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Handhelds PlayStation (Games) Sony Games

Why the Sony PSP Had To "Go" 261

Posted by Soulskill
from the it-was-getting-late-and-the-dog-had-been-inside-all-day dept.
We recently discussed the release of the PSP Go, which drew criticism for many design choices that were of dubious value to consumers. Now, Phaethon360 sends in a story about why Sony felt the need to improve upon the old PSP. "As a format, the UMD was holding the entire platform back. Few people (if anyone) bought into the UMD movie hype Sony attempted to thrust back in 2005. Very soon after that, people realized they could rip their DVDs to a memory stick with the same quality. It's ironic how, as the price of Sony Memory Stick Pro Duo dropped and size increased, PSP UMD sales decreased along with it. It doesn't take too many Howard Stringers to figure out what the problem was." Indeed, Sony was complaining of rampant PSP piracy for quite some time. They cited "legal and technical issues" for not supporting the transfer of UMD games onto the PSP Go; undoubtedly they couldn't find a way to keep pirated games from being copied.
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Why the Sony PSP Had To "Go"

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  • by Sockatume (732728) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @05:50AM (#29654977)

    They cited "legal and technical issues" for not supporting the transfer of UMD games onto the PSP Go; undoubtedly they couldn't find a way to keep pirated games from being copied.

    I'm not sure how UMD-to-flash transfer helps people copy pirated games. I mean, the pirated games are disk images on flash memory. An actual physical UMD isn't involved.

    • by Jurily (900488)

      I'm not sure how UMD-to-flash transfer helps people copy pirated games. I mean, the pirated games are disk images on flash memory. An actual physical UMD isn't involved.

      Either nobody at Sony realized piracy involves desktop computers and the internet, or they're just using this as an excuse to increase their profit margins. Care to take a guess?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Sony? Probably both.
      • I don't know what they think, but I am not buying a Go until hell freezes. I will stick to UMDs until they run out. By then, if I have to buy another portable, it will be something else for sure. A nintendo DSI maybe.

        I read ars review [arstechnica.com] on the psp go and it is simply unbelievable what they have done. They just want to fuck the customer and profit. I didn't pirated any PSP game and will not pay for other people mistakes

        • Huh.

          Reading that review makes me want to dust-off my old Atari, Nintendo, and Sega Genesis consoles, and relive the days when gaming was FUN rather than a chore. The PSP Go sounds like a royal piece of shit, especially the part where you have to waste 2-3 hours downloading games.

          • by Tetsujin (103070)

            Huh.

            Reading that review makes me want to dust-off my old Atari, Nintendo, and Sega Genesis consoles, and relive the days when gaming was FUN rather than a chore. The PSP Go sounds like a royal piece of shit, especially the part where you have to waste 2-3 hours downloading games.

            Yeah, 802.11b is inexcusable for a device like this in the present day...

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:03AM (#29655049) Journal
      Presumably, unless each UMD has a unique serial number, and the hypothetical UMD-to-PSP Go converter phones it home, there would be no way for Sony to keep a given UMD disk from being turned into N copies, all blessed by Sony.

      And, even if there are unique serial numbers, and they could make that work, any official mechanism that produces blessed copies of legacy applications would presumably be a logical target for attackers.

      And/or because Sony's secret bylaws compel them to treat their customers with precisely equal amounts of hatred and contempt at all times.
      • by ThePhilips (752041) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:16AM (#29655107) Homepage Journal

        Presumably, unless each UMD has a unique serial number, and the hypothetical UMD-to-PSP Go converter phones it home, there would be no way for Sony to keep a given UMD disk from being turned into N copies, all blessed by Sony.

        What about accepting reality that pirates already enjoy the premium service - and providing legit customers with the something similar??

        Or Sony felt compelled to feed the pirates with new and more justifications to do what they did before?

        And/or because Sony's secret bylaws compel them to treat their customers with precisely equal amounts of hatred and contempt at all times.

        That's more like it.

        Sony and Nintendo are quite similar that they pretty much always dismiss their own customers. That's why people are so divided: they either love it or hate it. It feels like their R&Ds live and work in some sort of isolated underground lab where novelties like internet and forums are not available. And all of customer feedback is substituted with directives and memos from upper management. Well, at least Nintendo has the luminary Miyamoto (who is already "upper management") and his games have some loyal fans.

