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Sony Taking Down PSP Titles In Response To Vita Hackers 293

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the we-control-the-vertical dept.
Carlos Rodriguez writes "The hacker community has found a way to make the Vita run unsigned code by exploiting weaknesses in PSP games available for download in the PSN store. In response, Sony has made the affected games unavailable for download for all platforms — PSP and Vita both — even if you had already paid for it and hadn't had the chance to download it yet. In the case of 'Everybody's Tennis', the game was removed from the PSN worldwide after the modder community bragged about the game being exploitable but before any exploit was released for it. Is Sony being too overzealous in its fight against piracy?"
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Sony Taking Down PSP Titles In Response To Vita Hackers

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  • This is Sony (Score:5, Informative)

    by crazyjj (2598719) * on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:47AM (#39495851)

    For those not familiar with this company, who may ask "But won't they lose money if they take down the games?", let me give you some background. This is a company that would rather pull EVERY game on PSN than to lose even the slightest bit of control over their locked-down system. This is a company that will infect their CD's with viruses [wikipedia.org] to prevent copying, a company that repeatedly kills its own platforms with its insistence on proprietary [wikipedia.org] formats [wikipedia.org], a company that doesn't care [anandtech.com] if your old blu-ray player plays the latest blu-rays or not--a company that will remove any feature [wikipedia.org], cripple any platform [1up.com], pull any game, destroy any product line--all to maintain control. If Sony were faced tomorrow morning with the choice between risking people copying even one of their movies and bulldozing the entire PSP line into a landfill, they would have that landfill full before the sun went down.

    This is what happens when you allow a media producer to mix in the same company with the producer of the hardware that plays said media.

    • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:59AM (#39496029)
      What always confuses me is why anybody ever buys anything from Sony. They started to go mental in the mid-90's, and then went full retard in the early '00's. At this point surely you'd have to be a masochist to willingly purchase a Sony product and subject yourself to such treatment?
      • Funny - I have a Sony clock radio and when I put my iPod in there, it plays music. It also wakes me up in the morning at the time I set on the alarm. I also own a Sony eReader, and when I tap on one of my books, the words come up on the screen and, when I swipe my finger across the page, it advances forward or backward accordingly.

        No masochism involved.

        • by jd2112 (1535857)

          Funny - I have a Sony clock radio and when I put my iPod in there, it plays music. It also wakes me up in the morning at the time I set on the alarm. I also own a Sony eReader, and when I tap on one of my books, the words come up on the screen and, when I swipe my finger across the page, it advances forward or backward accordingly.

          No masochism involved.

          I have a Sony blu-ray player that in order to use any feature above just playing disks I had to create an account on Sony's web site and give them a bunch of personal information. I think this is necessary to update the device as well.

          • by delinear (991444)
            Particularly nauseating given how well they've demonstrated they'll look after your personal information. My last Sony purchase was a PS1. Admittedly the last time I tried it about 12 years ago it was still working, but only if I stood it upside down so the lid rested on the ground. Sony used to be the watchword for quality, then sometime in the 90s they figured they could trade on the name but reduce quality to boost profits.
        • Re:This is Sony (Score:4, Informative)

          by Lonewolf666 (259450) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:37AM (#39496487)

          Well, I would not trust Sony with anything that has a processor and might need a firmware update at some point.

          They have, however, made some pretty decent analog equipment in the past. I still have an old set of walkman headphones that works fine and sounds good after 20 years. The only thing I had to replace at some point were the ear pads.

        • Re:This is Sony (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Nerdfest (867930) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:50AM (#39496629)

          You buy from Sony *and* Apple and say you're not a masochist? They're the two biggest offenders when it comes to control of content, proprietary formats and connectors and abuse of customers. You may be in denial.

          • True, they're two big offenders, but in my opinion not the two biggest. How is Apple a bigger offender than Nintendo?
            • To explore this a little bit, consider that Nintendo is a gaming company. Everything they do is centered around producing video game consoles and games to play on them. As long as the devices they sell can do that, I imagine most people don't care that they are locked down. Plus, it's not like you can do homebrew/hacking any more easily on the Sony or Microsoft systems.

              Apple, on the other hand, sells more general "lifestyle" devices. The iPhone isn't just a phone--it's a media device, it's a portable game console, it's a web client, etc. etc. And given that it is advertised to have those capabilities, I think it's fair for some to cry foul at the fact that even though the device can do a lot of things (and is advertised thusly by Apple), it can only do them Apple's way, for no good reason except that Apple wants to maintain strict control over the platform.

