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PlayStation (Games) Privacy Games Entertainment

Playstation To Restore Services This Week 174

Posted by timothy
from the no-schwag-for-geohot-I-bet dept.
iSimon19 writes with word that after last week's unscheduled service disruption and security breach, "On their blog last night, Playstation representatives announced they were restoring services throughout the week. This also included giving all users a month of Playstation Plus free, as well as select downloads for free with their 'Complimentary Offering and "Welcome Back" Appreciation Program.'"
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Playstation To Restore Services This Week

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  • Better (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tripleevenfall (1990004) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @10:38AM (#35990556)

    Better would be some kind of detailed explanation of how the hell this could have happened in the first place, and what they have done to make sure it won't happen again...

    • Re:Better (Score:4, Insightful)

      by geekmux (1040042) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:00AM (#35990660)

      Better would be some kind of detailed explanation of how the hell this could have happened in the first place, and what they have done to make sure it won't happen again...

      The Truth: "We got hacked."

      Care to tell me why you have such an apparent appreciation for PR bullshit? You're certainly not going to get the truth, especially from a public company..

    • Re:Better (Score:5, Insightful)

      by milkmage (795746) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:54AM (#35990988)

      watch the video of the press conference.
      this was a KNOWN vulnerability see @about 1:15 http://youtu.be/LeNR_HHhIGI [youtu.be]

      epic failure.
      how do you prevent it? how about patch your shit.

  • by chemindefer (707238) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @10:44AM (#35990574)
    Will be paid for by a random credit card number.
  • Blog comments (Score:4, Interesting)

    by hipp5 (1635263) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @10:47AM (#35990592)
    Does anyone else have a hard time believing the majority of the comments on the blog post are real? They're all along the lines of, "Hallelujah, Sony is wonderful for getting the service back up!!!!!!!" Or are people so desperate to go back to playing CoD multiplayer that they're willing to take any sandpaper-wrapped anal raping that Sony will give them?
    • Re:Blog comments (Score:5, Insightful)

      by koolfy (1213316) <koolfyNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Sunday May 01, 2011 @10:58AM (#35990652) Homepage Journal
      Never underestimate the stupidity of fanboys in great number.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        Never underestimate a PR agent with multi-user access.

    • What do you expect? It's all the Sony Kool-Aid drinkers.
    • Re:Blog comments (Score:4, Informative)

      by Lehk228 (705449) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:05AM (#35990696) Journal
      any comments to the contrary get deleted and banned.

      it's a lot like free republic but with more teabagging
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Very true, and they've been disabling some accounts. Mine is blocked now. I was critical, not rude at all, now I cannot log on.

        • You can't log on because the PSN is still down and the blog uses a PSN account. Once the PSN login server is brought back online, you'll know if you really were disabled, but right now nobody can log on unless they still had a valid cookie.

      • it's a lot like free republic but with more teabagging

        Maybe you're from someplace other than the states then...?

    • Re:Blog comments (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:17AM (#35990776)

      It is interesting, as all "normal" PSN logins used for commenting on that blog expired last week. The cooking keeping them "logged in" to the blog had a 1 week expiration. I guess that only leaves Sony employees to be able to actually log in and comment.

    • are people so desperate to go back to playing CoD multiplayer that they're willing to take any sandpaper-wrapped anal raping that Sony will give them?

      Yes, there are such people in the world. Did you even have to ask?

    • by Tihstae (86842)

      You need to login to the Playstation Network to post. Besides Sony employees, tell me who can login to the Playstation Network.

      Note: First sentence may not be totally accurate.

    • If "we" had the time and resources, someone could do a stealth op and determine if those user names existed before yesterday. However, don't discount the other alternative, "threatened censorship". In that case the only comments that would make it through are the ones you see.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      They can't possibly be real. You have to login to the playstation network to comment on Sony's press release post. Can you guess what's impossible to do right now?

    • I don't have a hard time believing they're real. If you look outside of the group of individuals who post on slashdot, Sony has quite a large number of relatively happy customers who want to use the ps3 they bought (or that their parents bought for them). I'm not trying to say anything for or against Sony here, but why in the world would someone who paid a large sum of money for a ps3 not want to be able to use one of the most important features?
      • by tepples (727027)

        why in the world would someone who paid a large sum of money for a ps3 not want to be able to use one of the most important features?

        Which is exactly why the PS3 was hacked in the first place: to restore the Other OS feature to people who paid for it.

        • by tao (10867)
          You know, much as I begrudge Sony for the removal of Other OS, it would be a gross misrepresentation of reality to call Other OS "one of the most important features" (at least without qualifying it with "for a small minority").
    • Re:Blog comments (Score:5, Informative)

      by SailorSpork (1080153) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:11PM (#35991062) Homepage
      OF COURSE they are fake. Try to log in and post for yourself. You try and it says "Sign in here with your PlayStation®Network ID to interact with the community and participate in the conversations." I tried and got a note saying "Site Maintenance Notice. The server is currently down for maintenance." It's the same system tied to the PSN servers that are out. Meaning these comments are being crafted by their PR and Marketing departments, as well as (possibly) other normal Sony employees and developers.
    • Well it's kinda like how there are people who will equate wanting to play games online with getting raped.