      • by Sockatume (732728)

        That's a way of pirating games, not copying or loading pirated games.

  • by Viol8 (599362) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @05:51AM (#29654979)

    With hard copy disc based games you can sell them on to friends or a shop once you're done. A bit more difficult with a download - people will just want it for free and what shop will buy a memory stick off you that may or may not work and may or may not have viruses etc embedded on it?

    • by don_carnage (145494) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:59AM (#29655321) Homepage

      I think you really hit the nail on the head here. There is a pretty big market for reselling used games. With the PSP Go, not only are you restricted from reselling your used games but you are also locked into purchasing them from Sony's download service.

      Ars Technica [arstechnica.com] published an excellent review on the PSP Go and why you should just stick with the standard PSP 3000.

      • by Jaysyn (203771)

        Great point, I've got about 20 UMD games for my PSP. I bought exactly 3 of them new.

      • by commodore64_love (1445365) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @09:38AM (#29656917) Journal

        P.S.

        The PSP Go reminds me of another frak-up by an earlier company called Commodore. They had the extremely-popular Amiga 500, then released a 600 that was supposed to be an upgrade, but was actually less functional (no keypad, not backwards-compatible with old games, and not expandable). According to their chief engineer Dave Haynie, the A600 "was supposed to be $50-$60 cheaper than the A500, but it came in at about that much more expensive than the A500." The Managing Director of Commodore UK, David Pleasance, described the A600 as a "complete and utter screw-up."

        I suspect ten years from now we'll see Sony engineers saying the PSP GO started as a good idea, but due to poor management and bad decisions, became a complete and utter screw-up, and about $100 more expensive than it was meant to be.

    • by toppavak (943659)
      Agreed. I think a lot of people are missing that being able to cut out the multi-billion-dollar used game market is a lot more important to Sony than reducing piracy of music- and a lot more ominous for the user. Its the ultimate lock-in, like if Apple were to decide one day to force iTunes users to only be able to listen/sync to music purchased from iTMS. Sony here is giving a giant middle finger to the first-sale doctrine.
      • >>>Sony here is giving a giant middle finger to the first-sale doctrine.

        And we the customers are giving a giant middle finger back, as we close our wallets and refuse to buy any more games. I'm not going to buy anything that I can't later say, "Well I'm tired of that game," and sell it to someone else. I'll just keep playing my older Atari, Sega, Nintendo, and Playstation consoles. Frak Sony, frak RIAA, and frak e-books sellers.

        I reserve the right to have a physical object so I can sell it late

  • Excellent, now all the pirates will drop their old pirate friendly PSP and buy a GO. /sarcasm
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Jaysyn (203771)

      I've a cracked PSP & can honestly say I've never pirated a single PSP UMD game. I do however have emulators & ROMs on it for every NES, SNES, Gameboy, SMS & Genesis game I've ever owned. As well as all of my PS1 games which run natively after a little tweaking. I also have PSP versions of Tyrian, Quake & a E-Book reader on there.

  • by AlXtreme (223728) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:00AM (#29655027) Homepage Journal

    It's ironic how, as the price of Sony Memory Stick Pro Duo dropped and size increased, PSP UMD sales decreased along with it.

    No, it's not.

    • by Nik13 (837926) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:27AM (#29655169) Homepage

      Sony memory card pricing hurts them in many ways. It's one of the many reasons I won't buy a Sony camera (no, it's not that I can't pirate pictures or whatever). My favorite shop's prices:

      2GB SD card: $8 but I've seen them as low as $6 before.
      4GB SD card: $13
      8GB SD card: $19
      16GB SD card: $33
      32GB SD card: $85

      2GB MS Duo card: $27
      4GB MS Duo card: $35
      8GB MS Duo card: $60
      16GB MS Duo card: $150
      32GB MS Duo card: $250

      • You are paying too much for your SD cards...

      • by Jaysyn (203771)

        You're getting screwed by your favorite shop. I bought my 8 GiB Memory Stick at Wal-Mart for $32. Here is a hint, look in the camera department & not the games department. Still quite a bit more then an equivalent SD card though.

      • by Mr_Silver (213637)

        Sony memory card pricing hurts them in many ways. It's one of the many reasons I won't buy a Sony camera (no, it's not that I can't pirate pictures or whatever).