              Granted, most people don't care how hackable and open a particular device is, and I just avoid this whole issue by not purchasing Apple products. But I don't think the comparison to Nintendo is valid, because Nintendo sells devices for very specific purposes, and Apple's control of the iPhone is criticized because it is a more general-purpose device, intentionally crippled to serve Apple's interests.

              • by garcia (6573)

                I'm all for free and open. I like having that option. However I also like not having to worry all that much that some random app on my phone is going to possibly interfere with me making a call when I really need to or that it's not crashing my device over and over again because it wasn't carefully tested before showing up in the store.

                I recently bought a MacBook Pro. Why? Because at 33 years old and 15+ years of Linux experience and 30+ years of other computing experience I am tired of the bullshit. I want

                • by gorzek (647352)

                  I would agree with you, except that Apple could accomplish this easily enough by only allowing vetted apps in their online store while not forbidding installation of apps from outside the store. I think that's the part people tend to take issue with. If Apple says it's okay, and you want that "seal of approval," then great! But Apple goes a step further and also says, "you cannot install applications from outside our store." And some regard that as a bridge too far.

                  That's not to say Google's strategy is per

                  • by garcia (6573)

                    They don't forbid you to jailbreak your device (the reasons for this are obviously outside of their control) so you definitely have an option to run apps which are not vetted on your device.

                    • by gorzek (647352)

                      Ah, but you just illustrated the point perfectly. The only reason they "allow" jailbreaking is because a court said they couldn't forbid it.

                      Given the choice, they absolutely do opt for maximum control over the device you paid for.

            • by Nerdfest (867930)

              You're right ... I think I've pretty much written off Nintendo as a major player in any market, which may be short-sighted. The problem is that I know too many people who bought a Wii and it collected dust. I was thinking that people won't make the same mistake with their next platform, but I may be giving people way too much credit.

          • by dubbreak (623656)
            Not to sound like a fan boi, but those two aren't completely comparable. Sony wears rubber gloves while they put your balls in a vice while Apple clearly uses velvet gloves.
        • Their eInk readers are actually surprisingly good and not locked down... it's like they outsourced it or something.

        • by Kohath (38547) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @12:28PM (#39497715)

          Funny - I have a Sony clock radio and when I put my iPod in there, it plays music. It also wakes me up in the morning at the time I set on the alarm.

          It secretly hates you. It's just biding it's time. It's probably playing subliminal messages to you while you sleep, to hypnotize you into buying a new one in 5 or 6 years because the old one seemed to work correctly for that entire time. It's unbelievably insidious.

      • Because they sell the items normal persons think they want (PS3, PSP, Vaio). The thing is that once the consumer has gotten involved and invested in your product you can fsck with him as much as you like since they will still try to cling on to the idea they've been sold.

        It common knowledge in corpoland... I know, I know, these are sad times to live in.

      • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anrego (830717) * on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:39AM (#39496515)

        The group of people who understand the nature of Sony, the relevance of this kind of behavior, or care at all is relatively small.

        Lest we forget, after the PSN hack and all that personal info got stolen, the absolute loudest cry was from gamers who wanted the PSN back up ASAP. The people who understood the nature of Sony's fuckup and that a huge chunk of their personal info just got stolen make up a very tiny portion of Sony's customer base.

        In addition to that, people are just plain used to companies being evil. It just happens that Sony is evil in a way that is particularily relevant to us. It's important to remind ourselves that the rest of the world really doesn't care about this stuff.

        • by neokushan (932374)

          Actually I'm pretty sure the loudest cry was from various people who had lost access to OtherOS and wanted it back. The difference is, they were cries of laughter.

          Every now and then, Sony completely and utterly fucks up in some catastrophic way. Each time it happens, they piss off a whole bunch of people in the process. Like many here, I'm shocked that people even bother with them but they do happen to make somewhat compelling products.

          • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Informative)

            by Anrego (830717) * on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @11:06AM (#39496831)

            The OtherOS is actually a perfect example.

            In this community we heard about it non-stop for what feels like years. Outside this community, no one really cared. Yes Sony lost some business, but even if everyone who could explain in a sentence what the OtherOS thing was about stopped buying Sony, it would probably be a tiny blip on the profit statement.

            Same with the geohotz thing. Huge deal to us, non-issue for most. The rootkit thing is the closest Sony ever came to doing something that actually pissed of a large chunk of their users with an issue (outside the PSN thing, but again, people were upset for the wrong reason).. and even that most people wern't mad enough to swear of Sony products forever.. it was more of an amused "well that was naughty of them" response from the vast majority of people.

