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Xfire Purchased, Team Leaving 161

Posted by kdawson
from the chat-on dept.
phorce phed and several other readers sent news that a system notification was sent out this evening through the Xfire IM client, to wit: "Xfire was bought by new owners today. Most of the team that has built Xfire over the last six years is leaving. We enjoyed working for you for the last 127 releases and wish we could stay to create the next 127. Good bye, good luck, and game on. — The Xfire Team." According to Wikipedia, the new owner is 3D Realms.
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Xfire Purchased, Team Leaving

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 02, 2010 @06:46PM (#33117834)

    From what I've heard it's been edited multiple times since the announcement and both times was a different name of the buyer. Just wait until something official turns up.

    • by sopssa (1498795) *

      3D Realms seems unlikely and the random edit was only in Wikipedia for a few minutes. And why does the summary link to the static "down" html page? The website is up and working. Nice twisting there.

      But really, the previous owner was Music Television. I always thought that was a little bit weird.

      • by tomhudson (43916)

        Because that static page is what xfire is showing the public. Go to the forums instead: http://www.xfire.com/forums/182619/ [xfire.com]

    • by crossmr (957846) on Monday August 02, 2010 @08:30PM (#33118626) Journal

      You do realize who posted this story right? If you went by his house and scrawled "Aliens ate Sarah Palin using the new X75 fork from IBM" on his sidewalk in chalk it'd be here the next day as gospel.

  • by cosm (1072588) <thecosm3 AT gmail DOT com> on Monday August 02, 2010 @06:46PM (#33117836)
    3D Realms decided that in order to get DNF completed, they needed 100% X-Fire integration, otherwise DNF would remain DNF, Forever. [wikipedia.org]
  • no buyout. (Score:5, Funny)

    by RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) <{taiki} {at} {cox.net}> on Monday August 02, 2010 @06:47PM (#33117846)

    At 127 releases; they were on the verge of an 8 bit signed integer overflow. I suspect one of the managers panicked and convinced the CEO to sell before they had a chance to launch another and have to start over from scratch anyway.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 02, 2010 @06:48PM (#33117858)

    Not according to Wikipedia -- according to some random edit made to wikipedia with no source and reverted minutes later. Given DNF jokes, I hardly think this bears mentioning.

    • by hedwards (940851)
      It's technically possible, however, it's a long enough shot that we can pretty much dismiss it out of hand. In order for that to happen, Take-two would have to be giving up the lawsuit and somebody would have to be coming up with the money. Definitely possible, but highly, highly unlikely. I'm guessing that the edit was a joke.
  • By who I don't know, go look at xfire's main page.
    • by Fumus (1258966)

      I would be happy if Valve bought them. Xfire is a rather bad piece of software nowadays when compared to what Steam has managed. No detection or anything, in Steam you just add the app from a list of installed software on your computer and it Just Works (TM). Xfire on the other hand simply refuses to support 64-bit systems and out of maybe fifty games I played five had the overlay functioning.

  • 1: The buyout was so huge that they all decided to "go out on top" with a huge retirement package.
    2: The team was so unhappy with the terms of Viacom's selling of the company that they are all leaving in lock-step.

    I'm, unfortunately, leaning towards the second option as it seems more realistic. I always knew the Viacom buyout would end in tears, I just didn't know it would take this long.

  • by WankersRevenge (452399) on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:13PM (#33118058)
    As of late, Slashdot seems to be phoning it in at best. I've been following the site for years and I've never seen such an apathetic disregard to both the site and the community from the editors. Lately, stories have either been incredibly sensational or just downright retarded. Or hell, even troll'ish. I'm wondering if Taco and company should just hang it up and try something new. Give people with some fire in their belly a shot. I don't know ... when you're citing wikipedia as a breaking news source, you gotta be wondering if what you're scraping is the bottom of the barrel, or the pile of shit underneath it.

    And by the way ... it's all right to change the Microsoft icon. It was funny twelve years ago. It's kind of retarded now. Especially since the company now looks to be run by the three stooges after a weekend bender.
    • by Threni (635302)

      I agree about the Microsoft icon. Use it for Apple. I can't imagine what you'd use for Microsoft though.

      • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        I agree about the Microsoft icon. Use it for Apple. I can't imagine what you'd use for Microsoft though.

        A picture of a giant bald ape?
      • by maccodemonkey (1438585) on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:25PM (#33118134)

        "I can't imagine what you'd use for Microsoft though."

        I thought the three stooges sounded pretty good as an icon for Microsoft.

        • by westlake (615356)

          I thought the three stooges sounded pretty good as an icon for Microsoft.

          It's not.

          The Stooges were in their prime in 1940. The Borg made their first appearance in Star Trek:TNG in 1989. Cowboy Bebop aired in 1998.

          Slashdot could stand to look a little less adolescent and a little more trend-forward.
             

          • "The Stooges were in their prime in 1940. The Borg made their first appearance in Star Trek:TNG in 1989. Cowboy Bebop aired in 1998.

            Slashdot could stand to look a little less adolescent and a little more trend-forward."

            At the rate Hollywood is going, they'll probably do a Three Stooges reboot within the next five years. Then'll it'll be brand new again.

      • by KiwiRed (598427) on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:30PM (#33118172)
        The parent post has a good suggestion; the three stooges after a weekend bender.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by V!NCENT (1105021)

        A chair with motion blur :)

        And for Apple you use Steve heil!

      • by Cloud K (125581)

        Well, Bill Gates has pretty much nothing to do with Microsoft any more so yeah it's outdated. I think an ape or a flying chair would probably suffice. "What do you want to throw today?"

        As for /. we are still here so it can't be that bad. It does compare to the tabloids (UK) with regard to its sensationalism, bias and quality of "journalism". But just like the tabloids, if you don't take it seriously and instead treat it as entertainment, it's much easier to appreciate.

    • by JustOK (667959)

      i heard they're going to turn slashdot into a giant invisible hot buffet table and then sell it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Agreement on the opinion of /., recently it seems to have lost it's Mojo.

      I like the MS icon. It recalls the days when MS really was something to worry about and is way better than one of Balmer photoshoped to look like Bozo the Clown, which would be my choice.

      To describe MS's current managment as "the three stooges after a weekend bender." is overrating MS's managment and insulting the three stooges. The Stoogies were way more innovative.
    • by wowbagger (69688) on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:32PM (#33118208) Homepage Journal

      Considering that Slashdot didn't even bother to report on this New York Times story about Slashdot [nytimes.com] (even though it appeared in the Firehose [slashdot.org] twice [slashdot.org] (at least), but they DID report on The Science of Caddyshack [slashdot.org] (in Idle), are you surprised?

      (oh, BTW mods - I really don't give a shit about karma anymore - that's how big a "joke" Slashdot has become. Prove me right about this place swirling the drain....)

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by blahbooboo (839709)
        Where should we long time Slashdotters go then?
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by EllF (205050)

          Where should we long time Slashdotters go then?

          Pay Rusty a visit at www.kuro5hin.org. Then you'll really pine for the old days.

          • Where should we long time Slashdotters go then?

            Pay Rusty a visit at www.kuro5hin.org. Then you'll really pine for the old days.

            I'm not sure I see what you mean ...

            "Pissing in the shower (3.00 / 3) (#23) [kuro5hin.org]
            by rusty on Fri May 28, 2010 at 03:41:16 PM EST

            ...is environmentally responsible. You use gallons less water than if you showered and pissed separately.

            Showering in piss alone would be even better. "

          • At one point a couple years ago i tried to like that site and just couldn't get into it.
        • by el_nino (4271)

          I'm sorry, that information is only available to users with the Member of the {1,2,3,4,5} Digit UID Club achievement.

      • by NeutronCowboy (896098) on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:44PM (#33118288)

        Some interesting excerpts from the article:
        "However this relatively narrow focus means that Slashdot has not grown to have broader appeal, like StumbleUpon and Digg. "
        "In addition, Slashdot has historically favored stories submitted from traditional media, over 'new media' such as blogs. Both of these things have made Slashdot seem behind the times and a bit too closed minded."
        "Likewise, library student @battmutler commented that Slashdot "seems to always be 12-36 hours behind the curve.""
        "However the impact that this community has on the social Web is minimal, according to Woopra's statistics. "

        Seriously? The issue is that Slashdot is 12 hours behind "the curve"? It's impact is minimal on the social web? It's not Digg? That's just fucking retarded.

