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Latest Humble Bundle Comes With Uplink Source Code 96

Posted by Soulskill
from the linux-still-in-the-lead dept.
SharkLaser writes "The latest Humble Bundle comes with four great indie games from Introversion. Included in the pack are Uplink, Darwinia, DEFCON and Multiwinia. Bonus games include Aquaria, Crayon Physics Deluxe and the recently added Dungeons of Dredmor. Introversion also showcases some of their prototypes, like Subversion City Generator which demonstrates procedural generation of complex city environments, and Voxel Tech Demo for showing destroyable environments using voxel technology. Hackers and open source programmers around the world should also celebrate — Introversion will release source code for their games Darwinia, Multiwinia, DEFCON, and most importantly, Uplink, the legendary hacking simulation that is one of a kind."
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Latest Humble Bundle Comes With Uplink Source Code

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  • The License (Score:5, Informative)

    by ilovepi (1413699) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @02:34AM (#38211356)
    While it's definitely cool that the Bundle now comes with the code for these game, make sure you read the license for publication of any finished product; while it's understandable that Introversion would want people to pay for the software, the license requires that a developer contact Introversion if they make a port, and they don't allow porting to a multitude of consumer devices (anything nintendo, sony, or microsoft makes) even if the end-user is required to buy the media required to play the game (such that they would need to purchase the full PC version.) So keep this in mind before making a PSP version (like someone did with the Aquaria source released in the first Humble Bundle.) As a modding platform and possibly as a learning tool, providing the source is very nice of Introversion. So, for the most part, kudos to them.
    • Re:The License (Score:5, Informative)

      by Luke Wilson (1626541) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @03:02AM (#38211476)
      License linked from humble bundle: http://www.introversion.co.uk/uplink/developer/license.html [introversion.co.uk]
    • Re:The License (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @03:22AM (#38211558)

      That's because one of the previous humble bundles included a source code release, and it was ported to iOS and sold by another team as though they'd made it.
      http://www.destructoid.com/lugaru-shamelessly-resold-without-consent-on-itunes-193156.phtml

      • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        which was completely illegal, since the data/art was not GPL, so no excuse for not licencing it with something a little more open. At least make it possible to distribute the code (not the art) freely so that a git repository can be made.

        • Re:The License (Score:5, Insightful)

          by CmdrPony (2505686) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @05:15AM (#38212004)
          There is SVN and developer wiki and forum access to everyone who has bought humble bundle (and for previous developers). It's yours for whatever amount you choose to pay.

          No other company goes that far. Almost no one releases sources for their games. And honestly, after reading this crying, I can't really blame them. No matter how much they try to please geeks, they always rant about how it's not exactly something they want, how they don't want to pay for it (even if that's $1) and how it's not on their favorite repo. They even have Linux versions of their games, which is a common rant topic here on slashdot. But now that it doesn't fit, you still have to rant about something just for the hell of it.

          Even sometimes, be thankful for something good.
          • Re:The License (Score:5, Insightful)

            by shish (588640) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @06:20AM (#38212218) Homepage

            Even sometimes, be thankful for something good

            It's possible to be thankful *and* point out possible improvements

            • Do you do that at christmas or birthday parties? Im sure it would go over really well, you should try that-- "yea, this gift is good, but you know what would have been really nice?"

          • Re:The License (Score:4, Insightful)

            by Ginger Unicorn (952287) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @07:40AM (#38212566)
            A handful of people noisily whinging on internet forums are not usually representative of the general population. People don't usually feel the urge to rant about how content or satisfied they are.
            • by X0563511 (793323)

              A handful of people noisily whinging on internet forums are not usually representative of the general population. People don't usually feel the urge to rant about how content or satisfied they are.

              whine. whine whine whine. NOT WHING.

              </whine>

              • by Anonymous Coward

                Whinge, actually. It's British.

              • Re:The License (Score:5, Informative)

                by tjwhaynes (114792) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @11:49AM (#38214832)

                whine. whine whine whine. NOT WHING.

                </whine>

                Actually, the root of whinging is whinge and if you haven't spent time in the British Isles, you probably don't recognise the term.

                From the freedictionary.com
                whinge (hwnj, wnj)
                intr.v. whinged, whinging, whinges Chiefly British
                To complain or protest, especially in an annoying or persistent manner.
                [Dialectal alteration of Middle English whinsen, from Old English hwinsian.]
                whinger n.
                whingingly adv.

                • by X0563511 (793323)

                  Well. You learn something 'new' every day.

                  Thanks for correcting me, I had no idea!

                  • That's why I always check things out before I bust on someone for being wrong.

                    Of course, there are still tons of opportunities to point out real mistakes. :-)

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        That's because one of the previous humble bundles included a source code release, and it was ported to iOS and sold by another team as though they'd made it.

