Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Media Games

Ubisoft Says No More Game Manuals 400

Posted by timothy
from the that-would-bug-me dept.
thsoundman writes with this excerpt from The Gamers Blog: "No more manuals? Ubisoft announced last week that they will be ditching the trend of printing instruction manuals for new games under the 'green' initiative. While no other publishers have jumped on that 'green' train just yet, it is likely that others will follow suit. Printed manuals have been part of gaming since you bought PC games in plastic bags. There have been many standout eras for manuals, such as the NES-era booklets to the manuals that accompanied Electronic Arts vinyl-sized game sleeves. Some may argue that the advancement in on-screen contextual commands and first-level tutorials have made the manual pointless, but is this really the case?"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Ubisoft Says No More Game Manuals

Comments Filter:
  • by PolyDwarf (156355) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:44PM (#31942334)

    When no one can play your game due to drm servers being down?

    (come on, you know it's going to be said many times in this thread.. Might as well get it going early :))

    • by thsoundman (1778564) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:58PM (#31942598) Homepage
      Because they add to the overall experience of the game. They give artwork, keyboard/controller commands, they give alot of backstory and on the side they make you actually feel like your getting somting for all the money you just spent. When i spend 60 dollars i want somthing more then a disc. Have you tried "figuring out" how to play NHL10 without the booklet there are over 5 pages of commends in there. Games like Final Fantasy have pages of story, character info, etc. It just gives you somthing tangible that makes your gaming experience that much better.
      • by rilian4 (591569) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @02:02PM (#31942672) Journal
        Solution for PC games is obvious. PDF on the Disc containing every page that would have been printed. I suppose for console games that a URL to visit online where you can download the manual would work but then what if the site goes down or the file is removed...or they might make you setup a "free" account and be forced to provide personal details in order to access the manual. (Yes I know it will get out eventually...)
        • by snowraver1 (1052510) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @02:13PM (#31942912)
          I don't know about you, but I usually read the instruction manual on the crapper. Most of the manuals never get read, but like a previous poster stated, it gives you something tangible with the game.

          "Green" initiative... Money is green
        • by Digicrat (973598) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @03:13PM (#31943992)

          Before you can answer that question, you have to realize that game manuals fall into two, maybe three, categories:

          1) Traditional Instruction Manual with story overview, controls reference, and other useful information. No matter what, such manuals are always essential for quick multiplayer games (ie:Mortal Kombat, Street Fighter, Smash Bros., etc.) for looking up some extra moves while you wait your turn ;-) For some games their useless, but for others their a great reference.

          2) "Collectible" Instruction manuals. These are one-step below the dedicated art books that come with recent games, but still include extensive story, background information, artwork, and more. These won't be going away, though I predict we'll increasingly be seeing them only on "collector's" edition copies.

          3) The Boilerplate Manuals. These are the ones that Ubisoft and others use the most and should go the way of the dinosaur. These manuals are always virtually identical, contain a picture of the controller, copyright notice, and maybe a copy of the description printed on the box. On occasion, these come in thick booklets that trick you into thinking it's type (1) or (2) before you realize that it's just boilerplate * n languages.

          So in summation - if all the publisher's are writing are boilerplate manuals, let's go save some trees. But for those few developers that still invest the time in creating real manuals, those are an important piece of gaming tradition that we don't want to lose.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Man, if there's ever a time when I don't RTFM, it's when I'm playing a new game. For starters, convention has pretty much taught us all what to expect. Second, delays between acquiring a game and playing it, no matter how small, are annoying. Last but not least, I pretty much Google or wikipedia everything these days. Why waste time fishing around for an easily lost pamphlet when a couple of clicks get me the info I need?

        Kudos to Ubisoft. Better for waste, better for their bottom line and practicall
      • Because they add to the overall experience of the game.

        That's great. In a couple of months they will announce that you can buy the manual for a "small additional fee" to go along with the small fee they are charging for demos of the game.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ElKry (1544795)
        You may want to try to read the post itself instead of just answering to the subject...
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by hack slash (1064002)
        Something tells me you've played early 80s computer games (ZX Spectrum, C64 etc.) where the manuals often depict an amazing backstory to what you're about to play - once the tape has finished playing - only to discover the graphics fall way short of the description you just finished reading.