            • Re:This is Sony (Score:4, Interesting)

              by tlhIngan (30335) <<slashdot> <at> <worf.net>> on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @12:57PM (#39498077)

              The OtherOS is actually a perfect example.

              In this community we heard about it non-stop for what feels like years. Outside this community, no one really cared. Yes Sony lost some business, but even if everyone who could explain in a sentence what the OtherOS thing was about stopped buying Sony, it would probably be a tiny blip on the profit statement.

              Same with the geohotz thing. Huge deal to us, non-issue for most. The rootkit thing is the closest Sony ever came to doing something that actually pissed of a large chunk of their users with an issue (outside the PSN thing, but again, people were upset for the wrong reason).. and even that most people wern't mad enough to swear of Sony products forever.. it was more of an amused "well that was naughty of them" response from the vast majority of people.

              OtherOS was perfect. Microsoft learned with their Xbox what happens when hackers and pirates share a common goal - one inevitably helps the other. In that case, the Xbox-Linux folks found vulnerabilities that they told Microsoft about, in exchange for a legit way of running Linux. Microsoft rebuffed them, and Xbox Linux released their installation tools. The pirates siezed upon that and Xbox piracy was born.

              OtherOS was the same - those who wanted homebrew had a perfect outlet for it, and busy playing there meant the pirates really didn't have much they could do since homebrew in OtherOS was restricted.

              But remove OtherOS and all of a sudden those hackers had to break into GameOS to run Linux... and now that GameOS was broken, pirates could come in with ISO loaders. And then researchers came in and studied the hacks and realized what else they could do until ti cascaded to the point where the keys were discovered.

              The Xbox360 has suffered piracy attacks, but also has a homebrew avenue (XNA studio). The interesting thing is while there's piracy on the Xbox, the integrity of the system hasn't been compromised - you cannot plug a modded Xbox into Xbox Live because the dashboard is signed and reports back to Microsoft, and unsigned dashboards don't really run.

              PSN though is another story - with the master keys available, the whole "trust the client" part of PSN doesn't exist anymore, and you can get CFW's for PS3 that let you play ISOs AND get on PSN.

              And all of it happened within a year of Sony removing OtherOS. Hell, the PSN hack was just over a year later (April 1, 2010 - OtherOS was removed. Aprile 2011 - PSN hacked).

              You know, if Sony continually does this, one could make the Vita's PSN ability worthless if games keep getting removed.

              I understand Sony's reluctance about piracy, given it helped speed the demise of the PSP, but perhaps if Sony wasn't so greedy on the PSP on the first place. Like how UMD videos could get full 60fps video decode, while memory stick videos could only do 30fps (later fixed). Or how an "install to memory stick" feature wasn't implemented to allow loading UMD games off faster memory stick. (Sony could use MagicGate to lock the UMD image to one PSP and require the UMD to be present to play the game, negating piracy fears a la the Xbox 360). But they didn't, and CFW made the whole PSP experience far better - the benefits of loading games from memory stick meant less loading screens to wait through, full res full framerate videos, etc.

        • by whoever57 (658626)

          The group of people who understand the nature of Sony, the relevance of this kind of behavior, or care at all is relatively small.

          A couple of years ago, I sat next to someone on a plane who sold broadcast studio equipment for Sony. When I mentioned the rootkit fiasco, he had no idea what I was talking about.

      • by mlts (1038732) *

        The ironic thing is that Sony makes very good products. Even back in the late '90s, their "MP3" [1] players were well made.

        Sony could have had the whole MP3 player market just like they did with the portable cassette players, where the generic term became "Walkman". However, the extreme DRM on OpenMG, then Sonic stage caused people to look elsewhere... and even though Apple's offerings were lackluster, people could copy music to it, and with a little sleight of hand, copy their music from the device.

        I wis

        • by delinear (991444)
          Don't forget that Sony were also worried about cannibalising what they saw as the real future of portable music - MiniDisc. The holy grail for Sony seems always to be to own the consumable part of the market (Betamax, MiniDisc, CD, DVD, BDR, not to mention their various portable gaming formats, etc - they've had their thumb in pretty much every pie to some extent).
      • by BStroms (1875462)

        Because I don't generally take to boycotts or activism against corporations. When I buy something I ask myself two questions.

