when you just grab a copy w/o paying for it?

        • Having a copy isn't a problem at all, as long as you purchased it.

          Think about it... game developer spends $10 million creating a game, first person buys one copy for $50, uploads it, everyone else gets theirs for free, game company is out $9,999,950. You really think you aren't stealing when you just grab a copy w/o paying for it?

          Yep. Just like you aren't stealing when you shoot someone in the head, or drive drunk, or piss in a policeman's hat. You are committing a crime, but it ain't stealing.

          To continue your analogy, if game developer spends $10 million creating a game, first person buys one copy for $50, and writes a review saying it is utter crap, and has draconian DRM, so no one else buys it, and the company is out 9 mill, it still isn't stealing. And in this case, so far, it is still legal. But they are working on it.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by murdocj (543661)

            Somehow, I don't think writing a bad review of a game is the same as taking a copy w/o paying for it, but Slashdot is notorious for bad analogies. Maybe you could work in car theft?

      • Re:hmm? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by digitalunity (19107) <digitalunity@yahoo . c om> on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:45PM (#27082993) Homepage

        Moderators must be high today. While your first line is true, it's not strictly relevant.

        There is no clear cut line for what constitutes a loan, license or sale. Guidelines from the 9th circuit(Wise, 550 F.2d 1189) seem to indicate resale of a copyrighted work by a vendee who has sole control of the work can do so without permission from the copyright holder. The title of the agreement under which the sale or license occurs is not deterministic in revealing if the transaction constitutes a sale.

        This is unlikely to apply to games purchased through Steam, since the copyrighted work still remains under control of the vendor. At most, the vendee would be liable to the copyright holder for breach of contract but the copyright act is not invoked. Even if the first sale doctrine were applicable, it doesn't require Steam to issue activation keys to the new owner of the copy.

    • by von_rick (944421)

      Although Gamestop already "ruffled features" in the dev and distribution communities...

      Forget about the ruffled feathers in the developers and distributors' community - Amazon folks should be more worried about the Furious Girlfriends Association who would hate to see their bf get cheaper versions of games they would play for the next 2 months.

  • Competition is good (Score:5, Informative)

    by Hatta (162192) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:29PM (#27081913) Journal

    I hope this encourages GameStop to try a little harder to not suck.

    • by rob1980 (941751)
      I doubt it, unless Amazon or some other company starts opening store fronts all over the US to compete with Gamestop on their turf.
      • by BrettJB (64947)

        Yeah, I hate not being able to access amazon.com from anywhere in the world...

        You know, what they need is some kind of distributed network, with nodes interconnected with one another, kind of like a web. Yeah, a world wide web, that's the ticket!

        I kid, I kid... You may have a point with people being unwilling to put up with the delay and uncertainty of dropping their used games in the mail, but I doubt it'll dampen the enthusiasm for Amazon's offering much.

        • The bigger problem is not being able to SEE the use product before your buy it...

          If I'm looking for a game and I walk into Gamestop and see they have 2 used copies, 1 looks like it just came out of the shrink wrap and the other looks like a dog chewed up and pissed on the case before completely devouring the manual, they're the same price, guess which one I'm buying?

          Amazon.com has the same 2 games for sale, except all I see is a stock image, guess which one I'm buying? ... who knows it's a crap shoot.
  • It's already legal (and always was). Only the stopping of people doing this is on the rather grey moral ground.

    • It's already legal (and always was). Only the stopping of people doing this is on the rather grey moral ground.

      What? I would think forcing people to dispose of games as opposed to recycling would be the moral bad guy. Or is CarMax the devil? (Aside from the pricing practices)

      • by malkavian (9512) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:56PM (#27082295) Homepage
        Reselling games is recycling.. I usually just give 'em away to friends of mine who can't afford to get every game they want. They do the same to me sometimes. Just keeping the cycle going is a good thing. It's how the world's always worked, and humanity in general did ok out of it. The current trend to force obsolescence/disposal is more than morally grey; it's pretty morally black.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Firehed (942385)

      If reselling my used and unwanted games falls into a moral gray area, we had better start torching any library in sight - the evil communist hideouts! And add yet another reason to hate on used car dealers.

      • by Beardo the Bearded (321478) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:24PM (#27082687)

        Do you think that you'd be able to create a library today if they weren't already historically entrenched?