        Ahh those were the days.
    • by Spad (470073)

      Thankfully not a problem any more [rlslog.net]...

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Nahor (41537)
      And more importantly, they haven't found a way to put DRM on a printed document yet. By going digital, they can now use their DRM servers to stop the piracy of instruction manuals.
    • Why bother with manuals when no one can play your game due to drm servers being down?

      As long as you can't play the game, you may as well entertain yourself by leafing through the manual.

  • by JamesP (688957) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:45PM (#31942340)

    the brown paper written in black with anti-piracy codes (remember Sim City?!)

    • by mwvdlee (775178)

      Why brown paper? So one guy had to go through the 5 minute trouble of scanning it and cleaning it up in Photoshop before distributing it?

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by radish (98371)

        I don't know about brown, but a number of games back in the 80's came with black-on-purple code sheets which (it was said) would confuse photocopiers. Personal scanners didn't really exist at the time, these were 8-bit games distributed on tape.

      • by retchdog (1319261)

        This was a long time ago when throwing the manual on the (black and white) office photocopier before lending the disks to your coworkers was a major piracy channel... Scanners were quite rare, and running photoshop on an EGA card would have been a joke.

        Anyway, have to say your sig goes well with the topic of your post.

  • Good. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tool462 (677306) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:46PM (#31942364)

    They've been all but useless for ~20 years anyway. Contextual help and tutorials within the game are usually more useful and intuitive. If I need more help, it's usually easy enough to find what I'm looking for online anyway.

    • Re:Good. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by DeadDecoy (877617) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:53PM (#31942510)
      I dunno, for some games, I've found manuals to be pretty useful: Neverwinter Nights, Civilization, i.e. games with lots of miscellaneous icons and skill trees that require a decent amount of planning. Sure you can put the content in game, but sometimes it's nice to have a reference guide. Plus the art and flavor text is nice sometimes too.
      • by Rary (566291)

        I dunno, for some games, I've found manuals to be pretty useful: Neverwinter Nights, Civilization, i.e. games with lots of miscellaneous icons and skill trees that require a decent amount of planning. Sure you can put the content in game, but sometimes it's nice to have a reference guide. Plus the art and flavor text is nice sometimes too.

        But did you absolutely require that information printed on paper, or would a PDF or HTML file do the job?

  • Yes (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ZekoMal (1404259) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:46PM (#31942368)
    Nobody reads instructions. As noted in older /. articles, nobody even reads Terms of Service, even if they end up surrendering their soul. Instructions are always included in the game itself, and if they aren't, are fairly easy to figure out. I've never used instruction manuals, except for when I'm looking at character bios not included in the game, or artwork.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      I've spent many loading times in Oblivion, Fallout 3, Mass Effect, and Dragon Age, reading manuals. Guess its just me.

      • by discord5 (798235)

        I've spent many loading times in Oblivion, Fallout 3, Mass Effect, and Dragon Age, reading manuals. Guess its just me.

        I never did that for those games. Downloaded them all from steam. But back in the day some games came with fold-out maps, an actual story in the manual, and something that made the experience just that bit more than sitting in front of a keyboard mashing buttons.

        Somehow, not having all those little extras makes it feel like when I buy a physical copy I'm somehow just getting a cardboard box with a CD in it. It's like the companies that produce games no longer like their customers except for their money. Oh,

    • What are you talking about? I haven't read the summary or article.
  • in other words... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:46PM (#31942370)

    they plan on developing only simplistic titles for the brain-dead masses; instead of huge, complex, detailed games that demand printed reference materials.

    • When was the last time you needed a manual for even a complicated game? Neverwinter Nights?

      Oh, wait, no, you didn't. We've pretty much all seen that interface before, and had a good idea of what to do with it and the ruleset.

      In fact, when's the last time you saw a game with totally unique mechanics that weren't remotely intuitive to anyone who has played a game within the genre before?