      Takes all kinds of jackasses to make up a world, son.

    • The core player will stick with the best platform, no matter what... I imagine it is hard to derail them until some worthy competitor to "PlayStation" arises, but given the state of things (Xbox aside), this is very unlikely.
    • Re:Blog comments (Score:4, Insightful)

      by westlake (615356) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @01:25PM (#35991588)

      Does anyone else have a hard time believing the majority of the comments on the blog post are real? They're all along the lines of, "Hallelujah, Sony is wonderful for getting the service back up!!!!!!!

      When a system is brought down, people blame the mischief and malice of the hacker and the culture they believe supports and sustains him.

      Whenever the geek summons the masses to the barricades he will far more often than not find them aligned with the other side.

      There are 70 million PSN accounts.

      What would that make it? 35 times the size of Slashdot?

    • by Quirkz (1206400)
      Well, I for one will be happy to get Netflix streaming back. That's been offline since PSN went down. I'm not so much "hallelujah Sony" as "about frakking time," though.
  • Token offering (Score:3, Interesting)

    by grilled-cheese (889107) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:00AM (#35990662)
    I'm not going to go back to the PSN until Sony gives me a year of credit monitoring and the ability to sue them (not that I would, but thank you SCOTUS).
    • by Khyber (864651)

      A class-action of the people against SCOTUS would be interesting, as a challenge of the constitutionality of the ruling.

      Of course, that would mean another court would have to be established - perhaps one actually comprised of the people, one that works for the people.

      Yea, that's a pipe dream.

      • by DarkOx (621550)

        So this court upon which you will conferring the power to review the Supreme Court is going to be directly elected and fairly frequently I take it?

        Want to guess what happens to judicial precedent when frustrated voters who don't know anything other than they are frustrated toss out one party and vote in the other each election cycle? Can we at least make the terms like five years or something so we can just know that for even numbered decades abortion and weed are legal, the second and tenth amendments are

        • Re:Token offering (Score:5, Informative)

          by Stormy Dragon (800799) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:27PM (#35991158) Homepage

          Oh please, both parties ride the drug war hobby horse, and both parties love restricting the first ammendment.

          • by lennier (44736)

            Oh please, both parties ride the drug war hobby horse, and both parties love restricting the first ammendment.

            So... if both major political parties are in favour of a certain position, and they're doing it to win votes... that would suggest that that political position is, in fact, strongly endorsed by the majority of voters.

            In other words, democracy is working precisely as designed, delivering laws that the majority of citizens want... but you think this is broken because it doesn't give you the laws that you, a minority, want. But you think that because you're a special snowflake, your will should override everyo

            • Just because something is popular doesn't make it right. There have been all manner of attrocities that were approved of by the majorty of society at the time.

      • that would mean another court would have to be established - perhaps one actually comprised of the people, one that works for the people.

        Such a court exists in theory; it's called the ballot box. Three-fourths of state legislatures can call conventions and propose and ratify an amendment to the U.S. Constitution. However, due to MPAA-owned news networks' influence on public perception of candidates in debates, especially at the primary level, elections are just as corrupt as every other branch of government.

      • by Araxen (561411)

        There was a lawsuit filed against Sony just last week.

        http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2384523,00.asp [pcmag.com]

        We'll see how the SCOTUS ruling comes into play here no doubt.

    • Re:Token offering (Score:4, Interesting)

      by nobodyman (90587) * on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:16AM (#35990774) Homepage

      Agreed - they totally screwed over their entire user base and as a consolation prize they are offering more of the same. In fact, I bet that acceptance of this "Complimentary Offering" is contingent upon agreeing to not sue Sony or take part in any class-action lawsuit.

  • by TerminaMorte (729622) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:25AM (#35990818) Homepage
    You can download some games for free, but you must remain a PSN+ member to keep playing those games. So in reality they're offering you a free month of a service they expect you to keep paying for. Would be much more impressed with a year of free PSN+
    • you must remain a PSN+ member to keep playing those games.

      Which differs from the business model of Netflix in exactly what way?

      • None, which is my point. As a gesture of good-will it isn't much. Would you accept a free month of netflix if they had gotten all their customers CC info stolen? Probably not, since it's next to worthless.
  • by Tihstae (86842) <Tihstae@gmail.com> on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:26AM (#35990826) Homepage

    From the Blog Post: "The company is also creating the position of Chief Information Security Officer"

    Translation: During this difficult time, we have discovered that we have no security on our network and no one to blame for this. We will now have someone to blame and publicly humiliate when (not if) this happens again.

  • by Opportunist (166417) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:27AM (#35990832)

    Hand the plebs a few trinkets and beads and hope they forget quickly how we compromised their privacy and opened the huge can of worms for them.

