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Nintendo Wii Games

Wii Could Be What the Doctor Ordered 156

Posted by kdawson
from the unlikeliest-lede-to-a-health-story dept.
crimeandpunishment writes "The American Heart Association and Nintendo are teaming up to promote Wii. The popular games can be branded with the AHA's logo, to indicate that they're considered a healthy choice. As part of the deal, Nintendo will donate $1.5 million to the AHA. The Heart Association is concerned about childhood obesity, and now concedes that its campaign for traditional forms of exercise just isn't getting through."
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Wii Could Be What the Doctor Ordered

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  • by maugle (1369813) on Monday May 17, 2010 @07:44PM (#32246808)
    Does it really count as a donation if they foresee these AHA-branded games generating at least that much in profit?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Yes.

      There's nothing wrong with a mutually-beneficial arrangement that supports a good cause. Nintendo is donating money. Nothing about 'donating' implies you lose something. People would never donate if it did - they always get something out of it, even if its just the feeling that they're doing right in the world.

      Sure, it's easier when it's monetary. Sure, it's not as altruistic. But it's still a donation. And it can still do good.

    • Does it really count as an endorsement if the AHA is getting 1.5M for it?

      Seems to me to be a fairly straight foreword business deal.

    • by arth1 (260657)

      Wot, like "Take On Me - Multiplayer Edition"?

    • Does it really count as a donation if they foresee these AHA-branded games generating at least that much in profit?

      Yes. I guess you could instead call it a "good faith investment" since it's not certain to pay off for nintendo.

    • Does it really count as a donation if they foresee these AHA-branded games generating at least that much in profit?

      Yes.

      a.) The definition of 'donation' doesn't have anything to do with motivation.

      b.) They don't actually have the money until they get it. Their prediction of the future may be correct, but it's still a guess.

      c.) There's nothing to single out Nintendo over any other company in this context.

      I mean no offense, but I honestly don't understand why anybody spent their hard-earned mod points on your post.

    • by pclminion (145572)
      You can make some money, then donate it to charity. Or, you could donate to charity, and HOPE you'll make enough money to cover it. In the first case, you risk nothing. In the second case, you risk a bunch of money. So not only are they donating to charity, they're doing it with money they don't even have yet. When's the last time YOU took out a loan just to donate the whole thing to charity? And you're criticizing them for it?
      • So not only are they donating to charity, they're doing it with money they don't even have yet

        We're talking about Nintendo here, not some recent startup. They made 2.45 billion dollars profit from March last year to this year - and that's down on the year before because of the poor global economy. They're in the "risking nothing" category with this one.

    • Ofcourse Nintendo is trying to sell more games. That's their business. But what's a more friendly way to do this? Supporting a health-related cause or removing features from your product? (I'm looking at you Sony)
  • Sort of healthy (Score:5, Informative)

    by MichaelSmith (789609) on Monday May 17, 2010 @07:51PM (#32246880) Homepage Journal

    Often on the weekends my sons friends will be at out place to use the wii. They spend more time jumping around in front of the TV than they would spend with a different console but I usually take them out to the school oval to kick a soccer ball around as well. I am sure they get more health benefit from being outside then from being in front of the wii.

    How about AHA's logos on normal sporting equipment. Footballs, etc?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Its the diet soft drink of game consoles -- healthy relative to gaming that requires no physical exertion at all.

    • by kjart (941720)

      How about AHA's logos on normal sporting equipment. Footballs, etc?

      Probably because there isn't any reason to do so - it's implicit in that the AHA encourages physical activity. Is someone going to see the AHA logo on a football and suddenly realize that it might be healthy to play sports? Doubtful.

      Plus, there is the differentiation factor. Is there any reason why the AHA would hypothetically endorse one brand of sporting equipment over another? No, they are essentially all the same from their perspective. The value of attaching the logo to the Wii is that it might cause

    • by syousef (465911)

      Often on the weekends my sons friends will be at out place to use the wii. They spend more time jumping around in front of the TV than they would spend with a different console but I usually take them out to the school oval to kick a soccer ball around as well. I am sure they get more health benefit from being outside then from being in front of the wii.