  • by Manip (656104) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:46PM (#31942380)

    Since games now ship without a manual I am sure all of those savings will be passed on to the end consumer, right?

  • Game Manuals? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by skine (1524819) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:47PM (#31942382)

    I honestly can't remember the last time I used a game manual.

    The only real reason I know of is to find out the control layout, but that's usually included/changeable in-game now.

  • by jandrese (485) <kensama@vt.edu> on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:47PM (#31942384) Homepage Journal
    I have not seen a decent printed manual for a game in about 10 years now. Sometimes they've got some nice fluff or stories, but as the writeup mentioned, in-game tutorials work a lot better. Having the instructions only printed in the manual is an anachronism in this day and age. Manual designers know that too, since most are at best anemic these days. When you download games from Steam you don't get the manual either. It's only an issue if you're attempting to play very old games like the original X-COM. Even then, the manuals are often available as a PDF.
    • by ProppaT (557551) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @02:01PM (#31942666) Homepage

      It's funny, modern instruction manuals are....worthless. There's about 10 pages of front matter, including boilerplate information from the console manufacturer (controller configuration, seizure warnings, etc), ToC, etc. Then there's about 5-10 pages on the actual game. Then once you start the game you go through 30minutes to an hour of non-skippable tutorial. It's obnoxious. How many different ways can you explain to someone to hit the button to jump and the other one to shoot?

      I remember, back when games were much simpler, even stupidly simple games would have much larger instruction books. Dare I say they were even fun to read? They were full of story, jokes, cool art, etc. To this day, I have all the instruction books for my old NES and SNES games. I wouldn't buy a game without them. Now I couldn't care less about them. Which is sad to say because I write technical manuals for a living. I'd be lying if I said that videogame instruction books weren't influential in me going down this career path.

    • by Sigma 7 (266129)

      I have not seen a decent printed manual for a game in about 10 years now.

      Technically, you only need a sheet of paper that contains a list of controls, and other stuff as needed. It may need to span multiple pages depending on how complex the controls become, and any smart designer would place a copy in-game as well.

      However, the manual should at least describe basic game mechanics (e.g. should allow players to successfully min-max something on the first try.)

      Having the instructions only printed in the manual is an anachronism in this day and age.

      I've seen an RTS that listed a whole ton of units in the game manual. For each unit, it only described the actions it coul

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Kemanorel (127835)

      Side note, and more than slightly off topic, but I would so very much like to see the original 2 X-COM games recreated to run on modern systems. No changes to some real-time-turn-based hybrid bullshit, just pure I take my turn then the computer (or online opponent) takes it's turn with destructible environment features. This would even be a good fit as a console game at this point in tech. With everything else getting remade or rereleased for the sake of nostalgia, why not X-COM?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by zero_out (1705074)
        X-COM was, and still is, the greatest game ever created. Even with the horrendous graphics, by today's standards, it's an awesome game. I break it out every couple of years. If the game simply ran natively on today's hardware, and had higher resolution graphics (no 3D, just hi-res sprites), I would be absolutely giddy (and I don't get giddy. Ever).
    • by zero_out (1705074)

      [...]When you download games from Steam you don't get the manual either.[...]

      That's one of the (several) reasons I don't download games from Steam. I buy games, with packaging, and expect a physical manual, even if it is rather worthless. To me, they're a part of the whole package that I buy (not pay for a license). I still have my first PC game CD, with the box and manual. It was Age of Empires. Yeah, I'm a latecomer, I know. Those are the sort of things you don't throw away. They're a bit of nostalgia that remind you of the fun times in life; like photographs from your favo

    • by Spad (470073)

      The switch to DVD movie-style boxes was the real death of the Manual as anything more than a list of key mappings and install instructions. I still have my SimCity 2000 Special Edition, UFO:Enemy Unknown (X-COM:UFO Defense for the 'merkins) & Warcraft 2 manuals and they were works of art - especially the WC2 one with all the drawings by Chris Metzen; they were mini-encyclopaedias back in the day when vast amounts of information about a game wasn't available at the touch of a Google.