        Indeed, I avoid Sony cameras like the plague for this very reason.

        However when I got a PSP, I picked myself a MicroSDHC to Memory Stick Pro Duo converter (something like this [amazon.com] although lots of other places do them).

        The converter plus an 8GB card already starts to save you money and you don't get stuck with memory in the future that you cannot use els

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mcgrew (92797) *

        It's one of the many reasons I won't buy a Sony camera

        There is only one reason I won't buy a Sony camera -- I was an XCP victim. You would have to be a complete and utter moron to buy anything digital from a company with a history of rooting their own customers' computers.

        I can't figure out how Sony is still in business, are there that many stupid people in the world who will buy froma company that has shown nothing but contempt for their customers? No wonder the economy collapsed. If a company like Sony ca

      • Sony memory card pricing hurts them in many ways. It's one of the many reasons I won't buy a Sony camera (no, it's not that I can't pirate pictures or whatever). My favorite shop's prices: 2GB SD card: $8 but I've seen them as low as $6 before.
        4GB SD card: $13
        8GB SD card: $19
        16GB SD card: $33
        32GB SD card: $85

        2GB MS Duo card: $27
        4GB MS Duo card: $35
        8GB MS Duo card: $60
        16GB MS Duo card: $150
        32GB MS Duo card: $250

        It's obviously that MS tax everyone on Slashdot talks about. Even other companies are af

    • by ari_j (90255)
      It is, in fact, the exact opposite of ironic. Even Alanis and the Robot Devil have a better sense of irony than that.
      • by PinkyDead (862370)

        In fact, it could be ironic - it all depends on the unmentioned intention.

        Although, it would be a strange business strategy for Sony to drop the price of the Duo stick and increase their size in order to increase sales of UMD movies.

        Like I always say, you just can't be up to them Japanese.

    • I wish people didn't use the word ironic when they truly mean something akin to poetic justice. Irony is when a phrase has an opposite meaning than it's literal meaning or intended meaning. [reference.com]

      What the author here is trying to convey is that it is cynically [reference.com] funny (funny to those who believe in human selfishness) that the two are correlated. Of course that does not equal causation [wikipedia.org], but now I'm just getting off topic (PS: I love the lemon graph [wikipedia.org] at the top, I toss it in slide shows randomly to see if anyone is
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by PiSkyHi (1049584)

        You are supposed to read into it. The intention was to point out that Sony's attempt to increase sales by reducing the price of 1 item, correlated with reduced sales of another item. By referring to it as irony, there is an implied causation as well as correlation.

        The irony being Sonys efforts had an opposite in meaning effect for them.

        That holds up with your definition as well - just have to read backwards from the irony, rather than imply a mistake was made when it isn't spelled out for you.

  • Movie failure. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hozza (1073224) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:02AM (#29655037)

    Sony can only blame itself for the failure of UMD movies. When the PSP first came out I was looking forward to having portable movies, but they cost significantly more than DVD's even though they were lower quality and could only be viewed on one device (the PSP 1000 had no video out), it was no wonder they didn't sell.

    • I have never bought a UMD movie, nor am I interested in watching a movie on a small screen. One of the kids bought one at a pawnshop once, and his comment on the viewing experience was "lame."

      My entire concern here is that my family has a large number of games on the format (we have five people, and five PSPs -- many games we have 2 or more copies of so we can play machine to machine -- Tekken, race games, etc.), and the new machine won't play them. At all. As in we supported Sony and the game manufactur

      • by Nursie (632944)

        You sound... uh... odd.

        You really bought a backup PS3 just so you could keep playing PS2 games?

        How often do you even care about playing a PS2 game?
        I know since I got current-gen systems I've barely ever looked back. I think I played StarWars Battlefront once. Besides which, emulation is coming along well in the form of PCSX2. I find it almost unbelievable you would bother to spend all that money on a redundant PS3, or a whole new set of PSPs.

        Hell, by the time your current lot start to break noticeably (and

        • You sound... uh... odd.

          You really bought a backup PS3 just so you could keep playing PS2 games?

          How often do you even care about playing a PS2 game?
          I know since I got current-gen systems I've barely ever looked back. I think I played StarWars Battlefront once. Besides which, emulation is coming along well in the form of PCSX2. I find it almost unbelievable you would bother to spend all that money on a redundant PS3, or a whole new set of PSPs.