        Let me summarize why I read Slashdot and not Digg or random blogs: I don't care if I'm behind 12 hours. I don't care about reading stories found at digg and StumbleUpon. I don't care to have an impact on the social web.

        I read Slashdot for two reasons: it gives me a broad overview of what's going in topics I find interesting, and the commentary is just about as good as ever - or as bad, depending on your take.

        • by raddan (519638) * on Monday August 02, 2010 @07:59PM (#33118366)
          I think you bring up some an important point: /. is not about breaking news. It may have been back in the earlier days (when tech reporting was still largely on paper), but I don't think that ever was the focus. The thing that still draws me here, after ten years of reading, is the community.

          The NYT article contends that /. has lost traffic without providing a single shred of evidence to support this. Ten years ago, social media was largely unheard of, except for the few geeks who came from places like USENET or BBS scene. I think /.'s base is still largely those people. So the site doesn't draw the crowds. BFD. That's why I come here. I like that narrow focus. The instant ./ tries to follow in Digg's footsteps, I'm outta here. Anyway not growing and losing are two completely different things, NYT!

          We've probably lost a few great commentators over the years, but it's likely not because ./ isn't trendy enough for them. It's because the stories aren't nerdy enough anymore. Hey editors: we want more science stories. Challenge us. I'd personally like to see ./ pick up more cutting-edge research (like computer science and computer engineering journal articles), because that's when the broad base of knowledge in the readership really shows, and where ./'s value is head and shoulders above the other "social media" sites out there.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by unity (1740)
            "The thing that still draws me here, after ten years of reading, is the community. "
            ^That.
            and most especially this:
            "We've probably lost a few great commentators over the years, but it's likely not because ./ isn't trendy enough for them. It's because the stories aren't nerdy enough anymore. Hey editors: we want more science stories. Challenge us. I'd personally like to see ./ pick up more cutting-edge research (like computer science and computer engineering journal articles), because that's when the bro
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by cmholm (69081)

            Re: not growing v. losing... exactly. If someone wants to see a losing site, surf to kuro5hin.org. Once in a blue moon I'll surf there to see what's up, and find that the leading posts haven't changed in weeks. I could probably host the site on my DSL connection.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              Yeah, k5 used to be great back in 2001. RIP.
              • Wasn't that the one that went invite-only, or closed new membership completely, or something like that?

                • Nope, k5 was open to anyone. In the early century, it had a nicely varied selection of topics with a pretty advanced CMS (called Scoop), but a combination of things killed it. When the war drums started, the major (and practically only) topic became Iraq. There was a troll infestation, and an ill fated attempt to extract revenue from the community for yachts and monocles. By 2004-5, most of the early members had left.
          • by john83 (923470)
            I'm a much more recent arrival at slashdot than that. An engineering PhD, I also come here for the technical focus and for the commentary. The community really shows its knowledge base in topics in computer science, astronomy and maybe particle physics, and its passions in copyright and other areas of IP, privacy and human rights. When the stories drift away from those areas, the comments can be fairly inane.
        • by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Monday August 02, 2010 @08:08PM (#33118430) Homepage Journal

          The issue is that Slashdot is 12 hours behind "the curve"?

          Can I let you all in on a little secret?

          "The Curve" does not exist. It's a concept created by press agents and PR flacks to try to force media outlets to jump on their bogus stories before taking the time to make sure they're not complete bullshit. It's a far sight more important to get it right than to get it fast, but our corporate media has gotten it backwards. The worst part is that they try to cover up their incompetence with assertions like "I had to go with it, it was breaking news" or "we didn't want to be scooped by our competitor".

          Have any of you not read a superior in-depth, accurate article on a topic because some tabloid had gotten to it first with a lot of crap? Do any of you read Slashdot because you expect to be among the first to read about a "breaking story"?