        1. Do I think the value of this object is greater than the money I'm paying for it.

        2. Is there a more cost efficient way to get the same value.

        My Sony purchases over my life have been limited to a PS1, PS2, PS3, and PSP (and of course related software.) At least for those four items, I don't regret my purchases in the least. I definitely got my money's worth. To be honest, it's pure

      • by Kohath (38547)

        Because, to most people, buying an item from someone isn't like getting married to them. It's a game, not a relationship. It's a set of headphones, not a religion.

        I've never understood why people like you anthropomorphize a company of hundreds of thousands of people as if they were one person -- and not even a real person, but some style of outlandish cartoon villain. I suspect it's because believing fantasy stories is somehow more real or seems more personally fulfilling than anything the real world has

    • For fuck's sake - go and look up the definition of 'virus' as it pertains to computers.
    • Re:This is Sony (Score:4, Informative)

      by LordLimecat (1103839) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:01AM (#39496061)

      For the record, it was a rootkit, not a virus. The terms are already muddy as all getout, but there IS a difference.

    • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Dhalka226 (559740) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:02AM (#39496065)

      Not that I am defending their actions, but I do wonder if there is something cultural going on. Is there something in particular about Japanese culture that encourages that degree of control (or perhaps "order")?

      The extents to which they are willing to go seem extreme, even compared to other companies who are charter members aboard the DRM bandwagon. Is there something more to it than just "Sony = teh sux?"

      • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Interesting)

        by jythie (914043) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:11AM (#39496177)
        Money is just tokenized power, control is another. Powerful people seek, well, power, and being able to control how people use what you sell gives just as much of a high has making lots of money off of it. That power then translates to respect within your community, which results in promotions and options at other companies.

        In other words, once you realize that the motivations are not corporate profit but instead individual advancement and status, such behavior seems a lot less insane. This is also the core of the MPAA/RIAA's behavior, both are industries where careers are made or broken by reputation, so control/power are more important to the individual then group profit.
      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        Nintendo is about as Japanese as they get, but I don't see them taking the same actions with any of their systems. They haven't made much trouble for the people who want to have homebrew on the Wii. They don't like it when you run cheatcodes on online games like MarioKart, but other than that, they have have been pretty friendly towards the homebrew market on the Wii. They've made a few changes here and there to make it more difficult to mod the Wii, and run pirated games. But the fact that it can still e
        • Re:This is Sony (Score:5, Interesting)

          by gman003 (1693318) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:50AM (#39496641)

          Note, however, that Nintendo is from a different region of Japan (Kyoto), with a significantly different culture.

          Think of the difference between a New York City company, and a Boston company, or perhaps a New Orleans company. It's... something like that.

          From what I can tell, Kyoto is much more conservative and traditional, but also more rural and more... relaxed, I suppose. They have a different accent (kansai-ben), which loosely corresponds to either a southern accent, or a boston accent, at least culturally.

          There's also the fact that Nintendo is now effectively run by the game developers - Miyamoto is still a Senior Managing Director, and Iwata (the President) worked on Earthbound and Kirby as a programmer. Sony, meanwhile, is run by businessmen, for business.

        • by Turken (139591)

          Yeah, Nintendo doesn't jerk their customers around quite like SONY, but they're not perfect either. The problem with Nintendo is that they're instead obsessed with controlling their image.

          Friend Codes, poor network support, rejected games for the download stores -- Nintendo would rather pull out system functionality than allow someone to possibly be offended by the actions of another person and somehow associate that offense with the hardware rather than the user.

      • by alen (225700)

        nope, there have been articles written about the company and how the media guys are always crippling cool hardware that sony tries to make. they run to the board and scream piracy and sony ends up releasing crappy hardware.

        back in the 1980's when they had too much money it seemed like a good idea to control the content as well, but in the age of apple you release good hardware or die off

    • by Atomus (2500840)
      Agreed. There was a time (read: over a decade ago) I was naive to their practices towards customers and loved their products, but as the curtains pull away and shed light on how they treat their customers, I can no longer support them by buying their products (as I'm sure alot of /.'ers do now). And until the mainstream people are more informed and decide to not buy Sony products too, Sony will constantly be in control-freak mode. No amount of hacking, exploiting, copying, data-breaching, etc., is going
    • I wrote this several years ago when the PS3 was on the verge of being released. They're a company that you just can't trust to do the sane thing let alone the right thing. I bet most of you forget that the original PS3 controller was fifteen-feet wide and curved like a boomerang.

      http://thepcspy.com/read/how_sony_screwed_up/ [thepcspy.com]

    • Thank you for your post - I couldn't have said all of this better. But saying "this is why Sony is hacked all the time" is not completely correct. Sony is hacked all the time because their IT is neglected, the staff is demotivated and the management is incompetent. They just deserve to be hacked.
    • by jdgeorge (18767)

      So, people are complaining because Sony is refusing to let them buy something on line? Or are the people complaining just complaining because they hate Sony, and they're really not interested in the content Sony is refusing to sell?