          Hell, by the time your current lot start to break noticeably (and

      • by calagan800xl (1001055) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @07:14AM (#29655407)
        Many people (including you apparently) don't get the fact that the PSPGo is not meant to be a replacement for the PSP-3000. The UMD-friendly PSP will still be available after the PSPGo's launch, so the comparison with the PS3 is not really relevant
        • by Ceiynt (993620) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @09:54AM (#29657179)
          Nintendo said, repeatably, the DS was not a replacement for the GBA, they will exist concurrently and continue to have game developed on them. One year later, the GBA was dead. I can see Sony completely killing the "old" PSP model in favor of the 100% Sony controlled PSP Go, even if it is an utter failure. They will take my PSP-2001 from my old dead hands.
      • I have probably every interesting movie that came out on UMD that was interesting - most purchased at $5 or less (yay firesales!).

        I also own 3 PSPs (I use a 1k, my kid and my wife a 2k)

        The problem I have with the go is still much the same as your problem - with over 40 games and 30 some movies on UMD, I have no interest in a new device that makes me as a customer re-re-buy all of that.
        Screw that - I'll be buying another used PSP at some point to keep as backup :)

    • Sony has a long track record of shooting themselves in the foot. In the days of mini-disc, it required you to encode the music in the Sony proprietary format onto minidisc. As a result, recording stuff to minidisc took a long time, a 5 minute song took 5 minutes to record. Sony digital cameras force you to use Memory Stick, which is much more expensive than standard SD cards. Oh, and a Sony DVD player will not let you play DVDs from other regions.

      Sony cares more about screwing their customers into proprieta

      • by Nursie (632944) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @07:21AM (#29655447)

        Yes, doomed I tell you!

        Ignore the millions of units of PSPs, PS3s, cameras, tvs and everything else, they're doomed!

        I love this site for this stuff. It's almost as if geeks believe in the legendary "informed consumer" who will act (en-masse in fact) to deny profit to companies that abuse him or her for their own ends. Unfortunately, we don't live in that world. Sony will continue to do just fine, and the people with technical/ethical problems with what they are doing will be swept under in a wave of apathy and "Oooh, shiny".

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Swanktastic (109747)

          The truth is probably somewhere in between. Unless Sony gets its act together, it is destined to exit the hardware business and become a pure media conglomerate. It won't happen tomorrow, but it will happen.

          It took the Japanese 30 years to dominate the US Auto industry despite the fact that year in / year out they were delivering significantly better value to the consumer. It happened, but not overnight because big brands have a tremendous amount of momentum. It takes the combination of HUGE management

  • by pla (258480) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:04AM (#29655051) Journal
    Indeed, Sony was complaining of rampant PSP piracy for quite some time.

    With games, they arguably have a fair point.

    With movies ripped from DVD... WTF, Sony? Did you really think that people would buy the same movie on both DVD and UMD? Seriously? Fire the moron who thought that would fly.


    People bought CDs of music they already had on vinyl or cassette or what-have-you because they had noticeably better quality (don't give me that vinyl-beats-CD crap, which even if it did hold true on a virgin record, doesn't once a diamond needle has ripped down all those those nice soft grooves). Once you talk about the same quality in 20 different physical formats, however, don't expect people to subsidize you for the rest of eternity rebuying your existing library in incrementally better formats.
    • With movies ripped from DVD... WTF, Sony? Did you really think that people would buy the same movie on both DVD and UMD? Seriously? Fire the moron who thought that would fly.

      Yeah, that's exactly what Sony, Universal, EMI, Warner, Columbia, Paramount, Walt Disney, NewsCorp, Viacom, Microsoft, Nintendo, and every other single digital media distributor / producer believes.

    • by mcgrew (92797) * on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @08:47AM (#29656251) Homepage Journal

      Not to start this same argument all over again, but the diamond needle only rips down all those those nice soft grooves if you have a cheap turntable with a 25 gram weight on that stylus. Earlier turntables and records were even worse; the old shellack platters wore out quickly. But I have decades-old LPs you would think were virgin, played on a 1/2 gram pressure.

      If the title originally came out in analog, the LP will sound better than the CD (again, given a good enough turntable. One of digital's advantages is except for speakers, more money doesn't buy better sound). If it was originally mastered digitally, the CD will sound better than the LP.

