Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
PlayStation (Games) Portables (Games) Entertainment Games

Custom Firmware For the PSP-3000 Released 97

Posted by Soulskill
from the always-nice-to-have-options dept.
Busshy writes "Today, owners of PSP-3000 consoles, and those on PSP-2000s with boards that were previously incompatible, have now joined all those who have been enjoying PSP homebrew for years with the release of a new custom firmware that brings emulation and much more to those systems. You will need the recent Chickhen homebrew enabler installed for it to work."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Custom Firmware For the PSP-3000 Released

Comments Filter:
  • Uses (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Toonol (1057698) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @12:52AM (#28239163)
    Emulation is great, and I would crack my PSP just for that, if I had one.

    But it is just a bit disingenuous of the summary to not mention game piracy. It is one of the main reasons people install the new firmware; I suspect it's by far the primary driving force. It's also the main reason Sony is constantly plugging the holes and making revisions. It's not to combat emulation and homebrew.

    I have no problem with modifying things you own; but the actual reasons that most people are interested in it shouldn't be just ignored. That's not intellectually honest.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Why don't they allow homebrew then? They let people install Linux on their PS3. Why not let them do the same on their PSP? It's not only that they don't want people copying games.

      • Why don't they allow homebrew then? They let people install Linux on their PS3.

        Because Linux for PLAYSTATION 3 has no access to the NVIDIA RSX GPU apart from a dumb frame buffer, it is less powerful than a PC for 3D games. The big draws of a PS3 over a PC are 1. you get to use most of the Cell CPU's DSP cores (except for one that the hypervisor reserves), and 2. the PS3 can display on an older, pre-HD television without needing a $40 box to convert VGA to S-Video [sewelldirect.com]. So it's better than a PC for high-performance computing, but the PC is better for homebrew gaming.

        I'm guessing that Son

        • by Khyber (864651)

          "Because Linux for PLAYSTATION 3 has no access to the NVIDIA RSX GPU apart from a dumb frame buffer,"

          Not when me and a few friends get done with it. That hypervisor is not as secure as Sony likes to think it is. And the most recent update for the PS3, as far as we can tell, closed five holes we knew about but opened up about another dozen, maybe more, we're not done prodding everything yet.

        • by Spatial (1235392)

          2. the PS3 can display on an older, pre-HD television without needing a $40 box to convert VGA to S-Video.

          Most graphics cards already have an s-video output. All the ones I've had even came with a component adapter for convenience.

          • by Ant P. (974313)

            Not to mention VGA is electrically compatible with SCART.

            • by tepples (727027)

              Not to mention VGA is electrically compatible with SCART.

              Really? VGA is progressive, and I don't see anything in the Wikipedia article [wikipedia.org] about progressive signals over SCART's RGB pins. Besides, I live in the United States, where SCART is unknown.

          • Most graphics cards already have an s-video output.

            Most desktop PCs that I've seen lately don't have a graphics card. Instead, they have an Intel GMA on the motherboard with only a VGA output.

            • by Sj0 (472011)

              In that case, isn't the whole argument a bit disingenuous, comparing a $300 PC to a $500 console?

              • by tepples (727027)

                In that case, isn't the whole argument a bit disingenuous, comparing a $300 PC to a $500 console?

                I've seen $400 PCs (compare to the $400 PS3) with only VGA (or DVI-I) out. Sure, a $40 adapter fixes this, but the median gamer doesn't even know they exist: PCs are for small, high-resolution monitors and consoles are for large, low-resolution monitors in the median gamer's mind.

                • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                  by Sj0 (472011)

                  That brings another thing to mind: The PS3 and Xbox 360 are strongly designed with HD in mind. Some games are unplayable on a standard television because the text is so high resolution.

                  If you own a decent HDTV, it will have a VGA or DVI input.

                  • Very true. Heck, back even in the PSone days there were a few games that I had trouble reading the text of in composite (Darkstone is one example), you really needed S-Video for those. There were some PS2 games like that as well, I remember Hot Shots Golf 3 being that way.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by somersault (912633)

      Games for the PSP are very cheap. I was considering cracking mine before just to get simple stuff like a better media player front end and an alarm clock. Emulators would be cool too but I didn't get the device just for gaming.