        It's even worse than that. That game was also pirated to the Mac App Store!

        http://apple.slashdot.org/story/11/02/03/1335213/pirated-app-sold-on-mac-app-store [slashdot.org]

  • Woo! Uplink! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Bovius (1243040) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @02:38AM (#38211384)

    I know that admitting this means I have to turn in my Obscure Indie Game Enthusiast card, but I didn't know about Uplink until yesterday when I bought the newest Humble Bundle. Played it some today. Still amazed that they made the idea work at all, and that it's actually quite a bit of fun.

    We all owe a huge debt of gratitude to Introversion for their pioneering work in indie games. I know that their games have a particular flair that doesn't appeal to everyone, but *that's the whole point* of indie games; with enough independent developers, you eventually get something quirky and awesome that fits your particular tastes.

    • To be honest, playing Uplink just for the soundtrack makes it totally worth it! The music is available on their website (at least, it was, I'm sure you can get it somewhere).
      • I actually examined their music.dat (zip file), investigated the .uni file format, and even found one standalone player that could play those. But I didn't like that, so I checked the strings inside the music files, grabbed the author name, and googled. Karsten Koch: The Blue Valley [aufgang.org] (main theme, I like this one the most).

    • by Mathinker (909784)

      I've been a big supporter of the Humble Bundles (anyone willing to give me native games for Linux gets my attention), but kind of "ran out of steam" (no pun intended) and gave the Voxatron one a pass.

      At the beginning, just the marketing concept was enough to "sell" a bundle for me. But now I actually look at the games and decide if I feel that it's worth my while.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        IMHO, the Voxatron bundle was worth it just for The Binding of Isaac. A very fun and hard game with a ton of content. Highly recommended.
        I passed on the Frozen Synapse bundle simply because I already had many of the games included (Frozen Synapse, SpaceChem , Trine :)

        • by X0563511 (793323)

          Totally the kind of game I hate to play, so that's entirely subjective.

          Same with me for the Frozen Synapse bundle though... though I went and paid for them again just for all the linux versions.

      • by trdrstv (986999)

        I've been a big supporter of the Humble Bundles (anyone willing to give me native games for Linux gets my attention), but kind of "ran out of steam" (no pun intended) and gave the Voxatron one a pass.

        At the beginning, just the marketing concept was enough to "sell" a bundle for me. But now I actually look at the games and decide if I feel that it's worth my while.

        Even if they release new bundles every 2 weeks I will continue to support them. At the very minimum I'll throw in $1 and give it all to charity then evaluate the games themselves and if they are worth more. If they are then I'll kick some more in, but if not then it's another $1 for charity.

    • Re:Woo! Uplink! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @04:31AM (#38211846)

      Still amazed that they made the idea work at all, and that it's actually quite a bit of fun.

      This.

      Business models based on data theft and/or vandalism for hire, chained anonymizing proxies with various levels of logging capabilities (or compromise :), SWATting opponents by (by faking records to send law enforcement after them), anonymizing bank transfers through the use of expendable proxy accounts, and you did all your hacking by renting a hardware platform of RAM/CPU/disk that existed (and was configured) through the cloud. And shadowy organizations whose agendas only become apparent when it's probably too late to change the color of your hat.

      The game - written in 2001 - was set in 2010, which turned out to be just one year away from commercial botnets, Anonymous, Wikileaks, the Lulzsec-vs-Sony-howling-thru-the-wires world tour, and the rise of EC3 and other cloud virtualization/hosting services.

      And the soundtrack, which someone else mentioned. They completely nailed the look-and-feel of all those goofy hacker movies of the 90s, while being not only fun, but downright prescient.

      • by Rysc (136391) *

        I'm just waiting for the follow-up Uplink MMO. The only thing the game was missing was real people on the other end. Imagine if they added the (eventual) ability to buy and build your own network and required you to learn to defend it.

        Please, Introversion, please?

  • DoD (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ShakaUVM (157947) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @02:40AM (#38211402) Homepage Journal

    Roguelike Dungeons of Dredmor, if you haven't played it yet, is worth the price of admission. Play it on hardcore mode for a very old-school Nethack experience. (You die, you die. Start over.)

    It's a bit biased in favor of wizards, but it has an overall very interesting class generation system and challenging gameplay.

    Plus, it's funny. Actually funny. But with good core mechanics beneath it all.

    • by FlyveHest (105693)

      It is a funny game, absolutely, but I must admit that the same-ness of the mobs and dungeons got boring after 20 or so hours of playing. (And, I still enjoy NetHacking from time to time)

      But the game is well worth the admission, no doubt about that.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    You've been able to buy the Uplink Source code for years, the Uplink Developer CD.
  • Although I liked playing Uplink, the quote "Uplink, the legendary hacking simulation that is one of its kind." is a bit hyperbolic. Does nobody remember the game Neuromancer (PC/C64) which is I believe one of the first and best hacking games till date?