        I've been buying and selling used games since 1990. It's never been illegal or morally gray. Some licences (which I no longer have to reference) said something along the lines of "you may only sell this game if you remove all copies".

        The game publishers are only squawking about it because they, like the *AA, think that every used copy is a lost sale.

        I buy used games because they charge too much for new games, and almost every new game is a crappy (albeit shinier) copy of a game that came out 10 years ago.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Ioldanach (88584)

          I buy used games because they charge too much for new games, and almost every new game is a crappy (albeit shinier) copy of a game that came out 10 years ago.

          Plus that game that it's a remake of that came out even 5 years ago required the latest and greatest hardware. My latest modest PC makes those old games shine like new again.

  • Good for Steam (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TonyZahn (534930) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:31PM (#27081941) Homepage

    The more place that sell used games this way, the more developers will start moving to services like Steam to protect their revenue.

    • The more place that sell used games this way, the more developers will start moving to services like Steam to protect their revenue.

      And then people will start selling their unlock keys.

    • Re:Good for Steam (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Hatta (162192) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:54PM (#27082277) Journal

      The more developers move to Steam, the less I'm going to buy their games.

    • Re:Good for Steam (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Chyeld (713439) <.moc.liamg. .ta. .dleyhc.> on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:09PM (#27082507)

      And the problem here is what exactly?

      IMO Steam is a perfect alternative to selling/buying your games on physical media. While Steam does work against the used market, it provides sufficent 'pluses' to make up for loss.

      You gain the ability to download the game to any computer and play it, as long as no other computers are logged in as you. You gain the ability to redownload the game as many times as you need. You gain access to things like ingame messenging, even if the game itself didn't have such a system.

      The real problem will be, and it will be a short lived one I promise you, when companies decide to kill the physical media while simultaneously attempting to roll their own digitial distribution system rather than use one of the currently established platforms like Steam. Those games are going to be abandoned by customers and publishers faster than you can say Rumplestilskin.

      • by billcopc (196330)

        it provides sufficent 'pluses' to make up for loss

        Show me how Steam makes up for my inability to sell, lend or give away old unloved games ? I'm pretty sure I won't be playing Half Life again anytime soon, but I know a certain kid who played the everloving crap out of it after I gave him the box and disc.

        The problem with the Steam model is they make too many assumptions:

        1. You're going to love the game, and love it until the world dies

        2. You're rich, and so is everyone you know, so nobody ever lends, trades or gives anything away second-hand.

        Wehell that's

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Protect their revenue? They've already been payed. There's nothing to protect. Here's my little nugget ... if the just lowered the prices of their games, they might actually make more money in volume. Sixty bucks is a lot of money. Even before I was married and had a lot of disposable income, I still balked at that price point. It's way beyond an impulse purchase. Buying a new game is like an investment requiring a lot of research. So these days I wait until the game price that I want drop like a ro
      • Protect their revenue? They've already been payed.

        Exactly, let's not couch this in their semantics. This is not "hurting their revenue" any more than the used car industry "hurts" the new car industry. What the used game industry does hurt is their ability to sell as many mediocre games as they want, at the price they want. And only slightly.

      • by billcopc (196330)

        This argument has been beaten to death, and still the publishers refuse to listen.

        When a game costs $60, and 8 times out of 10 it turns out to be absolute garbage, that is astoundingly poor value for money. So statistically, I have to blow $300 to find one game I actually like, and it might last me a few weeks, at best a month or two before I'm completely sick of it. If I could break that down into some sort of "fun-hours per dollar" metric, it would make cocaine and alcohol seem cheap by comparison.

    • by Renraku (518261)

      Steam actually violates the first sale doctrine. If it were challenged in court, it'd probably fail.

      We'd end up seeing serial numbers that were un-registerable and re-usable.

    • by vadim_t (324782)

      And this is precisely why I rarely buy games these days.

      All this crap about "protecting revenue" when I actually paid for the game drives me nuts, and is precisely the main thing that keeps me from buying them.

      I grew up, got a job and earned enough money to buy games when I want. Piracy isn't worth it at this point, it's easier to pay for stuff.

      Computers advanced far enough that most games will run on most systems that aren't the latest and greatest, RAM is cheap, and so is disk space, so system requirement

  • by hansamurai (907719) <hansamurai@gmail.com> on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:34PM (#27081989) Homepage Journal

    On Amazon right now, there are 22 used copies of Left 4 Dead (Xbox 360) with the cheapest being $38.00. Why on earth would someone do this trade in when you could make at least ten more dollars just listing it on their own marketplace?