      It sounds like the latter case, because I don't see people saying "I really wanted that game! Why can't I buy it now?" Instead, I see posts whining about how Sony is evil, they'd never buy from Sony, and trying to tie their gripes to this incident.

      If you really hate Sony, the don

      • by neokushan (932374)

        I think it's more to do with Sony's draconian policies. If certain known hacker types mention a game, Sony immediately pulls it from the PSN. The thing is, even if the game was "hacked", it doesn't actually allow piracy, it just allows some simple homebrew. The floodgates to piracy, perhaps, but any vaguely intelligent company would see it as an opportunity and give people more access to the hardware, allowing them to legitimately run homebrew.

    • by Sez Zero (586611)

      Dear Sony,

      What the fuck, dude?

      Sincerely,
      Long-time (and increasingly becoming former) customer

  • Too overzealous? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:53AM (#39495929)

    You mean overzealous? Or Too zealous?

  • Sony is so stupid it hurts sometimes. It's like they do everything they can to sabotage themselves. How many times can they shoot themselves in the foot and stay in business? I imagine a few more since they've got some cash in the bank, but this just isn't sustainable.
    • Re:It hurts (Score:4, Insightful)

      by GameboyRMH (1153867) <gameboyrmh@gm[ ].com ['ail' in gap]> on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:30AM (#39496389) Journal

      People said the same thing about MS and Apple, the problem is that most consumers have a nasty case of beaten wife syndrome.

      • by jdgeorge (18767)

        I missed how this incident hurts consumers. In this case, they're not modifying your existing system, taking away something you already had, stealing (or exposing) your personal information, or anything else that people normally get upset about.

        People who wanted to hack/homebrew their stuff have known for a long time that Sony isn't friendly to that, so they buy from others.

  • Just overload them with blog posts of people bragging about being exploitable.

    • D'oh. Used square braces..
      Bragging about (game) being exploitable.

    • Just start a low level discussion about how there is a backdoor in Skyrim that lets you root the PS3.

    • Re:DoS idea (Score:5, Funny)

      by gman003 (1693318) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:12AM (#39496203)

      Brilliant plan.

      *ahem* Personally, I've found exploits in the following games:
      Army Corps of Hell
      Asphalt Injection
      BlazBlue: Continuum Shift Extend
      Disgaea 3: Absence of Detention
      Dream Club Zero Portable
      Dungeon Hunter: Alliance
      Everybody's Golf 6
      F1 2011
      Little Deviants
      Lord of Apocalypse
      Michael Jackson: The Experience
      Ridge Racer
      Shinobido 2: Tales of the Ninja
      Touch My Katamari
      Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3
      Uncharted: Golden Abyss
      Virtua Tennis 4: World Tour Edition
      Wipeout 2048
      Tales of Innocence R
      A-men
      Ragnarok Odyssey
      Gravity Rush
      Sumioni: Demon Arts
      FIFA Football
      Rayman Origins
      ModNation Racers: Road Trip
      Lumines Electronic Symphony
      Hustle Kings
      Escape Plan
      Dynasty Warriors Next
      Super Stardust Delta
      Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward
      Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack
      Ben 10: Galactic Racing
      Reality Fighters
      Ninja Gaiden Sigma Plus
      MotorStorm: RC
      Plants vs. Zombie
      Top Darts
      MLB 12: The Show
      Lego Harry Potter: Years 5–7
      Unit 13
      Little Busters! Converted Edition

      Your move, Sony

      • by neokushan (932374)

        The interesting thing is that this does actually give certain known PSP/PS3 hackers the power to remove ANY game from the PSN. All they have to do is say "New exploit found in x" and poof, it's gone. Sony isn't removing these games when the exploit is released, they're removing them as soon as it's mentioned what game it is.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:55AM (#39495959)

    If so.....then they did the right thing and I don't see the problem here.

    If, on the other hand, they just never put them back up and don't refund the people who purchased these games.....then there's a problem.

    • by Aladrin (926209)

      I agree.

      But Sony's an information black-hole, and they never tell you anything before it's finished.

