Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Chrome Chromium Google Graphics Games

Google Is Grooming Chrome As a Game Platform 127

Posted by timothy
from the ok-you'll-need-these-special-dice dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this snippet from Conceivably Tech: "On Friday I noticed that Google is heavily pushing New Game, a game developer conference that is focused on HTML5-based gaming content — and, of course, content that runs in web browsers. The fact that such an event already exists and that there is game content being developed in HTML5, is quite stunning by itself. However, Google also noted that a sandboxed native client (NaCl) with 3D (in addition to 2D) will be available in Chrome soon, which will allow the browser to connect to traditional C and C++ code via its integrated Pepper API."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Google Is Grooming Chrome As a Game Platform

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday August 28, 2011 @04:01PM (#37235896)

    I know Commander Taco used to like games, and now he's not alive to see this. Very sad.

  • So is Chrome Google's current attempt to finally cut Java out of their web application strategy?
  • Does anyone (Score:4, Insightful)

    by phantomfive (622387) on Sunday August 28, 2011 @04:09PM (#37235944) Journal
    Does anyone else see this as a giant security hole? As in, various schemes like this have been tried since the days of ActiveX, and the only reason ActiveX has the worst reputation is because it's the only one that gained widespread use?
    • Yes. But, if they go for the locked ecosystem that seem to become so popular these days, they can try and solve the problem at the source.

      • by fidget42 (538823)

        Yes. But, if they go for the locked ecosystem that seem to become so popular these days, they can try and solve the problem at the source.

        But Google is open. Why would they go from an open playing field to a locked down, curated, one?

        • How is Google open? They are very public about things, beta this alpha that but much of Googles software is closed.

          • by fidget42 (538823)

            How is Google open? They are very public about things, beta this alpha that but much of Googles software is closed.

            You must not read any of their comments about Android.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Goaway (82658)

      I'm sure there are other people who also have not made the tiniest effort to read up on the security mechanisms of NaCl, and think the same as you.

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        what fun are apps that can't talk to each other?

        but with chrome os, you wouldn't need this, all the potential security stuff is right in the javascript apis, just get the user to agree for you to read his mail box and you'll know exactly how to do it and how to tell his phone to call to your pay-line - with easy api's.

        but this NaCl will be used for two things, to gain execution speed and to make things harder to reverse engineer. oh and third, to port stuff, chrome os needs nes emulators too.

    • by blair1q (305137)

      Depends on what "sandbox" means to them.

      If the API has no provision for generalized system calls or other i/o, and only allows i/o to its interface, then it should be no problem.

      Or at least no more of a problem than the giant pile of un-verified code you're using to read this message and the vast number of invisible bytes it may or may not contain between its lines.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Every time NaCl comes up someone says "But... but... ActiveX!!!". Perhaps next time you could preface your comment with "I no nothing about the subject matter, but...."

    • by juancn (596002)
      ActiveX is fundamentally different than NaCl. ActiveX security was based on the component being signed and that's about it. NaCl uses a very strict code verification (similar to what the JVM does, but with a subset of x86), runs in a process that has no permissions to do anyhting, and can only use a few APIs. It's not worse than Javascript.
    • by CTachyon (412849)

      Does anyone else see this as a giant security hole? As in, various schemes like this have been tried since the days of ActiveX, and the only reason ActiveX has the worst reputation is because it's the only one that gained widespread use?

      The point of NaCl is that it's a virtual machine bytecode language, and you can statically verify (without running the code) that the bytecode conforms to the spec. However, for performance reasons, the bytecode language and the virtual machine architecture just happen to line up with the native machine code and native architecture. NaCl provides only a subset of the full instruction set, though, and this prevents arbitrary pointer arithmetic or self-modifying code that could break outside the sandbox. N

    • by cgenman (325138)

      ActiveX has the worst reputation because it was a fundamentally insecure architecture that also happened to be poorly written. And despite being a default installation on a default browser of the default operating system for over a decade now, the only place I can think where it is actively in use is Microsoft's own websites.

      Remember, ActiveX was attempting to compete with Flash and Java. At that it failed miserably.

      • Rumor is that ActiveX caught on in Korea on very many websites. Not speaking Korean, I cannot personally verify this.
    • by nikanth (1066242)
      IIUC ActiveX required permissions and got access to everything. But NaCl is more like JVM, but runs directly in hardware.
    • "Does anyone else see this as a giant security hole? As in, various schemes like this have been tried since the days of ActiveX, and the only reason ActiveX has the worst reputation is because it's the only one that gained widespread use?
      "

      I couldn't agree with you more. IE 5 and IE 6 are the staple of proper security and good coding practices. Nevermind it let any ActiveX applet run automatically with full administrator access by simply browsing a page. I am sure its those evil hackers just targeting what e

  • Proprietary (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Billly Gates (198444)

    How is using Pepper different than ActiveX with Internet Explorer?

