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Mozilla Open Source Games Technology

Mozilla Releases HTML5 MMO BrowserQuest 138

Posted by Soulskill
from the you-got-your-game-in-my-interwebs dept.
New submitter rasmuswikman sends this quote from an announcement at hacks.mozilla.org: "BrowserQuest is a tribute to classic video-games with a multiplayer twist. You play as a young warrior driven by the thrill of adventure. No princess to save here, just a dangerous world filled with treasures to discover. And it's all done in glorious HTML5 and JavaScript. Even better, it's open-source, so be sure to check out the source code on GitHub!"
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Mozilla Releases HTML5 MMO BrowserQuest

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  • by suso (153703) * on Tuesday March 27, 2012 @02:53PM (#39488895) Homepage Journal

    I'm waiting to see thousands of new players enter the arena in real time. Should be interesting.

    • by suso (153703) *

      Eh, disappointing turnout.

      • While I was playing a moment ago, there were 74 players at peak (that I noted), and never fewer than 68-- in the same instance as me. Total online was 1700+.

    • by GNious (953874)

      Is running VERY slowly with 74 players on the server I ended up at ... and Firefox was complaining about scripts not responding.
      Is pretty cool demo, but need more polishing.

    • by EdIII (1114411)

      I'm waiting to see thousands of new players enter the arena in real time. Should be interesting.

      I'm just waiting for one player.... me.

    • by hairyfeet (841228)

      I'm waiting to see someone explain WHY, for the love of Pete why? with ALL the trouble Mozilla has had lately, declining share, practically zero adoption in the mobile space, the well documented problems with memory leaks, extensions getting killed by version jumps, extensions making the leaks worse, why are they wasting resources making a fricking browser based MMO?

      Hey Moz, you wanna fart around? that's cool, but don't be surprised if you wake up one day and find your share of the browser market dried up.

      • This is a "hey, look what we can do!" maneuver. Sort of like: "In your face `chrome experiemnts' and `google IO app'". I don't recall anybody else demonstrating such a big part of HTML5 (graphics,sound,sockets) so successfully.

        Props to Moz. for doing this.

        Also a small point: This is how gaming should look like all along IMO, I don't want to have to install 18TB of data in order to start playing anything. Nor do I want to have to read through manuals and strategy guides before actually doing gameplay. Games

      • I'm waiting to see someone explain WHY, for the love of Pete why?

        To show that you don't need Flash to build realistic games. And open-source it as an incentive to companies to adopt free technologies -- that's the point of Mozilla -- open the web.

        with ALL the trouble Mozilla has had lately, declining share,

        The share has not been declining, actually growing in absolute numbers. The total number of web users is growing all the time. Mozilla isn't terribly worried if other open web browsers gain more share -- as long as there is a diverse market, it's good for the open web.

        practically zero adoption in the mobile space

        They are working on that -- the recent announcement on adopti

  • by iONiUM (530420) on Tuesday March 27, 2012 @03:00PM (#39488979) Homepage Journal

    I cannot. Just says "Connecting to Server.."

    Is it slashdotted?

  • Nice job linking with https to hacks.mozilla.org.

    Firefox immediately starts whining about it.

  • Mozilla's way of massively load-testing their servers. Now damn it let me play!
  • In my opinion WebSocket is the real technology we are waiting for building stuff on the internet that make people collaboration or play together. Having the ability of the server to push data to the client without having to get a pooling every x seconds or so is a big plus. This game give us a great example of simple communication using WebSocket, too bad it not yet available on all major browser (IE).
    • by Desler (1608317)

      IE 10 PP5 implements the websockets RFC.

    • by lennier (44736)

      In my opinion WebSocket is the real technology we are waiting for building stuff on the internet that make people collaboration or play together. Having the ability of the server to push data to the client without having to get a pooling every x seconds or so is a big plus.

      So basically, we've moved boldly forward from the bad old 1970s client-server days of raw TCP over IP, to the glorious new Web 3.0 days of TCP over HTTP over JavaScript over HTML over HTTP over TCP over IP. That's a.... win?

      • First WebSocket is not raw socket. It's TCP over IP (packet ordering and delivered garanties). The right now, there is no freaking way the server PUSH data to the client. For instance but a very very simple chat room. Everyone in the page type stuff and everyone see it. Well if you don't use WebSocket you need to make sure every single client refresh the page every x seconds. - There will be a lag - There will be huge waiste of bandwith and server processing for nothing. With WebSocket, when someone sen
  • Interesting use of Web technologies. But as a practical matter, isn't storing user progress data on the client side a really bad idea from an anti-cheating standpoint? How long until someone releases an editor?

    • Interesting use of Web technologies. But as a practical matter, isn't storing user progress data on the client side a really bad idea from an anti-cheating standpoint?

      Not necessarily.

