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The Humble Indie Bundle 3 Released 158

Posted by Soulskill
from the everybody-wins dept.
JimWise writes "The fourth Humble Bundle has been released (the third to be released was the Humble Frozenbyte Bundle). Included in this bundle are: Crayon Physics Deluxe by Klooniegames; Cogs by Lazy 8 Studios; VVVVVV by Terry Cavanagh; Hammerfight by Kranx Productions; and And Yet It Moves by Broken Rules. Each of the games in the bundle is DRM free and available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, as well as available through Steam. As with the other Humble Bundles, you pay what you want and customize how much goes towards the developers, EFF, Child's Play, and the Humble Tip."
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The Humble Indie Bundle 3 Released

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  • Note, the Humble Tip goes to Humble Bundle, Inc. itself, which pays for the bandwidth and development of this promotion. You determine how much we deserve to earn or lose from your purchase.

    Anyone have an idea of how much this would amount to per person out of curiosity?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      to who?
      you mean to the giant financial institution sequioa capital who own the bundle:
      http://finance.fortune.cnn.com/2011/04/22/sequoia-capital-backs-online-gaming-bundler/

      Or the cutey smiley friendly faces of the indie devs (yet to finish their first game) who cynically act as frontmen for this big venture capital vehicle?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Shame on the eevil corporation, for financing an operation that provides a fair and useful service! Shame on all the eevil corporations that provide everything you use, every day.

    • by F.Ultra (1673484)
      You see the value in the slider when you enter what you want to pay. If you're asking for the average tip they get then that is not available, and one cannot calculate it either since every one can change the slider and give them more or less.
  • by RyanFenton (230700) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @09:00PM (#36890166)

    Aside from helping a very well-implemented charity organization (Child's play + Developers + EFF + HumbleBundleTeam sliders are a real nice touch), VVVVVV is a really nice game.

    If nothing else, the music is priceless, really catchy stuff. That, and the constant abstractions of the pixel-art, mixed with the mixed humor of the name of each "screen" you appear in make it an instant classic.

    Of course, the insane challenge of "Doing things the Hard Way" will also make it a memorable experience.

    Highly recommended for that one alone.

    Ryan Fenton

    • by Lazareth (1756336)

      Seconded. If nothing else get the humble bundle for VVVVVV. Excellent game, really screws with your mind.

      Unfortunately I already, again, own 4 out of 5 of those games in the humble bundle. Was the same situation last time.

      • You could always just pay what you think the other game is worth or gift the games you have to someone else.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by EdIII (1114411)

          gift the games you have to someone else.

          I thought that could not happen unless you had the permission from the game developer and paid them twice? Wasn't that made illegal or some shit? Punishment comparable to Schedule 1 narcotics possession?

          I also saw a study funded by the game publishers proving it was no different than kicking a puppy... hard.

          • You should do standup.

            • by EdIII (1114411)

              Well such a comment coming from Dr. Peter Venkman I take quite graciously.

              Not everyday I get an endorsement from such a well respected parapsychologist.

              You are the doctor involved in the infamous Stay Puft incident in New York some 25 years ago?

    • by Kelbear (870538)

      I LOVE Hammer Fight. I played through that campaign 3 times.

      The combat is physics based. You pilot a ship with swords, axes, hammers, morningstars, guns, cannons, etc. hanging off your ship, and you control the ship with the mouse. By swinging the mouse (and thereby the ship), you can slam/slash/aim your weapons into enemies, with increased damage the harder the contact is. The game does an absolutely incredible job of making the hits felt. Seeing an enemy hurtle towards you with his whirling blades, and th

      • by artor3 (1344997)

        Well, I was going to give this bundle a pass since I already own all but Hammerflight, but that sounds irresistibly awesome.

        I also want to plug Crayon Physics as well worth playing to anyone who hasn't tried it. It starts pretty simple -- you can solve most of the early levels by drawing a catapult. But later on, you are driven to draw all sorts of creative things to solve the puzzles. I had some maps where I created a series of elevators and conveyer belts, all hand drawn, to get to the goal.