    • Laziness
    • by Deag (250823)

      Is it ever worth it. I mean the only games that get a decent price are new ones which I would still be using.

      Seems to be a lot of bother for $10.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by AKAImBatman (238306) *

      Because listing items is a serious PITA that's not worth the trouble? Between the options of:

      A) Get money now for the thing you want to get rid of
      B) Setup a web front, attract a buyer, work out delivery and payment details, package item properly, go to [UPS|FedEx|USPS] to send package, and then beg the buyer for feedback ...I know which one most people would choose. B only makes sense if you plan to do a significant volume.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Javi0084 (926402)
        Not to mention the commission you need to pay Amazon.
    • by Chyeld (713439)

      And how fast do you think those copies are moving?

      • by D Ninja (825055)

        And how fast do you think those copies are moving?

        Left 4 Dead? Probably moving faster than a Boomer and slower than that witch that you just spooked...

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Radish03 (248960)
      In addition to the hassle of listing items and hoping for buyers that other posters mention, there is also the fact that Amazon takes a 15% commission, $0.99 per transaction fee, and $1.35 closing fee (source [amazon.com]). That $38 sale price translates into $29.96 for the seller (plus a small amount to cover shipping). $3.46 for a sure thing sale doesn't sound quite so bad.
    • by Jim Hall (2985)

      Why on earth would someone do this trade in when you could make at least ten more dollars just listing it on their own marketplace?

      I'm a gamer, but I also have a life. Kind of bits to have to post something on eBay or some other marketplace just to get rid of a game. Remember, you also have to ship the game, deal with money transfer, etc. May not be much to you, but I probably work more than 40hrs a week, and my free time is important to me. It's very convenient for me to just bring in any games I've stopped playing, and use them for trade when I buy a new game. For example, I recently went through my PSP/PS2/PS3 games, decided I wasn'

  • D'oh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by vjmurphy (190266) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:34PM (#27081991) Homepage

    "does Amazon joining the practice legitimize it?"

    No, it was legitimate before Amazon joined in. I think you might mean "popularize" it, or something different.

    • does Amazon joining the practice legitimize it?

      What were they thinking!! The next thing they'll do is try to sell used books or something.

      It's a slippery slope I tell you. The next thing we'll have is stores trying to sell used books, used music CDs/tapes, used movies, etc. It's like the World is going to Hell in a hand basket! Don't they realize that this is going to mean the end of book authors, the end of musicians, and the end of film-makers!!!

      It will be soooo bad, the only authors making money will h

  • by Taibhsear (1286214) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:35PM (#27081995)

    Is anyone going to accept those for trade in? Because I have quite a few games I never play anymore and/or got burned on (doesn't work, faulty discs that the company wouldn't replace, game sucks balls, etc.) that I'd love to swap for something decent. But since they are "easier to copy than console games" *cough*bullshit*cough* I never seem to be able to do so.

    • by antdude (79039)

      Same here. EB (before GameStop took over) used to buy used games. :( I don't do eBay, Craig's List, and stuff.

      • by dougmc (70836)

        I don't do eBay, Craig's List, and stuff.

        Well, perhaps you should -- PC games are bought and sold there all the time.

        An in general, CL and Ebay prices are significantly higher than what Gamestop pays for used games, and significantly lower than what they charge for used games. Cut out the middle man and you get more money for your games and get new ones for less.

  • If I can sell a used game to help of set the cost of a new one, then I might buy the new one where as before I would limit my buying much more.
  • No one should be telling anyone else what they can and can't do with their own property.

    If I want to sell a game I bought, I will. Just because the market for it may cut the industries profits makes no legitimate reason.

    Used cars are sold all the time. It has no bearing on new car sales. If those people could afford a new car, they would buy one.

    Same goes for games. Albeit, you're not getting a completely new car every time it changes hands.

    • Used cars are sold all the time. It has no bearing on new car sales. If those people could afford a new car, they would buy one.

      I guess you think that those auto-plant workers should just starve to death, huh? If you buy a used car, you're taking bread out of the mouths of the children of every assembly-line worker in Detroit.

      Remember: RESALE = THEFT.

      • by n6kuy (172098)

        I'm in the habit of starving the children of glass installers by not throwing a brick through my living room window every couple of weeks.