    If you use pure html 5 with WebGL or Canvas 3D (for IE 9 or IE 10) you can create 3D games using the hosts GPU. Chrome's 3D and hardware acceleration for html 5 does lag considerable behind Firefox and IE 9/10. I wonder if it is because they want you to use Pepper instead?

    Either way their actions go agaisn't the spirit of HTML 5. You can do all of that properly in the latest versions of the browsers that is cross platform.

    • by Seferino (837142)

      How is using Pepper different than ActiveX with Internet Explorer?

      One word: sandbox [google.com].

    • by PCM2 (4486)

      How is using Pepper different than ActiveX with Internet Explorer?

      In at least one significant way: The Native Client code is all open source, [chromium.org] like Chromium itself.

      • Com/DCOM in activex are highly documented with source code available over MSDN. Sure it is not GNU, but it is still proprietary when other open standards exist like HTML 5

  • by mingot (665080)

    I would love to hear the howling if it was microsoft introducing this sandboxed native client.

  • Salty Sand (Score:5, Funny)

    by FrankDrebin (238464) on Sunday August 28, 2011 @04:15PM (#37235984) Homepage

    sandboxed native client (NaCl)

    In other words, a saltbox.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      ya so it kills all the snails

    • by blair1q (305137)

      NaCl...Pepper...get it?

      They should've called the API "Lime," but maybe that's just me (and about 10,000 hot chicks in bikinis at spring break...)

    • by lanthar (962279)

      Should have gone with SiO2

  • Actually this is kind of exciting for if it seriously takes off, that means one can do some gaming in a linux platform. Especially if it's a pay to play thingy which I would imagine that is where they are going with a browser based game. Or free to play but be plagued with ads, or its a pay to win situation. That means the whiny Mac people could play as well. Face it, games is what is keeping Windows around. At least in my opinion.

    • And legacy applications, and Excel macros.

      • And SQL Server, and Visual Studio, and a bzillion different vertical apps put out by ISVs.

        You hinted at that with "legacy applications" but the fact is that very little of the installed base of Windows applications counts as "legacy." Most are being actively developed.

    • Actually this is kind of exciting for if it seriously takes off, that means one can do some gaming in a linux platform.

      I've been playing games using only GNU/Linux for many years and the main problem was lack of time to try them all, especially since the Humble Indie Bundle. Let alone all those games for Android. I highly doubt that I somehow travelled in time and started using NaCl even before Chromium was released.

      I agree it can result in more cross-platform games, though.

  • For what else would you like a native client in a consumer product.

  • ... with integrated pepper?

    Some Googlers seem to appreciate wordplay :)

  • Once Google gets this out - knowing competitors will not pick it up - and leverage it's massive weight by paying devs and advertising everywhere - we may actually get some decent games done for it.
    But only Chrome will play them, the open standard is just a trick there, as, once again, no one else will implement it for a long while.

    Once Chrome has captured market, Google has end-to-end web control, and that is a little bit scary.

  • What is the benefit other than porting native apps to run in a browser? The article linked to says that the Pepper interface is a binding layer that converts the native calls into stuff that can be done in HTML5. That's great but ... native apps will now be limited to the performance of the HTML5 engine unless I'm missing something. So yeah you can get platform independence as long as you are willing to have an interpreted layer between your code and the OS. Isn't that the same thing Java gives you? How abo
    • by darinf (544413)
      It is not that Pepper is limited to the performance of HTML5. Rather, Pepper is limited to the same security restrictions as HTML5. There is a compatible security model for NaCl and JS. That's what is different and unique about this plugin model (NaCl+Pepper), as compared to NPAPI or ActiveX.
    • by gl4ss (559668)

      well, they can run for example run an emulator core in the c++ side, so you could get "in browser" psx emulators and stuff like that, or the ai core.

      more likely, they'll implement opengl inside from that c++ and some sound apis too, like in android.

    • by randomErr (172078)
      You're sorta right. This is a hybrid approach of Java and ActiveX/COM. Its like Java it that it runs in its own virtual machine. The big different is that Java is a generic VM that is meant to run on any system. This is targeting a specfic processor with a specfic API on newer technology kinda like ActiveX. Unlike ActiveX/COM and like Java its not 'suppose' to give you full OS level API. Overall this will be optimized to the hilt with a very specfic (read narrow focus) VM enviorment.
  • Who cares if they're making HTML 5 games when they're doing browser detection that blocks other HTML5 capable browsers instead of doing feature detection to tell if the browser supports all the features needed to run?

  • They should start to re-enable it. I use XP on a netbook which has a ION, it's a very powerful GPU for a netbook, I can play movie on 1080p because it uses the GPU to render it. Flash video *were* also accelerated, but not now. Google decided that on XP, they disable all GPU acceleration. So now all the video (like youtube), all flash games, etc, are driven by the poor Atom...

    Why they forced a disable is beyond me, there is no way to re-enable it except by going back to Chrome 7 or something like that.

If you're not careful, you're going to catch something.

Working...