    • by JimWise (1804930)

      I was a bit disappointed that no soundtracks were included for any of the corresponding games this time around. I have not had a chance to install the games yet, but reading your post already makes me look forward to hearing the music and also sad that I won't have a simple soundtrack set to play in the car. Maybe we can ask the Humble Bundle crew if they can release some of the soundtracks once X copies are sold or X dollars are raised. They have done similar things in the past.

    • VVVVVV also just got a big update, with a new engine written in C++ rather than flash. This means no more blowing away your saves every time your flash cache gets emptied. Other updates are a level editor, some extra levels, a new "analog" video mode, and possible Steamworks integration in the near future. Still waiting for the update to get pushed to Steam, though.
    • by Applekid (993327)

      Even better, VVVVVV was rewritten in C++ instead of Flash/Actionscript, so it now performs amazingly well on slower hardware than before AND now has a level editor. I hope the lesson was well learned. :)

      Writing the game engine twice... talk about "Doing Things the Hard Way".

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Average purchase: $4.43
    Average Windows: $3.65
    Average Mac: $5.59
    Average Linux: $10.39

    yay us!

    • by Pete Venkman (1659965) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @09:13PM (#36890226) Journal

      No it just means that one of you paid $10.38 and the other paid $10.40.

      • by lgftsa (617184) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @09:44PM (#36890368)

        I paid US$30 (AU$28.xx), twice as much as I paid for HB2 as I intend to play all of these games - the FPS in HB2 don't interest me.

        BTW, Crayon Physics fails on Debian Squeeze. My fix was to move the bundled lib32 directory to lib32.o and apt-get the standard system packages for the few libraries it then complains are missing, which are mostly SDL related. All that was left was an incompatible system libstdc++, so I re-created lib32 and copied the old version from lib32.o back. So far, it runs fine and is great fun.

        • by ediron2 (246908) *

          ... thus 'The Year of Linux on the Desktop' takes another kick to the 'nads.

          (Having snarked, thanks for the good debian advice; that's my OS of choice)

        • by Narishma (822073)

          I don't remember there being an FPS in any previous HIB.

        • by Syberz (1170343)

          My fix was to move the bundled lib32 directory to lib32.o and apt-get the standard system packages for the few libraries it then complains are missing, which are mostly SDL related. All that was left was an incompatible system libstdc++, so I re-created lib32 and copied the old version from lib32.o back.

          And Linux users wonder why their OS isn't more popular...

      • by Anonymous Coward

        So, using your figures, you're saying the five Windows users who bought the game paid less than the two Linux users and the same as the two Mac users?

        Wow. I didn't realise Windows users were such a pack of cheap cunts.

        • To be fair, they may have spent a good deal more money on windows than they thought they would...

        • Its called an over-served market, that is Windows gaming.

          Does it not make logical sense that an over-served market with millions of mediocre games would pay less dollars? As opposed to under-served markets whose only choices are either, just a few natively developed games, or games known to work with the assistance of wine.

          Is that not the basic gist of supply and demand? There is an over supply of Windows "PC" games, the over-served market can only afford to buy some of the entertainment available to them

          • by Anonymous Coward

            This is certainly true, but don't discount the effect of the warez culture on Windows, too.

          • by wildstoo (835450)

            I'd say more like 30 new Windows games a month. The rest are (*spit*) DLC.

            That's still a lot of games. A lot more than Mac or Linux.

          • by Applekid (993327)

            Its called an over-served market, that is Windows gaming.

            Does it not make logical sense that an over-served market with millions of mediocre games would pay less dollars? As opposed to under-served markets whose only choices are either, just a few natively developed games, or games known to work with the assistance of wine.

            Is that not the basic gist of supply and demand? There is an over supply of Windows "PC" games, the over-served market can only afford to buy some of the entertainment available to them. There must be something like a hundred new games on Steam, available for Windows only, every month. On the other hand, you have an under-served market of highly technical users who likely make a professional living from their primary OS of choice (Mac or Linux). The demand in that particular corner of the under-served market is greater than the supply of quality entertainment.