    • by Tom (822)

      Uplink is actually a lot closer to the old C64 game Hacker [wikipedia.org] than to Neuromancer. Especially given that Uplink has a really cool beginning where for a second you are not sure if it's a game.

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      I remember Neuromancer, and while it was fun, I finished it off in a single evening. I recall it being short and linear, though the bit where you get some antagonist arrested by plugging his SSN and other info into an existing warrant in the police network was pretty entertaining and not too obvious. The battles against the AI, however, weren't so interesting. I haven't played Uplink yet (I downloaded it from Home of the Underdogs what seems like a lifetime ago, but never got around to playing it). Mayb

      • by Baloroth (2370816)
        Uplink is freelance style, so it is neither linear nor short. Does get a tiny bit repetitive, but that is it.
    • In addition to those old classics, there's the modern-day "Hacker Evolution" series from exosyphen, which are also pretty well done. Uplink is the only game in this bundle I don't already have, so I'm on the fence about purchasing.

  • by DaveAtWorkAnnoyingly (655625) on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @03:16AM (#38211528)
    I've been a long term fan of Introversion since 2002, I even went to their Darwinia launch party at their house, which was awesome. I was so stoked about the Humble IV Bundle that even though I had bought the games twice in the past (disc and steam) I had to buy this too, both to support IV and also Humble (backed by the same people who backed Google so probably don't need that much support!).

    Regards the source. That has been available for about 6 years now on the Uplink dev disc. This costs about £20. I haven't looked into the restrictions on using it but as the previous poster recommends, contact them before doing anything that might piss them off. They're really nice guys and deserve support for making what are, really enjoyable games. Uplink was in the PC Zone top 50 games, and in LXF's top 20 games for scaring the sh1t out of you.

    Hopefully this /.'ing will bake the bundle sell even more. It was at about $510,000 last night, so will be interesting to see how it goes up after this.
  • Bought.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Two games in the suite actually require product activation. I was disappointed to find this out, as this was what started me on my migration from Microsoft, oh so long ago.

    The two games in question are: Multiwinia and DEFCON.

    So don't plan on enjoying these games sans-DRM.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 30, 2011 @08:33AM (#38212796)

      Oh come on! Having to use a cd-key has NOTHING to do with DRM! It is a quite valid method to verify you actually bought the game so you can use their matchmaking servers. It would be unfair for such a small studio to be forced with the burden of increased costs due to extra traffic by non-paying users. Plus, both games are multiplayer oriented, which explains the reason behind the keys.

      Go on and read CmdrPony's post (#38212004). I think it's valid for you too.

  • I'm glad that this 'advert' got posted to Slashdot. I wouldn't have been aware of it otherwise and have now given $10 to get these games for my Mac. I used to have Darwinia ages ago, but I think it was just the demo. I've been aware of the other games for some time and will play them when I get around to it. Time to post a link on Facebook and inform my friends as well.

  • I'm amazed at the high average donation this time around. IIRC the last few Humble Bundles I bought into had an average of around $2. At the time of writing the average on this bundle is $3.98. I guess these games offer pretty good value.
    • by rdwulfe (890032)

      I'm amazed at the high average donation this time around. IIRC the last few Humble Bundles I bought into had an average of around $2. At the time of writing the average on this bundle is $3.98. I guess these games offer pretty good value.

      Depends on when you buy it in the bundle's lifecycle, too. I know the average for the last Bundle I bought (before this one) was like 4 or 5 when I purchased it. I was glad to drop 10 bucks on it at the time. This one? I had Uplink already, on disk. I'll GLADLY buy it again, get all the other things, and so on. And I got source code? Well freaking awesome. I'd say these Bundles are awesome. They're cheap enough I don't even blink, and they quite often offer much more than one would expect.

      I got the one with

    • by hipp5 (1635263)
      I just re-read my post and realized that it looks like I am suggesting this average is not deserved. I am not. I think it's great to see averages and I was just pointing out that this seems to be the case here.
    • I'm amazed at the high average donation this time around. IIRC the last few Humble Bundles I bought into had an average of around $2. At the time of writing the average on this bundle is $3.98. I guess these games offer pretty good value.

      The higher average price might also be - if you pay more then the (at payment time) average price paid then you get another two games (and so then the average goes up slightly)

      The average now is $4.06

  • both in fullscreen AND in windowed mode the window spans over both monitors, making the game unusable. can i somehow set which resolution to be used in windowed mode or something like this?

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