    • by TBoon (1381891)
      Until Sony permitted playback of hires h264 video in official firmware, that was one of my main reasons for running custom firmware. Also, running games from memorystick rather than UMD seems to save a lot of battery. Nowadays I mostly use mine for watching movies while flying, or waiting in airports.
    • Hey now (Score:3, Interesting)

      by HalAtWork (926717)
      It's a bit disingenuous to say that people only/mostly install CFW to play pirated games. The PSP didn't start out having very good games, and people still say its library is pretty slim. Most people I know who own a PSP only use it to play homebrew, and not PSP games at all. I don't think the PSP would have risen to such popularity if it wasn't for the homebrew scene.

      As an actual games machine, it's cumbersome. The load times are long, UMDs suck up your battery, the games are too involving, and the am
      • by ji777 (1107063)
        I agree with most of what you are saying here. I have a "modded" PSP which I have used almost exclusively to replay ebooted rips of my old PS1 library in a hand-held, portable way. Currently playing Breath Of Fire 4 and I just slapped my Deception 3 onto it last night. It's breathed new life into my CDs which had been gathering dust. I know they are now selling some classic PS1 games in Sony's online store, but they are really few and... well... I already bought them for ~40-50 bucks back in the day. I
    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      Emulation is great, and I would crack my PSP just for that, if I had one.

      But it is just a bit disingenuous of the summary to not mention game piracy. It is one of the main reasons people install the new firmware; I suspect it's by far the primary driving force. It's also the main reason Sony is constantly plugging the holes and making revisions. It's not to combat emulation and homebrew.

      I have no problem with modifying things you own; but the actual reasons that most people are interested in it shouldn't be

  • by Daemonax (1204296) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @01:17AM (#28239257)
    What really sucks with regards to this whole area of tinkering is the DMCA and other laws that make it illegal to tinker with your own property. Companies can do all the want to try to hinder it if they want to waste time and money on that, it certainly provides a nice challenge for the people that like trying to crack these things. But when the law just makes it illegal, that's bullshit. It ends up making the most curious and intelligent of us, into criminals.
  • Piracy, Shmiracy (Score:3, Informative)

    by Sick Boy (5293) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @01:28AM (#28239289) Homepage

    Yes, you can use this to pirate. Whoopdodoo. There are lots of other benefits you're overlooking.

    - Running games off the memstick is much faster than waiting for the UMD to load
    - You can fit several games on the memstick (some may be pirated, if you're a dishonest prick who wants the platform to fail). That means you don't need to lug a ton of fragile disks around when you travel.
    - Not using the UMD means extended battery life.

    This is really spiffy, don't get me wrong. But what I'd really like is an update to 5.50 firmware so the copy of Final Fantasy VII I just BOUGHT will play on my hacked PSP. I think all the PS1 re-releases from E3 require updated firmware, and that blows.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If you paid for it and it doesn't work, then downloading [thepiratebay.org] a copy that does is 100 per cent reasonable.

      • He bought it knowing he didn't have the hardware to run it. What about that gives him the right to start distributing copies to others?
        • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          distributing copies to others?

          Who said anything about that? Just throttle your upload speeds and there you go. As though the people downloading a torrent aren't going to get their copy of Final Fantasy 7 anyway.

    • Re:Piracy, Shmiracy (Score:5, Informative)

      by skreeech (221390) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @01:48AM (#28239347)

      you can run FFVII on CFW
      you need to use the recovery menu to select "use version.txt" then usb toggle flash0 find version.txt and change all 5.00 or 500 to 5.50/550

      I have not gotten FFVII but it worked for Fire pro wrestling G off the japanese store.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by crossmr (957846)

      some may be pirated, if you're a dishonest prick who wants the platform to fail

      The PSP has been a known pirate haven for years and has been running on almost nothing but. Most early news reports suggested piracy was what kept the console alive.

    • by Spatial (1235392)
      Another benefit: Sony limited the speed of the CPU/GPU below its rated speed in most games, perhaps to preserve battery life.