            Doesn't really explain why Average Mac isn't closer to the top. Considering the price premium on Apple hardware, I'm not convinced they couldn't dig deeper in their pockets.

            As far as Linux being on top, it's amazing how much money you save living in your mom's basement. (lol, I kid I kid.... it's because they are in a better position to appreciate the complexity of quality software, while other user segments treat software as a commodity)

            • I think thats the crux of it. As a Linux IT professional, I spend a great deal of time writing complex software. A lot of the Mac crowd I personally know are either in the same Sysadmin specialization as myself, or are proficient in graphic design and web development. Either way, that type of user is a completely different demographic than the casual Windows user who likely has no interest in software, or the system itself.

              As far as digital entertainment goes, I'd say the average Mac user is better serve

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      Linux users are starved for quality games, and thus heap praise (and money) upon anyone who develops for their platform. Same for Mac users, but to a lesser extent ever since Valve started releasing games for them. Windows users are spoiled by having every game of the past twenty years developed for their platform.

      Or maybe Jonathan Blow, Markus Persson, and whoever "ExpiredPopsicle" is all reported themselves as Linux users and pulled up the average.

      • by tuppe666 (904118)

        Linux users are starved for quality games, and thus heap praise (and money) upon anyone who develops for their platform. Same for Mac users, but to a lesser extent ever since Valve started releasing games for them. Windows users are spoiled by having every game of the past twenty years developed for their platform.

        Or maybe Jonathan Blow, Markus Persson, and whoever "ExpiredPopsicle" is all reported themselves as Linux users and pulled up the average.

        With the rise of cross platform gaming Linux is the winner...buying the indie bundles alone gives you 20+ gaming titles. The strange thing is supply and demand, at least on its own is not, does not work well in a "pay what you want" selling method. Linux uses like DRM free/Indie games for charity those are three more reasons to buy the games :)

      • Or maybe Jonathan Blow, Markus Persson, and whoever "ExpiredPopsicle" is all reported themselves as Linux users and pulled up the average.

        Markus Persson (Notch) has generally struck me as a linux guy, but I have no proof. He chose Xperia Play (Android) over IOS for mobile development, so I don't think he's a mac guy. He's always had linux on the download page, and he picked Java for development.

        He _did_ sign a contract with Microsoft to develop a version for the 360. I think he just recognized it as a better community than the PSN community.

        • by pcolaman (1208838)

          Most of the screen shots I've seen of Notch programming show him with some sort of Macbook.

        • by KDR_11k (778916)

          The Xperia Play has buttons, I think that's the main deciding factor. Playing Minecraft with all the buttons overlaid on the main view won't be fun.

    • I'm apparently not alone in having to at least tweak the games a little to make them work. Right now, AYIM doesn't fucking work, [andyetitmoves.net] and the Humble Indie Bundle version doesn't even generate any logs from that.

      From another post, it seems only one of the games "just worked" with Linux. By contrast, the original Humble Bundle had all games just work on Linux, out of the box, with no issues.

      I'm using Kubuntu 11.04. Not exactly an obscure distro. Others are reporting the same problem with Ubuntu 11.04, and that it

  • by Anonymous Coward

    These stats are funny as the "free" OS people are willing to pay more, or so it appears (Or are desperate for games) :)

    Total payments: $303,911.06
    Purchases #: 68,495
    Average purchase: $4.44
    Average Windows: $3.66
    Average Mac: $5.61
    Average Linux: $10.40

    • free as in freedom, not necessarily free as in free beer. ;-)

    • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @10:18PM (#36890546)

      When your operating system is free, it leaves with you copious spare funds to spend on games or yachts.

    • by Cereal Box (4286)

      Hate to say it, but yeah, they're desperate for games. The Linux guys buying the bundle are trying to make a statement with their purchase prices, whereas the Windows and Mac guys are really just paying what they think the games are worth, which is honestly just a couple bucks.