          Now there's even a further reason why people are pushing "breaking stories": because then they can get out in front and try to shape the way the story is told. They can get away with that because most people are pretty dumb. So if someone comes out with a breaking story, let's say that "So and so, who is black, admits to being a racist and is cheered by the audience, which was also black" it's not going to matter that the whole thing was completely fabricated, because it confirmed a bunch of stupid people's small-mindedness (and small-minded people just love to have their small-mindedness confirmed and affirmed). But if you're someone who maybe tries to be aware of what's going on in the world, and you see this story picked up by the number one cable news network (this is all purely hypothetical) and then repeated on the numbers two and three networks because they don't want to be scooped, and you buy into the story, you're going to look like a complete horse's ass when you find out that it was all bullshit to begin with. You're going to feel used, and sullied and well, kind of stupid for being in such a goddamn hurry that you'd pay any attention to the number one cable news network to begin with (hypothetically).

          So you know what? Fuck "the curve". You don't have to be ahead of it any more than you have to be "outside the box" or "in the know" or "in touch" because none of those things matter as long as you're capable of a little discernment.

          • by snero3 (610114)

            Could not agree more!

          • by Aceticon (140883) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @03:18AM (#33120692)

            Funilly enough this ties back to the crisis of news reporting:
            - There is no more in-depth news reporting in daily news media: the ones that on their own words are at or ahead of the "curve" just parrot events, hear-saying and gossip.

            In fact, thinking about it, the main reason I come to Slashdot is for the further in-depth analysis which are the comments.

            For example, just look at some of the articles about the Internet filter in Australia:
            - You'll see comments from ozzies explaining how the current Australian government has to pander to politicians from a specific conservative state to keep support for other laws.
            - You'll see comments explaining how the state is set-up in Australia (i.e. the dual-chamber system)
            - You'll see technology comments on the technical viability of such sytems.
            - You'll be pointed out other similar systems in other countries and past news about those systems.

            When was the last time that any mainstream daily news media actually had an article about some political decision in some country of other and actually explained the political background in that country and/or pointed out similar decisions in other countries and subsequent results?

            In fact, when was the last time that any mainstream daily news media had an article about basic human rights, liberty and/or privacy?

            An this is not just limited to ideological subjects:
            - Go to articles about medicine and you're likelly to find comments from doctors.
            - Go to articles about a scientific area and you're likelly to find comments from researchers in that area.
            - Go to (the early) articles about the oil-spill in the Gulf and you'll find comments from people that work in propection in the oil industry.

            For all the dross, baseless opinionating and ad hominem attacks, almost any Slashdot article together with it's comments has more in-depth reporting than almost any "news story" in daily mainstream news media today.

            PS: I say "daily" news media because I believe some of the weekly and monthly magazines - you know, the ones behind the curve - do have more in-depth news reporting.

        • by crossmr (957846)

          Seriously? The issue is that Slashdot is 12 hours behind "the curve"? It's impact is minimal on the social web? It's not Digg? That's just fucking retarded.

          12 hours is very generous. About 1/2 of the stories I see on slashdot were on digg, not 12 hours ago, but 2-3 days ago.
          A few hours behind is fine. But when we're talking days, when the rest of the internet has moved on, it gets a bit much.

          Especially when slashdot is reporting some inaccurate information that was already cleared up days ago. That is when

          • by NotBorg (829820)

            But when we're talking days, when the rest of the internet has moved on, it gets a bit much.

            Let them move on. I still see plenty of insightful commentary about the subject matter that isn't found other places. People come here for the user generated content that happens despite poor summaries.

            I'm with PopeRatzo above. Fuck the out of control bandwagon.

            Much of the good content isn't really that time sensitive. A good article about a research project is still relevant and interesting for some time publish

            • by crossmr (957846)

              The problem isn't simply that they've moved on. it is that Slashdot has turned around and summarized the story with something that was debunked 2 days before it made it to Slashdot because they're so far behind the curve. Slashdot will actually post some of that sensational news a day or two after another site and act like its new and that the rest of the internet hasn't already clued in that it is junk.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by kiddygrinder (605598)
            current front page of digg:

            3 Best Performances by Paul Rudd
            Google brings translation tool in Google Docs Suite! | Crazy
            Tin Man, How Can I Ever Thank You (GIF)
            Prey Fish Turns Predator (this one isn't too bad actually, i was shocked it wasn't an animated gif)
            20 Classic Opening Lines In Books

            etc etc etc, they can keep this shit tbh
        • by Cylix (55374) *

          I like where they stated, ", Slashdot "drives close to 0% of traffic to the sites Woopra measures.""