      They will be sadly mi

    • Since so many of them stunk, can anybody list which box manuals were actually worth reading?

      Two that come to my mind:

      1) Final Fantasy VII. We had a computer, but we didn't have a Playstation. When FFVII was released to PC, I was so excited. The manual that came w/ the game had a step-by-step game guide of the first "chapter" of the game. It wasn't a complete walkthrough, but for someone who had not played that-intricate a Final Fantasy game before, it was incredibly helpful and informative. It was com

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by noidentity (188756)
      Yeah, around the time of the N64, manuals started getting unenjoyable to read. At that point, instead of a nice clean layout, they started putting dark background images on every page, and crappy game screenshots. Earlier manuals from the NES/SNES era are still fun to read, due to the simpler layout. It's like reading an assembly language manual for a processor (good examples are Zelda: Link's Awakening original non-color version, Survival Kids, even Metal Gear Solid 3 has a fairly nice manual).
  • by dwiget001 (1073738) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:47PM (#31942388)

    No, not "GREEN", more like "It's a helluva lot less expensive to just not print the manuals!"

    On-line help in HTML or PDF form would suffice for a "manual" and often does in many games nowadays.

    Besides, I have seen manuals get smaller and smaller and smaller to the point where they are really just a few pages of basic "How to install game" paragraphs and "How to contact support" *plus* two pages of advertisements for the company's other games, subscriptions, merchandise, etc.

    • No, not "GREEN", more like "It's a helluva lot less expensive to just not print the manuals!"

      Exactly. One of the concepts I learned in psych was that you need to properly frame things to be a benefit to the customer; even if teh goal is simply to save costs. Hence, hotels "Use less water if you reuse a tool" and "Unless you ask we won't change sheets / vacuum during your stay"ather then "we only service the room every other day to save cash."

    • by Narishma (822073)

      Don't forget the two or three blank pages where you're supposed to write who knows what.

  • Home Improvement (Score:5, Insightful)

    by shentino (1139071) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:48PM (#31942412)

    Real men don't read instructions

  • I like them (Score:5, Insightful)

    by linear core (1692640) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:49PM (#31942452)
    What will kids read on the way home from the game store now? I have also found game manuals helpful in many instances where commands and instructions that weren't put into the game were put there. Not every instruction or tip you need to convey can be put into the game without breaking the flow. The game manual helps. Besides, sometimes they're really pretty.
  • by Delusion_ (56114) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:50PM (#31942464) Homepage

    ...either in software form (nothing more fussy than html or pdf, please) or within in-game help, that would merely be a disappointment.

    But what really going on here is that they're turning their manuals from a cost to a profit by outsourcing their manuals to BradyGames, Prima, and other publishers. I'm sick to death of paying for games which need manuals (rts/tbs yes, fps, no), but I'm only provided with a razor thin command reference sheet, if that.

    UbiSoft wins. The game strategy guide industry wins. The customer loses. More of the usual.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      When is the last time that a major RTS hasn't had a campaign mode nearly entirely devoted to showing you all of your units and explaining the mechanics and trees? Starcraft and Warcraft 2 had campaigns where the beginning explained these things; the difference in newer games is the general shrinking of the portion afterwords that you have full access to all units.

      I know that TBS games can be a bit more detailed and usually only give an overview, but since when is learning their mechanics impossible to do fr

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mattbee (17533)

      How is that a loss? There was a time when the game manual had to fire the imagination a little, make up for the chunky graphics, supply a back story, or document some complicated controls, stuff that was difficult/impossible from within the game. Now games have all the technology to explain themselves from the moment they start, and if they can't or don't, they're in trouble. What's wrong with giving some game mapping companies an inside track, folk who do a far more honest job documenting the game than

    • by Xtravar (725372)

      ... seriously? http://gamefaqs.org/ [gamefaqs.org]

    • by Draek (916851)

      For which YOU need manuals. Only games I've needed a manual for in the past decade have been the Europa Universalis and Hearts of Iron series, both available with my purchase in PDF form for free.

