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D&D Co-Creator Dave Arneson Dies of Cancer 71

Posted by Soulskill
from the rest-in-peace dept.
epee1221 was one of many readers to send word that Dave Arneson, co-creator of Dungeons & Dragons, has died of cancer at the age of 61. "Arneson is often described as an 'unsung hero' in the history of gaming, having been largely eclipsed by his collaborator Gary Gygax. While Gygax was known for developing the rules for Dungeons & Dragons, Arneson's work focused more on the role-playing element. Although the two split up, Arneson continued developing fantasy role-playing content, and later taught game design at Full Sail University." We discussed Gary Gygax's passing just over a year ago.
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D&D Co-Creator Dave Arneson Dies of Cancer

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  • Re:Darn, (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 11, 2009 @02:41AM (#27540031)

    Not really, we just don't have a diamond that expensive... and haven't you heard that this place is a dead magic zone?

  • Re:Blackmoor (Score:3, Informative)

    by Sasayaki (1096761) on Saturday April 11, 2009 @10:48AM (#27541979)

    As someone who was an avid fan of v3.5 and loves 4th edition *even more*, lemme just say...

    3rd edition is very, very different from 4th. And very, very different from 2nd. Remember all those guys who, when 3rd edition was released spluttered and went; "WotC are trying to kill D&D! This isn't D&D at all; Gygax would have a fit if he saw this! 2nd Ed is all I'll play and that's final!"

    Don't you look back on those guys and go, "Wow. Their complaints have a little merit, but overall the system is a lot better now. This '3rd Ed' thing is new and different, for better or worse (but mostly better)... those guys are really missing out by avoiding it."

    Sorry you're this edition's fallbehinds. :) Pass the d20 mate, daddy needs a new pair of beholder-skin boots...

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