          Who the fuck is woopra?

          There are two standing issues I have with this statement which make it a non-issue.

          I come to slashdot for the technical discussion on the matter and there is a good deal of user generated content. This is exactly why meme's have developed regarding TFA. It is considered roughly the norm to read the user content above the link posted because slashdot users cannot be bothered with such mu

          • Apparently a web analysis tool like Google Analytics... but in REAL TIME!!!

            Used by 100k sites, whatever that's worth.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by tomhudson (43916)
        The nytimes story is beyond stupid. slashdot is not digg, and if it became like digg, And hackernews? Come off it.

        Why would anyone want slashdot to became like that piece of sh*t known as facebook (if there's one site that has a worse UI than slashdot it HAS to be facebook). Tis is a tech web site, not myspace.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by snero3 (610114)

        Considering that Slashdot didn't even bother to report on this New York Times story about Slashdot [nytimes.com] (even though it appeared in the Firehose [slashdot.org] twice [slashdot.org] (at least),

        I can see why they didn't bother to report that NT times story, it is utter sh!t. I am sorry but really there is nothing news worthy in the whole piece. Maybe their point has some weight to it but the way there reported it definitely didn't. They could have (and probably did) just of made it up.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Arykor (966623)
        NYT says:

        Slashdot Struggles to Remain Relevant in The Social Web

        Hah! Pretty funny coming from a NEWSPAPER...

        • by steelfood (895457)

          No kidding. I laughed when I read that.

          And the "data" is a joke, considering how many users block the very same tools used to gather the data. But I'm not interested in how many people come to the site. I'm more interested in what they have to say. And out of all the sites out there, I think Slashdot's users still have the most interesting (informative, and insightful) things to say. Sure, there are other niche sites where the users know more about a particular topic. But here, there's guaranteed to be at l

      • Considering that Slashdot didn't even bother to report on this New York Times story about Slashdot

        Interesting article. Slashdot isn't a big social media site. Social media is generally the term that journalists use for sites like Facebook and MySpace. They compare Slashdot traffic to; Stumble Upon, Digg, Reddit (never been to any of those on purpose) and Hacker News (never heard of it). And then we are asked to respond to the article via Twitter. (never used it)

        There is good and bad about Slashdot, ther

      • I can certainly see why someone would not want to post an article stating my site is losing relevance. At worst, people agree with that, and it hurts me. At best, people consider the whole thing a troll and start drama, and yes I know /. loves drama. Either way, the end result isn't good.

      • by Fulkkari (603331)
        I'm sorry, but the NYT story was just stupid. I think I'm like many others in here: I come here for the news and the discussion. I don't care about the "social media". I don't want to have any "Facebook and Twitter integration". I don't care about what some guy wrote on his blogpost. And I don't care if some article is a day or half a day late - hardly ever are news really that important. And if I did not follow the link, then I probably just did not think the topic was worth my time.
    • by zullnero (833754)
      Oh, come on. You completely missed the fact that most of the tech news was probably posted at Engadget a day or two before.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by westlake (615356)

      it's all right to change the Microsoft icon. It was funny twelve years ago. It's kind of retarded now. Especially since the company now looks to be run by the three stooges after a weekend bender.

      The geek is easily distracted by glitz:

      In the most recent three months, Microsoft earned $4.52 billion in profits, versus Apple's $3.25 billion and Google's $1.8 billion. Lost from view is Microsoft's very best story -- its transformation into a powerhouse supplier of the specialized software that meets the comple

    • I approve using a 3 Stooges pic in place of the Microsoft Borg pic. Do we have a third?
    • by Hadlock (143607)

      It would appear they at least recently hired kdawson, who is of the same "quantity over quality" mentality of cory doctorow. That's one problem with the site. All the stories at the beginning of the week are terrible, and lo and behold, they're released to the front page by kdawson. There's a huge discrepency in story quality, headline and commentary depending on who posts them.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      Sorry if I'm wrong about this, but aren't slashdot stories submitted by users and voted up or down by users in the firehose? Editors just OK the highest rated ones... They don't do much else, from my observation.