      • whereas the Windows and Mac guys are really just paying what they think the games are worth, which is honestly just a couple bucks.

        Sorry, but no. Given the choice, they're cheap bastards. VVVVV is easily worth $5 on its own. The average Windows purchase price is $3.66. And Yet It Moves is easily worth $5 on its own. The average Windows purchase price is $3.66. Cogs is easily worth $5. The average Wind...well, you get the picture. I bought one bundle for more than the Linux average for my brother and bought another for myself. I paid less the second time round (but still more than the Windows average) as I've already bought all but one

        • by m2vq (2417438)

          Maybe most self-identifying windows users can't afford good games, or maybe they really are so ignorant that they think anything that isn't shat out onto a conveyor by EA once a year isn't worth more than they'd spend on a Big Mac. Who knows...

          Or what about if you let people themselves judge what is a good game and what is not. Besides, most of these games have been available on Windows for a long time. I owned all of them but Hammerfight and paid the full price for them. I honestly haven't really played those games that much. I did still throw a few dollars to this Humble Bundle because I think it's for a good cause. Does that make me a cheap bastard?

          • by Tomato42 (2416694)

            Or what about if you let people themselves judge what is a good game and what is not.

            Fair point, but it's hard to judge a game you haven't actually played yet...

        • Nice to see that you think your definition of "value" and "worth" need to be applied to everyone with no modifiers at all - thats a unique kind of arrogance.

        • by tlhIngan (30335)

          Sorry, but no. Given the choice, they're cheap bastards. VVVVV is easily worth $5 on its own. The average Windows purchase price is $3.66. And Yet It Moves is easily worth $5 on its own. The average Windows purchase price is $3.66. Cogs is easily worth $5. The average Wind...well, you get the picture. I bought one bundle for more than the Linux average for my brother and bought another for myself. I paid less the second time round (but still more than the Windows average) as I've already bought all but one

      • by tuppe666 (904118)

        Hate to say it, but yeah, they're desperate for games. The Linux guys buying the bundle are trying to make a statement with their purchase prices, whereas the Windows and Mac guys are really just paying what they think the games are worth, which is honestly just a couple bucks.

        You don't hate to say it, and its not true. Its somewhat ironic that just buying the indie bundles alone will have given you 20+ games. Linux is increasingly getting more and more love from game developers with cross platform gaming being where its at. Whats interesting is the games that are available for Linux are the quality indie games, Those heavily DRMed console ports done by the major game companies. I suspect those are best played on a console anyway, although to be fair those interest me less and le

    • by VGPowerlord (621254) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @10:56PM (#36890736) Homepage

      Amazingly, the purchase prices directly correlate to the number of those games that were previously available for that OS.

      5 of these games were available for Windows prior to this bundle: And Yet it Moves, VVVVVV, Cogs, Crayon Physics Deluxe, and Hammerfight.

      3 of these games were available for Macs prior to this bundle: And Yet it Moves, VVVVVV, and Cogs.

      1 of these games was available for Linux prior to this bundle: And Yet it Moves.

    • by jeek (37349)

      Between 184 and 7789 Linux users purchased this.. http://goo.gl/imBYi [goo.gl] (link to wolframalpha)

      I don't know how to use the site well enough to get around the fact that it returned no answers when I added the (l+m+w)*4.44=303911.06 constraint

  • I immediately began the purchase, but I've been sitting at the "waiting for paypal" screen for a while now. Last bundle it only lasted a few seconds, but then again, I waited a couple days before I grabbed that one.
    • Check your email while that paypal thing is going round and round and round and round, just like a game console loading icon.

      In mine and my friends cases, the purchase had already happened. You can close that popup screen.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It's 2011!

    • bitcoin will only be supported in 2025

      in fact i would bet that Linden Dollars will be supported before bitcoin will

  • I've purchased bundle 1 and 2, but 2 said up front most of the games wouldn't work with on-board video cards. Off hand, I couldn't find anything about this on this bundle. Anyone know if these games will work on intel on-board video cards?