    • I agree with you in spirit, but:

      Used cars are sold all the time. It has no bearing on new car sales. If those people could afford a new car, they would buy one.

      I can afford new cars... but I always buy used. This is because the transportation value of the car (in terms of miles left before dead) decreases much more slowly than the dollar value (due to insanely high 1st-yr depreciation). At any rate, I buy used cars because I'm a cheapskate, not because I can't afford new ones.

      Availability of used cars *d

    • by dougmc (70836)

      Used cars are sold all the time. It has no bearing on new car sales. If those people could afford a new car, they would buy one.

      I don't know what you're smoking, but used cars sales have a huge bearing on new car sales. It's even been in the news lately [cnn.com].

      I can afford a new car, but I usually buy used cars because it saves me lots of money I can spend on other things.

      And I feel that this is right, moral, and the way things should be. If Detroit wants to sell me a car instead, they should make cars that I'd want to buy, at prices I'd want to pay for them. If they can't make cars that people will buy, then they need to go ou

  • Right Pricing (Score:2, Insightful)

    by meerling (1487879)
    There is a much larger market for a $20-$30 game than a $50-$60 one. Even Steam has come out and said this. So let's see, if packaging, shipping and promotion work out to about $5 per unit, and you sell 100,000 at $60 each for a total profit of $5.5 million. But if you only sold them for $25 each, and the lower price increased units sold to 300,000, (reasonable expectation based on personal expectations and the info from Steam) then your total profit would be $6 million. Maybe it's just me, but it seems
    • "Right now, the software industry is failing in that aspect completely."

      Well yeah, if we accept your back-of-the-napkin figures. But if the demand is less than 2x greater at $25, then they are right to leave it at $50. (Accepting, of course, your two-price idealization). All we're seeing is a disagreement between Valve and the rest of the PC games world over the true price elasticity of games.

      The games industry is stupid in a lot of ways, but I think we have to trust that they do know how to manipulate us s

  • Goozex is better (Score:5, Informative)

    by LoverOfJoy (820058) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @04:49PM (#27082183) Homepage
    I've found that for online game trading Goozex [goozex.com] beats everything else by a mile. Buyers and sellers get the same price with only a $1 transaction fee to Goozex (plus you pay shipping if you're the seller--but free shippinig for buyers). Goozex then acts as an arbiter to resolve disputes (though I've yet to ever have one and from what I can tell by the forums, it seems pretty rare for everyone else too). If you try out a game and decide it's not your style (or if you simply beat it) you can get full money back minus the $1 fee and shipping as long as you didn't hold onto it so long that the value of the game has gone down.

    To top it off, when you first start they give you a free $5 game (or $5 toward a more expensive game). Every other online site I've tried practically gives you peanuts for a game that they resell for much more.
    • by DCstewieG (824956)

      I use gametz.com [gametz.com]. No transaction fee, just shipping. Two successful trades for me so far, great experience. As a noob, I send first, then they send. If both traders have good rep, they send at the same time. Beats the hell out of giving GameStop undeserved (IMO) money.

      • That site looks good but one reservation I have is how long it takes to find people to swap with. As they don't use points (they advertise this as a plus) the person you "sell" to has to have something you want to "buy".

        I imagine if you only buy and sell the newest games within a single genre it probably isn't hard to find a match. However, I have quite a few older games and I have eclectic tastes in games (how often are the people who want to buy my old FPS Dreamcast game also the same people wanting to
  • Although Amazon may pay $2.00 more per game, is that going to make up for the shipping costs to send them the disc and get the new one? I'd love to see some pressure on GameStop to pay more for used games, but I don't think $2.00 is going to be enough.
    • by Albanach (527650)

      Although Amazon may pay $2.00 more per game, is that going to make up for the shipping costs to send them the disc and get the new one?

      Clicking the link in the summary tells me Amazon pay for shipping, and since most games cost more than $25 games you buy will be eligible for free super saver shipping (or if you're a Prime member, free 2 day shipping).

  • I bet that the next generation of consoles will have something to limit used game sales, and will push digital downloads much more than a physical media that can be easily traded.

    What Amazon should do is publish the figures on how many of the used game sales were put right back in to new game sales and maybe it will convince the publishers that second hand sales is not necessarily as bad as they thought.
    • I bet that the next generation of consoles will have something to limit used game sales, and will push digital downloads much more than a physical media that can be easily traded.