      You're right about wikipedia, of course.

    • I have the simular sensation, and not just this site but alot of fluffy content: The internet was a geek-out place for the last decade.

      Now it's just like "interaction television" and advertizing is taking over wheras it used to be a common technological playground.

      I wonder who still is getting experimental instead of "studying frameworks", and trying to figure things out?

      News online is diluted and reintrepreted from only a few main sources (everything is echo'd around, reaggregated, reposted, retweeted,

  • Looking around (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    xfire itself [xfire.com]

    Team Leaving

    August 2, 2010--Xfire has been purchased by another company. Most of the team that has brought you Xfire for the last 6 years is leaving, including me. We've enjoyed our time and I personally am sad that I was only able to do 127 releases. Good bye and game on!

    --- Chris

    Kotaku [kotaku.com]

    Kotaku has tried to reach Xfire for additional comment through a press inquiry email address. Any that comes will be updated here.

    So in other words, 3D Realms seems more of a rumor than anything. Hey, let's just say EA bought it. Or Curse?

  • by rakslice (90330) <.rakslice. .at. .gmx.net.> on Monday August 02, 2010 @08:20PM (#33118536) Homepage Journal

    Step 1: Edit Wikipedia article to make outrageous claim.
    Step 2: Submit story about the news to /.
    Step 3: ???
    Step 4: Profit.

    Discuss.

    • by crossmr (957846)

      step 3 is wave a piece of cheese in front of kdawson's face.

    • by tomakaan (673394)
      An Xfire system wide message did go out making the same announcement that was edited to Wikipedia. The cited source may have been poor but it is not an outrageous claim.
      • by rakslice (90330)

        Sorry, I didn't really clarify: the outrageous claim I'm talking about is that the "the new owner is 3D Realms." 3D Realms is a company that recently cancelled the main project it had under development, laid off most of its staff, and is facing a breach of contract lawsuit from the publisher. I would have a hard time believing an announcement that 3D Realms acquired any company even if it was confirmed in 10 different major newspapers.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 02, 2010 @09:31PM (#33119024)

    Goodbye, Au Revoir, Da Svida, Auf Wiedersehen
    2010-08-02 5:52 PM PDT
    Xfire has been sold by MTV / Viacom to Titan Gaming, a startup. The vast majority of the remaining staff has been laid off.

    There is no official press release at this time.

    As a Web Developer who has been with this company full-time for 4+ years, I'm sad to have to pack up all of the posters from my office walls, though MTV has been trying to sell us for some time now.

    I received about 800 messages in the minutes after the system broadcast went out. If I don't respond to your messages, please understand that it's nothing personal.

    The Xfire service itself, as far as I know, will continue. A million people a day log into the Xfire client and FOUR million unique visitors use the website each week. No one in their right mind, in this author's humble opinion, would walk away from that kind of userbase by terminating the program.

    Thank you all for your support!

    I have always believed in Xfire, and our community of users has played a big part in that. Together, we made Gaming History.

    source [xfire.com]

  • Massive quit (Score:4, Interesting)

    by dargaud (518470) <[ten.duagradg] [ta] [2todhsals]> on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:55AM (#33120354) Homepage
    Just a general question, does it ever happen that the employees of a company all quit after said company changes owners? Then the company is suddenly worthless if it's based on intellectual stuff like software, right? So is the law OK with it or can the new owners sue or whatever ?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      I imagine this would be part of the buyout proposal if it matters to the purchasing company. You'd have to notify every employee and have them agree to terms of employment with the new owner (which may just be the same terms, but not necessarily). I mean, you can't force people to work at a certain place, so you'd have to new contracts set up to retain the employees. Of course that means you have to spend longer in negotiations with more people knowing details of the deal, which increases the likelihood of

    • by moro_666 (414422)

      ' So is the law OK with it or can the new owners sue or whatever ?'

      sue whom ? it's their own failure in the purchase process if they failed to set up sufficient benefits for the existing employees. suing one self is not that profitable.

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