      Storing it on the client and sending it back from the client to the server and having the server trust the client is a bad idea from that standpoint, but just storing it on the client isn't, as long as it is also stored on the server and the server doesn't get it from the client. The description isn't clear on the exact role o

      • by nschubach (922175)

        A simple hurdle for those wanting to hack... the client could send the server a hash of the local data, and compare it to the server hash to detect "cheating." Of course, you'd have to send the hole binary blob up to the server to do it so the client couldn't just fake the hash. On second thought, it sounds like a PITA. Just let them hack saves for a tech demo.

    • It's possible to use the client for data storage but sign and/or encrypt all the data so that you know the client hasn't modified it.

      This approach has actually been gaining momentum lately. For example, everyone knows that cookies shouldn't be used for storing important data (such as whether the client has logged in to a web service and what his user id is) so the traditional method is to store session data on the server and just store the session id in the cookie. However, play! [playframework.org] (a framework that finally

  • I beat the final boss and got 17 out 20 achievements in about 15 minutes. I wasn't going to stick around to take 5000 damage or find the two hidden achievements.

    • They only took about 10 minutes for me to find, and both are (spoiler-ish) fairly blatant meme references like many of the other things in the game. I'd love to see this developed more as it seems to run pretty well and could have some real potential. I've half-assed some JS RPGs myself and its always nice to see it being done "right" and with a playable final product.
    • Check out the source code. Sounds like you need to find a "Rick" NPC character to talk to: if(npc.kind === Types.Entities.RICK) {
      this.tryUnlockingAchievement("RICKROLLD");
      }
  • When you start to play, your browser opens up a WebSocket connection to one of several load-balanced game servers.

    I guess they are all VIC-20s then, given how fast they got slashdotted.

    • They're running NodeJS.

      NodeJS: letting everyone write their own servers in Javascript like that's a good idea since whenever the hell it came out.

  • Does any one know what the 'Mystery Achievement' is? I've got 19/20...

  • by sdnoob (917382) on Tuesday March 27, 2012 @03:53PM (#39489647)

    supposed to be posted early in the morning, instead of at the end of the work day?

  • by loufoque (1400831) on Tuesday March 27, 2012 @04:06PM (#39489801)

    Threads, networking, sound, graphics...
    What next?

    Maybe someday, web developers will be on par with applications developers from the 70s!

    • by Shadowhawk (30195)
      I know I'm feeding the troll here, but what application developers has access to threads (or sound or graphics even) in the 70s? First reference to threads I can find is SunOS 4.x, which came out in 82. The 80s is also when some sounds and graphics became available on many computers (Commodore Vic-20, Atari 2600, IBM PC, Apple II, etc). There might have been specialty computers that had those features, but nothing available for the average application developer in the 70s.
      • by loufoque (1400831)

        UNIX had multitasking since the 60s or 70s.
        Granted, that's not exactly threads, but the difference is sufficiently small for it to matter.

        My original statement didn't mean to be accurate anyway.

      • by dzfoo (772245)

        You know that application developer does not necessarily mean "PC" or "microcomputer" developer, right?

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        All threads are essentially are lightweight processes (some times they are even called LWPs). What a thread exactly is depends upon the implementation, sometimes it is shared memory, some times it is not, etc. Basically most operating systems before the 70's implemented processes that very much looked like what we'd call threads today.

      • Not sure about the VIC-20 but the Atari VCS and HCS (Home Computer System) and Apple ][ came out in the 70s. ProLogic's "Flight Simulator" for the Atari HCS is a good example of a game that utilises multiple threads of execution to simulate flying a airplane via polygonal graphics. This is in contrast to most games that have a main thread and a background thread ran by the vertical blank interrupt.
        (and perhaps a third ran by the horizontal blank interrupt)

        And don't forget Texas Instruments' TI-99/4 (and

  • Does it have a cheap plastic imitation of the Amulet of Yendor? I'm not interested if it doesn't have a cheap plastic imitation Amulet.
    • by alexo (9335)

      Does it have a cheap plastic imitation of the Amulet of Yendor? I'm not interested if it doesn't have a cheap plastic imitation Amulet.

      Greetings to a fellow CoCo-nut, you just killed my productivity for today.

      • by jonadab (583620)
        I have no idea what a CoCo-nut is.

        The cheap plastic imitation of the Amulet of Yendor is found on the fake bones pile on the "Rogue level" in NetHack, and sometimes also in real bones piles (when the former player died with either a cheap plastic amulet or the real AoY in his possession). The cheap plastic amulet is also what you get if you try to wish for the Amulet of Yendor. When not formally identified, it appears as "The Amulet of Yendor". Unlike the real Amulet, however, the cheap plastic one can b
  • Well that was kind of fun for about 30 minutes, by then I'd gotten the Ultimate Sword and the Golden Armor and I demolished the Skeleton King and then there wasn't much point to keep playing.
    • by dewatf (209360)
      I spent an hour exploring it all and completing all the quests. For the get 5000 damage I just stood next to a skeleton and went and had lunch. There were a few players doing that which looked quite funny.

      Once you know where everything is you can sneak past the monsters in your T-shirt and get to an unguarded drop where you can get everything you need kill the Skeleton King in a couple of minutes. It is just a simple demonstration of the technology. As it is open source someone might make a dungeon with goo

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