      How about AHA's logos on normal sporting equipment. Footballs, etc?

      I'm fat and have a sendentary job. Do you think that if I run the health benefits past my employer he'll let me stay home and play my Wii for a few months? Because if he'll do that I can claim it and the games on tax as a necessary part of my job too.

  • Neat (Score:2, Interesting)

    by adeft (1805910)
    I've been toying with getting one of these for the exact reason to trick myself into doing some sort of activity while I'm idle. Now this just needs to coincide with a new advertising campaign and price-cut :)
  • Dogs (Score:5, Funny)

    by Nidi62 (1525137) on Monday May 17, 2010 @08:04PM (#32247064)
    The AHA should endorse stray rabid rottweilers. They are a great way to get people more interested/involved with running.
    • its also a great way to promote interest in firearms!
    • Re:Dogs (Score:4, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 17, 2010 @08:51PM (#32247462)

      You don't have to outrun the rabid rottweiler, you just have to outrun your friends...

      A message from the AHA

      • by natehoy (1608657)

        Hey,

          - outrun your friends, you lose weight and lower the chance of getting a heart attack.
          - get caught by the rottie, you die of dog-attack injuries, not of a heart attack.

        About the only downside is if you die of a heart attack in panic from running from the dog, and the dog'll eat the evidence.

        So no matter how you slice it, this is a win-win for the AHA.

      • by tehcyder (746570)

        You don't have to outrun the rabid rottweiler, you just have to outrun your friends...

        That's why you should always carry a small revolver, a little bullet in one of their feet should be enough to give you that edge.

    • by antdude (79039)

      http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/85bd6f85f7/white-women-s-workout [funnyordie.com]

      Funny, but racist though. :P

  • . . .but it is not what I would call a healthy lifestyle choice. There are lots of sports and other active hobbies that are inherently fun and also a nice break from staring at a screen.

  • I have spent some time on some of those games, and yes, they're definitely exercise. More than I get playing with other stuff. (And if I don't want to exercise, well, there's other games for the Wii.)

    I think there should be more exercise available in console gaming than hurling controllers and yelling "fuck".

  • At least one small part of our society isn't shunning new technology like the plague.
  • If they GIVE it to me. I'm not going to buy it.

  • Wii Could Be What the Doctor Ordered

    Tomorrow I'm gonna go see my doctor and ask him a medical prescription for Metroid: Other M.

  • Virtual vs. Physical (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Kr1ll1n (579971) on Tuesday May 18, 2010 @12:09AM (#32248898)
    I used to sit on my ass all the time and play video games. Now, any chance I get, and it is decent weather (sunny, cloudy, or windy, but not rainy) I am outside disc golfing. This includes less than 30 degrees outside or over 90 degrees, to me it doesn't matter. I just love it. I never understood how some people consider the gym exercise, or a video game console. In both scenarios you are in a climate-controlled environment, more than capable of just hitting your own internal, or a machines' external, off button. It just isn't the same as actually being outside doing something. I do admit I need more weight training though. Guess it is time to join another bowling league. It's amazing how much upper body strength you can develop throwing a 14-16lb ball an average of 60 times in 2 hours.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by feepness (543479)

      It's amazing how much upper body strength you can develop throwing a 14-16lb ball an average of 60 times in 2 hours.

      Not to mention lifting a 12 ounce drink a couple hundred times...

    • by brkello (642429)

      I don't really get your argument. I play soccer often, which I would argue is a heck of a lot more exercise than disc golf. I didn't see any real changes in my body until I started doing P90X workouts inside my home. I don't think whether the climate is controlled has anything to do with a workout...it is how hard you push yourself and the quality of the exercise you are doing. I am not trying to put down disc golf, but unless you are actually running after the disc when you throw it, it isn't going to ben

  • Is it just me, or is it a sad day when the American Heart Association has to admit defeat and admit that waving your arms around in front of a TV can be counted as progress in promoting health ?

  • Excuse: It’s what the doctor ordered. ;)

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