      It's a small but important point: after all, there could be somebody else who also needs detailed manuals for FPSs and even if your policy were put in place, he'd complain about paying for only a thin reference sheet.

  • However there are a few games, such as simulations and city building games, such as those created by the late Impressions Games, with vast complexities. Covering this kind of information in a tutorial is a little tedious and the beginners just don't care. It's really for the advanced users who want to understand how all objects interact. So, IMHO there are circumstances where game manuals are warranted, but most of the time I'd say they're not necessary.
  • Most recent games probably don't need manuals anyway. But I, as an avid simulation gamer, still miss the good old times of complex flight sims with huge manuals - think of Falcon. Manuals you actually had to read to be able to fly. Fortunately there are still some niche products along that line. I love my 1600 pages of ring-bound checklists, workflows, operation manuals and documentation for the PMDG MD-11 for Flight Simulator. People who see that on my desk seem to ponder the question whether I am just a n
  • This is good, and I applaud the effort to save paper. As the summary mentioned, in-game tutorials and searchable digital manuals have made the printed manual fairly obsolete. However, I will always fondly remember those hefty manuals that you used to get with a huge role-playing game like Baldur's Gate. I loved flipping through those and reading up on the lore or finding out about an aspect of the game I didn't know about from reading just the basic instructions. Of course, I don't know of any games in rece
    • by Shimbo (100005)

      However, I will always fondly remember those hefty manuals that you used to get with a huge role-playing game like Baldur's Gate. I loved flipping through those and reading up on the lore or finding out about an aspect of the game I didn't know about from reading just the basic instructions.

      It was the Ultima series for me: the manuals, the lore, not to mention the cloth maps and little trinkets. Going forth to do battle with yet another incompatible DOS memory manager. Happy times!

  • Green? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by FonzCam (841867) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @01:57PM (#31942584)

    So to be green they're removing the most environmentally friendly part of the product?

    It'd be a much more green initiative to replace the plastic case with a paper and card case that could include basic controls printed on it's various surfaces. They could even go all out and switch to all digital distribution.

    • Re:Green? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by tepples (727027) <tepples@gmaiBLUEl.com minus berry> on Thursday April 22, 2010 @03:27PM (#31944224) Homepage Journal

      They could even go all out and switch to all digital distribution.

      All-digital distribution isn't fun if you can't get cable or DSL where you live, or if you're trying to squeeze 20 GB of a Blu-ray or multi-DVD game over low-end DSL.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by MattskEE (925706)

      It'd be a much more green initiative to replace the plastic case with a paper and card case that could include basic controls printed on it's various surfaces. They could even go all out and switch to all digital distribution.

      What, you think game disks are analog?

      (And yes I know what you meant ;-) )

  • Ubisoft announced last week that they will be ditching the trend of printing instruction manuals for new games under the 'cost savings' initiative.

    Odds on them passing along the savings to the customer? Zero. But it doesn't matter. Ever since the internet connection required fiasco I won't be buying any of their crap anyway

  • 'Green'? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by zblach (977591)
    The last time I bought a game, it came on a plastic disc in a plastic case, surrounded by cardboard padding, packed into a laminated cardboard box, and then covered in a plastic wrapper. They've got a long way to go before that's 'green'. Besides, of all parts, isn't the manual the only one you'd actually want to have as a hard copy? I could do without the CD, especially with easily available digital distribution.
  • RTFM? (Score:4, Funny)

    by Midnight Thunder (17205) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @02:07PM (#31942776) Homepage Journal

    So now I am going to look stupid telling people to RTFM. I don't know, but RTFCH (read the F. contextual help) just doesn't feel as catchy.

  • Personally, I like having a manual, but I also apparently like losing them. Sure, ditch the print version, but provide for an online manual. It has been important, time and again, to have some form of manual for games. Whether it's understanding an item, having a quick controller reference, or just the nifty character and enemy profiles. Go green, just don't go without.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      They could not make a manual at all, and you would still be able t find what you need about the game online.