      Any time you mix analog with digital you get the worst of both worlds, with the advantages of neither. Many titles that originally were LP will have the CD sound better than the LP, because the LP was digitally mastered. Don't bother buying the LP version of any new music, because the new music will have been mastered digitally.

  • UMD and Minidisc (Score:3, Insightful)

    by rarel (697734) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:22AM (#29655141) Homepage
    Their major blunder with the PSP/UMD was to redesign an existing concepot (the Minidisc) as the UMD to differentiate between the new shiny better one and the old.

    Thing is, the Minidisc had a minor but loyal following, and in 2004 got a major upgrade with the Hi-MD format that allowed data and video to be trasnferred on top of music. And the major advantage of the format compared to the newfangled UMD was that it was rewritable.

    If they had released the PSP with Minidisc games, videos and whatnot, I'm sure the console's story would have been completely different. Even with the Memory stick slot on the side. Both rewritable formats, and they'd have been SONY so presumably they wouldn't have lost anything. Of course that would have meant trusting the customers with an relatively open media, and that's something they're allergic to.

    Instead they created the UMDs, closed and crippled them, and tried to sell them at the same price as full blown DVDs. No wonder it didn't take off. Meh.

    • by wrook (134116) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:38AM (#29655227) Homepage

      Minidiscs are still extremely popular here in Japan. I don't really understand why, but virtually everybody I know has a minidisc system. I sometimes think Sony lives in a Japan-centric bubble. They make decisions based on what they can get away with in Japan (quite a lot) and figure it will work for the rest of the world. It really doesn't. Slowly, though, I see things changing. The high school students I teach here are moving away from Sony as far as I can tell. I wouldn't be surprised if in 10 years Sony collapses based on their inability to see reality.

      • I found my old Minidisc recorder about two months ago. I'd had it since college, making it a decade old. The disc inside played flawlessly, the sound quality was as good as any mid-spec MP3 player (RAW audio, don't forget), and found a couple of albums for which the CDs were damaged.

        My only issue with it is it now is extremely slow to copy music to compared to flash storage; It's audiostream recording.
      • I suspect the same dynamic. Sony as the Japanese Apple. Both groups willing to buy into the slavery/trendiness, and thus any questions as to why they do so make sense only when you consider the fan club aspect. Japanese probably wonder why Americans buy all those Apple products, not realizing the trend factor.

        Nihonjin: Did you see the Sony's new Box Thing? Awesome! Oh, what's that thing you got there, an iPod? Why would anyone buy one of those? I'd just buy Sony's new Box Thing.

        American:Did you see the new
  • They cited "legal and technical issues" for not supporting the transfer of UMD games onto the PSP Go; undoubtedly they couldn't find a way to keep pirated games from being copied.

    This makes no sense. Think about it. Seriously, two-second consideration here. First, this is a platform based solely on downloadable games. If they have problems with piracy, especially rampant piracy cutting into game sales, it makes no sense to develop this platform. So either they have means to prevent it, or it doesn't m

  • by Aceticon (140883) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @06:51AM (#29655287)

    So the PSP was such a good product that people where jailbreaking it and using it for all sorts of things (like playing movies), not just gaming. They were getting their games from independent sources and even playing PS1 games on it. They were playing movies directly from the memory stick without paying for Sony's overpriced movies.

    Sony was selling the PSP at a loss and trying to make it up from overpriced games and overpriced movies. Since people were not buying as many games and movies from Sony as expected this wasn't working.

    The old Sony (from 15 years ago) would've done the following:
    - Open up the console themselves so that people wouldn't need to jailbreak it
    - Pitch it as an open, portable multimedia + gaming device. Sell it for more money because people were buying it for the extra features.

    The new Sony did the following:
    - Tried to patch the holes that allowed for the jailbreaking. These could only be patch with a new version of the console and new holes were discovered within a week of the old ones being patched. Consoles already out before the patch still had the old holes.
    - Came up with a completely new PSP with stronger DRM, such as having the firmware version tied to the games so that new games would force firmware upgrades thus closing existing holes in consoles with older firmware. The new PSP is NOT backwards compatible with the old one, adds no value for consumers (it actually reduces value) and costs more money.

    Yet another situation where Sony shows how they went from a company that "was proud to do the best quality products and could sell them at a premium" to a Sony that "trades the quality-value that their brand name acquired in the past for pushing to consumers inferior products designed to have Sony get paid extra when users actually use their products".