      You can increase them to the max speed with custom firmware. It makes a huge difference to the framerate in some games at the cost of a little battery life.
  • Pandora (Score:4, Interesting)

    by EEPROMS (889169) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @01:51AM (#28239363)

    You can go save your self some time and buy a Pandora with hardware specs 2-3 times better and totally open for hacking.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by EEPROMS (889169)
      sorry link didnt work, the Pandora wiki can be found here [wikipedia.org]
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      For twice the price, and without the PSP's great library of commercial games. Not to mention that waiting months for a piece of hardware to be released is hardly what I'd consider saving time.

      • and without the PSP's great library of commercial games.

        A lot of PSP games are either sequels to games on the original PlayStation (PS1) or even emulated versions of games for the PS1 or older systems, especially on PSN. The prototypes of the Pandora gaming PDA can emulate the PS1: rip your discs and put the ISO on the SD card.

        • by MAD R (1570369)
          but then thy miffeth out upon thingf fuch af thy neweft, juft af difficult to underftand fake-fpearean tranflation of Final Fantafy Tacticf like chattel!!

          ...wow that's hard to read
  • by rsmith-mac (639075) on Sunday June 07, 2009 @01:55AM (#28239377)

    Custom Firmware is a bit of a misnomer. For the PSP-3000 (and last sub-model of the 2000, T88v3) it's not possible to replace the built-in firmware with a truly custom firmware, as Sony does signature checking that would keep the PSP from loading unsigned firmware. This is different from the early PSPs, where it was possible to fake out the device and make it accept any firmware.

    Anyhow, this isn't a custom firmware in the traditional sense, rather it's more of a injection attack of the PSP's operating system. Normally unsigned code is blocked by the OS, but there's a vulnerability in the TIFF decoder that allows for executing such code. Using the ChickHEN tool (a compromised TIFF file and a payload) the OS's signature checks can be compromised by injecting replacement files in to the running OS, which the PSP happily complies with. With the check disabled, the PSP will run unsigned code for homebrew, but it lacks the drivers necessary to run backup/pirated games. This is an important distinction, because the ChickHEN tool has been around for a few weeks now and is not what TFA is talking about.

    This latest hack (5.03 GEN-A) finally takes it one step further and uses the ability to run unsigned code to inject the additional drivers needed to make the PSP treat ISOs on a Memory Stick as a UMD game. This hack isn't necessary to run homebrew, it's solely for running commercial games. Notably it's still entirely a runtime attack, and if the PSP cold boots it will return to normal operation.

    This is to Sony's advantage (what little good news there is, at least), because the hardware has not been compromised in any way. As PSPs can not be flashed with earlier firmware versions, all PSPs running firmware versions later than 5.03 can not be attacked as the TIFF vulnerability was fixed. This limits the number of vulnerable units to old units that haven't been upgraded, as new units will come with the fixed firmware. Of course this doesn't preclude another software vulnerability being found in the OS or a hardware attack, but usable software vulnerabilities are very rare, and a hardware attack would be the equivalent of the Holy Grail at this point.

    Anyhow, since it's not a real custom firmware, it's not necessarily a viable long-term hack. Users will never be able to upgrade their firmware, so any software that requires a later firmware version (and can't be trivially bypassed by lying to it) would be unusable in hacked PSPs. Sony no doubt will be working to isolate hacked PSPs in this manner.

  • Get the PSP 300 now! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ZirconCode (1477363)

    Or you could simply buy a PSP 1000 (phat) for half the price and get a proper CFW on it, not just an eggsploit which disappears whenever you perform a hard-reset.

    I think buying a new PSP is a waste of money, especially when Sony was so nice as to make everything 100% backwards compatible. The only advantages of the PSP 3000 towards the 1000 is it weighs less, comes in all kinds of ugly colors, and has a terribly cheap microphone embeded in it.

    • by Spatial (1235392)
      The 3000 also has interlacing problems on the screen which the other models lack. It's fugly.
      • by Ifandbut (1328775)

        However the other PSPs have ghosting problems and a lower color range which the PSP-3000 lacks.

      • The interlacing isn't that noticeable, the ghosting on the PSP 1000 is worse. The enhanced color range on the 3000 also helps some of the older games that were dim and dark on the 1000 because the dev's created and tested them on monitors and not actual releasae PSP hardware.

Disclaimer: "These opinions are my own, though for a small fee they be yours too." -- Dave Haynie

Working...