      • Sure, as long as it is all in one convenient place - having it in a "manual" format would allow for easy finding, users would have a downloadable copy they could print off if they felt so inclined, and you wouldn't have to rely on webs of forum posts or comments from the community if the developer put on loose bits of info about the game but nothing to the caliber of a well-done manual (not always the case as some manuals are pretty terrible).

  • Now how are we going to advise epileptics that they shouldn't play video games?

  • They'll still have a readme file that I can print out on my dot matrix printer and store in a three ring binder for future reference though right?

    My grandfather actually used to make me do this when I was little, being an old school engineer. God help me if he saw me uncheck that "view readme first" check-box after the installation.

  • With their crappy DRM, I wasn't planning on buying any of their games anyway.

  • Good for them. Not that I really care seeing as I'll never purchase an Ubisoft game again.

  • I thought the global warming folks were freaking out about CO2? Paper is made from trees grown for exactly that purpose. Those trees are young, which means they absorb more CO2 than older trees. Shouldn't we support using paper? New paper also takes less chemicals and such to process than recycling the stuff again as paper.

  • by geekoid (135745)

    "While no other publishers have jumped on that 'green' train just yet it is likely that others will follow suit. "

    Publishers have been going more green for years. Most games I have bought over the last couple of years haven't had a hard manual.

  • I remember when reading the manuals were the ONLY way to figure out how to play a game. On Atari 2600 games and the likes you would often need them to figure out what those little pixelated blobs were supposed to be on the screen and what to do with them, and the manual certainly wouldn't fit in 4k bytes of rom. On text based Infocom interactive fiction games you would always need to read through an example session in the manual to figure out the basic vocabulary understood by the particular game.

    Utilities

  • M.S. hasn't shipped a, even in pdf, for years. Adobe doesn't ship manuals with it's product, pdf or otherwise all the info is on line. I have a large collection of mostly useless manuals. Good riddance.
  • Yes. Glad we had this discussion.

  • ...servers as the electricity costs/footprint alone is much more hurtful than a dead tree manual. Green initiative my ass, lying sack of cheap bastards.

  • global warming global cooling global dimming global skimming

    • Black and white manuals. Why would you give me a BW manual if the game is in color?
    • Availability of digital manuals.
    • Errors or manuals which aren't up-to-date with current game versions and patches.
    • The internets!
  • Next month there will probably be a headline like "Ubisoft says no more games". Talk about savings!
  • >> Ubisoft will be ditching the trend of printing instruction manuals for new games under the 'green' initiative ...and of course its just coincidence that it also happens to save them a lot of money.

    So I guess they will be passing thew savings onto us then? No I thought not...

  • I've always been a fan of nicely designed manuals. But the last time I've seen a good one was back in the 80s. Everything since then has been halfhearted, poorly designed junk. Few people seem to read them. I'll flip through them once myself and never refer to them again. Might as well get rid of them and include instructions in the game. I don't mean annoying tutorials that get in the way of me just playing the game. I mean a separate set of instructions I can read through at my leisure.

  • well, if you need a manual to play a video game at least, which should have intuitive controls... I always thought of the manual as being a hold over from board games like monopoly... people read the book because the BOOK was the rules. With video games, the game itself enforces the rules, so there is not much need to write them down.

    The kind of stuff you DO need to read for certain games will never be published in a manual anyway like drop percentages or cookie cutter strategies, the internets are much
  • I'm tired of this whole green fad already. It has turned into an excuse for any company to be cheap and charge you more for less while under the guise of doing something for the environment. Most stores are now charging for plastic bags, not because they may be expensive to make or because they flat out want to make a profit on them, but because it's 'for the environment'. Give me a break.
  • My friends and I used to buy games based in part on the manuals. One of the best manuals ever came from Dynamix when they released Red Baron. It was a very well illustrated history of aviation and aerial warfare during World War One. Another great manual was the Falcon 3.0 bible. Back in the day you could practically judge the depth and quality of a simulator based on the size of the manual. Who can forget all of the old Sierra Online games and the manuals that contained clues about how to play the gam

"No problem is so formidable that you can't walk away from it." -- C. Schulz

Working...