    I bought 2 anyway, just to support them. But it would be nice if they worked on all my machines.

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      I can't speak for all of them, but V^6 and AYIM should both work.

    • by tuppe666 (904118)

      All games worked with the intel on-board cards for indie bundles 1&2, at least on Linux. The Humble Frozenbyte Bundle was a different matter. What was interesting with that bundle is features were fixed intel driver, and problems regarding patents and OpenGL were raised.

      • Yes, I thought Frozenbyte was #2. I guess I have purchased all of them to date.

        -=-=-=-=

        General questions about the Humble Frozenbyte Bundle Very important notes

        The games may NOT run on Intel integrated graphics solutions (on Windows/Mac/Linux - there are some exceptions thanks to recent driver work and new hardware. Generally, the latest hardware (i3/i5/i7 CPUs and their integrated graphics chips) are ok, old hardware is most likely not. The 2011 MacBook Pro 13" models will run the games.

        Mac versions of the

    • by kalirion (728907)

      Don't have Hammer Fight, but the rest work quite well on my laptop's Intel 4500 mhd. Running Cogs at minimum settings at 640x480 for smoothest experience though.

  • I've made two payments(2@$1 ea) but I haven't received a download link yet, just paypal confirmation/receipt. Has anyone else had trouble?
    • by stonedcat (80201)

      There's a box in the bottom right corner of the HIB page for live support.
      Failing that you should be able to email them and say you've not yet received your link.
      Perhaps there was a problem or delay processing your payment? Did you read the paypal emails?

      • I idled in the chat box for a while, the paypal emails said it was all good to go, but like i just posted below, I used another vendor and it's all good. $2 more than I wanted to spend but I can't complain. I'm doing my best to bring the amount linux folk spent on the bundle to the windows level.
      • by godrik (1287354)

        I processed mine through paypal and got the link to download about an hour later.

    • ah like the above post, I ended up just making a third $1 payment through another vendor
  • How typical, Windows users are bringing down the average.
    • hurr durr

    • by MacTO (1161105)

      Maybe Windows and Linux users are buying it for different reasons? Linux users may be trying to support game development on their platform. At least one Windows user (myself) is just trying out a bunch of indie games, and since I find indie games are hit and miss I don't want to dump too much money into it.

      (Also, as several people have noted, they already owned several of the games. Since the video suggests that some of these games are new to Linux, Linux users may be willing to pay more because they are

  • VVVVVV was definitely worth buying this bundle in my opinion. Awesome game.
  • As someone who already owned both, these two games alone are worth at least $10. Don't be stingy.
    • by hedwards (940851)

      Stingy is relative, I'd love to have the disposable income to be able to afford $10, I don't so I gave what I could. The alternative would be me not paying anything at all, so in the light I think it's better to give what you can.

      Just don't be a dick, give at least enough to cover the cost of the transaction.

  • Even though I've barely played many of the games in the last couple and I don't even know if the games this time are PPC compatible.

    By the way, I am currently offering a good home to any wayward or orphaned Intel Macs. You will receive no actual money but you will know that your machine is in the hands of people who love it dearly and will not sell its internal parts for scrap.

  • After you buy, you have the option of "liking" or "tweeting" or "+1-ing" the Humble Bundle, with some interesting stats on who has done so currently...

    Twitter has 14,900 tweets

    Facebook has 115,000 Likes

    Google+ has 1,200 +1's

    Very interesting indeed.

    • I just moved to Google+ and +1'd it, but it was already ' Facebook liked' from when I'd done so for the first and second humble bundles. HB3 has only just come out and it doesn't tell you how many people just 'liked' HB3 on its own, so seeing as though Google+ wasn't around previously, I don't think we can read too much into these figures
  • I don't mind paying money for games but the big studio's retail $50/game is a bit much unless it's a really good thing. I do pay for second hand titles if it's under $20. Given you get 5 games I usually end up forking $50 or more for these bundles.

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