    Gee, Sony, a bit more innovation! Especially since this can is heaps bigger than the last one!

    • Heh I called it (as one of many) in a post in the other thread a few days back. Now we're just waiting for Sony's total immunity from the lawsuit.

      Geohot unlocks the hardware code? "Destroy his credibility!".
      Sony leaves open millions of credit cards? "Have a free month of service!"

  • Wakeup call US? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by mrcvp (1130257) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @11:29AM (#35990842)
    When is the US consumer ever going to learn that the credit card is one of the worst inventions ever! Of course it's Sony's fault but you are using a broken system. Make direct online banking the standard, not some insanely insecure card or some horrible third-party service like paypal. Here in The Netherlands we Have iDeal [ideal.nl] We need to get to such a system on a global scale. The tech is there and it's more secure, so what the hell are they waiting for.
    • iDeal is a third party system. It's run by a corporation called Currence b.v. And it's the same one factor security used by every other system.

      Now there is some advantage in that the authentication is done by the bank rather than the retailer, so the information is only in one place, but the bank can still be hacked. It also seems it would be vulnerable to man in the middle attacks.

      What we really need is some sort of two factor security. One thing that happened to me recently was a system Verizon used w

    • Re:Wakeup call US? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by tepples (727027) <tepples@nOSpAM.gmail.com> on Sunday May 01, 2011 @01:01PM (#35991382) Homepage Journal

      Make direct online banking the standard

      And do what for payments in person?

      Here in The Netherlands we Have iDeal

      How is the iDEAL payment flow noticeably different from that of PayPal, which you call "horrible", other than that iDEAL is branded by the bank and not eBay?

    • by cpct0 (558171)

      Mmm, well, there is the PCI standard that's supposed to protect you against such things, disallowing ANY kind of credit card number keeping. I guess Sony weren't PCI compliant, and I guess this is why they are being checked by all these groups, because such thing should've never happened, at least for the CC#. I know, I had to go through that test last year, and it's quite secure.

      For the account info, that's something else, they screwed up and that's it. Let me guess, their passwords were sent through a SHA

  • The only card I used with PSN was one that is now expired and from a closed account.

    This incident, however, ensures I use PSN points cards for any future PSN purchases.
    • by xero314 (722674)

      Please hash the passwords next time.

      Have you seen any reputable resource verifying that the passwords were not hashed?

      Beyond that, hashing the passwords means very little. When you have 70 million passwords and the right software and password tables, you will be able to determine a very large portion of those passwords in a very short period of time. Hashing merely keeps the honest person honest, it does not secure the password.

  • So...um...to get the "free" Playstation Plus and "Complimentary Offering", would I have to give them my credit card number?
  • by Vectormatic (1759674) on Sunday May 01, 2011 @12:07PM (#35991048)

    I dont own a PS3, but my psp is unable to log into the PSN facilities too, which sort of annoyes me (or in case of the PGP-GO owners, completely blocks them from buying new games at all)

    I wonder if us PSP owners will also recieve some compensation for the loss of service, and worse, the leaking of our private information

    • by _xeno_ (155264)

      I can't see why not. I'm sure you'll get the same free PS3 downloadable game that every other PSN user will get.

  • The PSN+ month free offer is worst than a them offering customers a gift card. It comes as absolutely no loss to Sony offering this because it's just a way to ensure and wrap more people into their revenue stream. I liken the move to something more of a casino comp in that they'll lure you in with a shitty buffet so you can piss away more of your money on some false hope.
    I'll pass on their token gesture, scripted apology, and boneheaded-ness of connecting with the customer.
  • What I hated about PSN from the start is that they demand we enter a credit card number just to be able to use the service. I really see no need for any site outside of financial institutions to need to store credit card information - in my opinion this practice should be made illegal. My bank has recently started offering the facility (through Visa) of generating one time card numbers with fixed limit caps - and you can choose your own expiry date. If Sony are still insisting on card numbers - they will be

    • by Xtifr (1323)

      What I hated about PSN from the start is that they demand we enter a credit card number just to be able to use the service.

      When on earth was that!? I bought my PS3 many years ago (and yes, OtherOS was very much a factor in my decision to purchase one), and signed up to PSN almost immediately, and I've never seen a request for CC info. If they did actually require CC for PSN, it must have been for a very brief period right after the PS3 came out.

      Were you maybe thinking of XboxLive? Or have I just been successfully trolled?

      • by jools33 (252092)

        I'm not trolling - just I recall giving my card no grudgingly when I signed up - maybe it was just with the first purchase from the store (my memory is a little clouded - it was a long time ago) - but I still fail to see why the playstation store needs to record the card numbers at all. Its just placing credit card information at risk for no need except for more control by Sony.

    • Companies often use credit card info as a way to validate that you're in a particular country, for the purpose of region locking etc. Apple does the same on iTunes Store, for example.

  • Please assume the party escort submission position

I find you lack of faith in the forth dithturbing. - Darse ("Darth") Vader

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