    This is why I stopped buying Sony altogether years ago (I distrust their products and expect them to, by design, force me to pay Sony extra money when use them) and never looked back.

    • The old sony has been dead for almost 20 years, I think the downfall came long before the memory stick and even the media buyout they did, the media division just enforced the shift which already was underway before.
      Remember the mini disk it came before sony bough the film division, it was dead on arrival due to sonys high pricing and the inability to have digital outs as well as their proprietary atrac codec.
      It could have replaced the aging floppy disks, but it did not. The 3.5 inch floppy disk was pretty

  • by Comboman (895500) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @07:06AM (#29655353)
    Putting an optical drive on a portable device didn't make sense, and Sony did the right thing to get rid of it (though a little too late). Load times for games are slow, discs can easily be scratched and (most importantly for a portable device) it kills the battery.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by rarel (697734)
      UMDs could easily be scratched because some genius at SONY R&D decided it would be a good idea to remove the protective sliding cover for whatever reason. Minidiscs have the same form-factor (with slightly cosmetic differences) and a protection over the opening for when the disc is not in use. Just like floppies. They are extremely robust and can last for years without any issue. My first MDs from 12 years ago still work like new.

      Now loading time and battery issues, that's another story. :)

      • by Megane (129182)
        Actually the most fun problem with UMDs is that the clear plastic front piece can become detached and collapse into the back shell.
  • So Sony released the PSP along with their UMD, repeating the same mistake Sony's made since BetaMax. UMDs only work on PSPs, therefore Sony will have the monopoly on the platform. Now it turns out that nobody likes UMDs, and they can be defeated by hacking the firmware and using another proprietary Sony format, MemoryStick, onto which people can load videos that they own.

    So Sony decides to enclose completely the PSP. Hell, I'd be surprised if you even own the hardware.

    The only "victory" Sony had using thi
    • by Megane (129182)
      ...and that's only because they bought out the competition, HD-DVD, making them go away with CASH MONEY.
  • Technical Issues (Score:2, Insightful)

    by TheCRAIGGERS (909877)

    They cited "legal and technical issues" for not supporting the transfer of UMD games onto the PSP Go; undoubtedly they couldn't find a way to keep pirated games from being copied.

    ...Yeah right. When the UMD was first released Sony expected people to re-buy their movies on UMD discs. And now people are surprised the hear that Sony expects them to re-buy games?

    I'd say the only technical issue they ran into was not being able to find a way to charge for the service of transferring your UMD disc to your Go's flash.

  • UMD had to go but... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DrXym (126579) on Tuesday October 06, 2009 @08:17AM (#29655865)
    ... why did Sony not provide a UMD peripheral? Something that people could sync their existing UMD collection over to the new PSP device. Such a device (built into a charging dock for example) could copy the contents of an inserted game/movie disk over to the PSP which would be good to play for a few days before requiring a shorter validation resync.

    It's madness no such device exists since without it (or a robust universal exchange program) Sony has just pissed off millions of potential customers. Who exactly is going to pay more money for a device that is essentially crippled? The only other way I can see a UMD-less working in the short term is if it were packed with phone functionality (and camera) and its cost was then subsidized by the phone networks.

    • The solution is simple: don't buy a PSP Go. There really aren't any technical reasons to buy a Go. The screen is smaller, it's harder to hold on to, the buttons are closer together, it has a mechanical slide that can fail, and it's more expensive. Not to mention that you can download and play games from PSN on a standard PSP.

      • by DrXym (126579)
        I'd actually like a PSP Go since my PSP 1000 is a bit chunky. Fundamentally the device is cute, compact and technically sound. But I see no reason to upgrade while it costs so much and offers no upgrade path. It's no good buying a PSP if it can't play my PSP games. I'm certainly not buying them over again and don't particularly relish being locked into PSN for future purchases either.

        The whole launch is a trainwreck with Sony simultaneously managing to piss off retailers and consumers. Maybe they'll addre

  • by Ceiynt (993620)
    I wonder if this isn't just a test to see how a device will do without physical media for the user. PS4 maybe 100% digital downloads? Sell one time use usb device to upload games to the device, then it shorts itself out, never to be used again? It will kill the second hand market for sure, but how will Wal-mart react?

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