      That is definitely a safe bet. I would also guess that older gamers are going to be more dissatisfied with that, are going to buy less games because we can't buy used, but kids are going to continue buying just as much, leading to a focus on kids games and mediocre games we're already seeing on the wii.

  • The issue is not whether to legitimise it, the issue is whether the industry trying to kill the second hand market will succeed in getting enough corporate mindshare to have it thought of as a bad thing.

    Every major high street game pc/console game retailer I have seen has a secondhand section.
    Amazon sell used books too, another practice that printed word distributers tried to kill off (a bizarre strategy in itself).

    This limited activation DRM thing is part of the idea that secondhand game sales can be preve

  • As long as the games weren't copied before being resold, there is no issue here. Any game companies that object will look as stupid as the record companies that objected to stores buying and selling used CDs.
  • People trade their games to Gamestop because they don't want the hassle of selling them online. For instance, maybe they are just a kid, and their parents won't help, or maybe they just don't trust the internet.
    If you are going to go to the hassle of putting it online and then shipping it, why not just put it on ebay and make three times what Amazon would give you? I did a quick search of a few games, and Amazon's trade in value is still about a third of what you could get on ebay.
    I think Amazon is missing the point.
    • People trade their games to Gamestop because they don't want the hassle of selling them online. For instance, maybe they are just a kid, and their parents won't help

      I live in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The pawn shops, coin shops, and used DVD and video game shops around here use LeadsOnline [leadsonline.com], and they require a driver license or other state ID from someone age 18 or older. I wonder why it isn't the same where you live.

  • Steam (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Thaelon (250687) on Thursday March 05, 2009 @05:07PM (#27082473)

    I wish someone would bring some first sale doctrine to Steam.

    I cannot sell my "used" steam games to anyone for any price. This is not to say that steam doesn't have its benefits. But losing the ability to sell old games is a tough one to swallow.

    And they typically charge the same as if I'd gotten some tangible assets I could resell even though I can't.

    The ruckus being caused among developers and publishers exactly the same being caused among the RIAA/MPAA. The business model of making something intangible and selling copies of it printed on plastic discs for a premium is faltering towards obsolescence.

    Basically they had a money printing machine, and now they're whining that people have found ways to cut into their fat profit margins. Forgive me if I just consider that another aspect of the market instead of sympathizing.

  • It takes money from game publishers every time you sell a used game. And forces them to charge even more for their games to make up the loss. It's about time we turn this problem around with an economic stimulus package for the game industry. How many billions, with a b, do we need to give for Duke Nukem Forever to be released and help stimulate the economy?

    • It takes money from game publishers every time you sell a used game. And forces them to charge even more for their games to make up the loss. It's about time we turn this problem around with an economic stimulus package for the game industry.

      It's a real testament to the lack of imagination or intelligence in detroit that they didn't think to use this argument, blaming used car sales, when they were asking for a bailout.

    • by dougmc (70836)

      It takes money from game publishers every time you sell a used game.

      To be more precise, it takes money from them every time they lose a sale, and if somebody buys your used game rather than buying a new one, they've lost a sale.

      And what do I think about that? Boo hoo. They're selling a physical object that can be traded and sold. If they don't want this to happen, they should be selling something else -- a service of some sort perhaps? (And no, selling a game with a shrink wrapped license doesn't make it a service.)

      Every time you buy a used car, you're costing

    • It's about time we turn [the alleged used video game sales] problem around with an economic stimulus package for the game industry.

      I thought the anti-used-game stimulus package [wikipedia.org] came in the fourth quarter of 2004.

  • Game publishers put on the pimp hat: "That's my money you're taking, muthafucka! We betta get on this here elecamatronic distribution thing, beyotch!"

    This is not much of an exaggeration. The only real differences between pimps and game publishers are the choice of clothes and vernacular.

  • If they didn't sell the game then it is impossible for you to sell the game.

    Examples:
    If what you are doing is called "buying a license" then you are selling the license.

    If they say you are borrowing it for your use for a fee, then you are loaning it for someone else's use for a fee.

    No matter how they phrase it what they are doing is what you are doing. If the EULA specifies that by you doing what they did is illegal then they should be arrested/fined/sued for doing it first.

The universe does not have laws -- it has habits, and habits can be broken.

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