    • They don't inform their costumers, that's a problem (although not a major one).
      Also, they didn't have to take down the game. Just stop selling it and patch the download whenever they please.

    • they did the right thing

      How many times do we have to have locked down platforms that you do not really "own" (in the sense of being able to use your computer without first getting the permission of whoever built it) before we finally realize that the wrong thing was creating another such platform in the first place? Why do we need Sony's permission to play a game on a computer that Sony sold us?

      The right thing would have been selling a system that does not need to be attacked just to use without Sony's permission.

      • by tepples (727027)

        The right thing would have been selling a system that does not need to be attacked just to use without Sony's permission.

        Such systems exist, with names like GP32, GP2X, GP2X Wiz, Dingoo, Caanoo, etc. But apart from Android smartphones, which have two critical disadvantages that I've mentioned several times before, these systems never appear to reach retailers' shelves in the United States, nor do they appear to get any support from mainstream video game publishers.

  • In the case of 'Everybody's Tennis', the game was removed from the PSN worldwide after the modder community bragged about the game being exploitable but before any exploit was released for it.

    Oh, well in that case, every game I don't like is exploitable. Your move Sony.

  • Oh boy... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:56AM (#39495977)
    Here come all the OMG SONY SUCKS people.
    Guys, they're a company out to make profit, and they're going to put the game back up in time.
    ANY company would do the same thing if suddenly they're product they were expecting revenue from was suddenly able to be accessed for free.
    I'm not discounting that Sony does a lot of scummy stuff, but is not one of them in my eyes.

    I'm going to take such a huge karma hit for this comment, how dare I go against the flow.
    • Guys, they're a company out to make profit, and they're going to put the game back up in time.

      In your dreams. The only thing they will do is, after some ten games or so, they'll stop pulling games just because some modder bragged about them "being exploitable". Maybe earlyer if bloggers overdo it, and brag about too many games at once. Maybe later if the bloggers are smart and wait a couple of weeks between each different game...

    • Re:Oh boy... (Score:4, Interesting)

      by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:26AM (#39496347)

      Guys, they're a company out to make profit, and they're going to put the game back up in time.

      Kind of like how Apple still has all those pornography apps in its app store? Sometimes companies think that can realize greater profits by basically screwing their customers, and there is every reason to think that Sony is such a company.

      I'm not discounting that Sony does a lot of scummy stuff, but is not one of them in my eyes.

      So just hearing a rumor that a particular game might have a bug that could be exploited is now enough to pull the game? Interesting definition of "not scummy..."

      • So just hearing a rumor that a particular game might have a bug that could be exploited is now enough to pull the game? Interesting definition of "not scummy..."

        FTFA:

        On March 1, the hackers at Wololo.net first publicly announced that their homebrew Vita Half Byte Loader (VHBL) worked by exploiting a vulnerability in a downloadable copy of the PSP title Motorstorm: Arctic Edge, releasing a video of Doom being loaded onto the system by way of proof

        I'd say it's called a fact if they provided proof. Sony probably tested it themselves before taking the games down.

    • by liquidsin (398151)

      well, this is slashdot so i guess it's gotta be car analogy time...

      you bought a brand new Chevrolet off the lot; sales guy says "just make your way out the lot and talk to Dave, he'll have your new car waiting for you". you go out to the lot to find Dave standing there without your new car. he says "oooh, sorry, there was just a recall on that model. we'll get it to you just as soon as we've fixed the problem". so you start asking things like "when will that be?", "can i just get another car instead?" and "

  • by RichMan (8097) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @09:57AM (#39495995)

    Sony is educating millions on the power of Digital Rights Management (DRM). The more educated, informed and angry people we have the better.

    I am sure Sony's licensing agreement says "Sony does not have to provide anything for your money". I would love to see the lawsuits flame up over this. Of course the agreement will also say "contests to the agreement must happen in East Texas(or whichever jurisdiction is most favorable to Sony)" and that that the customer waives the right to class actions lawsuits.

    If you are being shafted by Sony on this sorry, see if you can get a class action lawsuit going and buts that "customer (dis)agreement. If you are not being shafted by Sony, lets thank Sony for the education on DRM it is providing to a wide range of the public.

    • I'm not sure what this story has to say about DRM... Sony did not remove the game from peoples' devices from what I understand, just stopped selling it in their store. If that's severe DRM then DAMN Nintendo and Sony! Their horrible DRM on their Nintendo Entertainment System and Sega Master System has cause me not to be able to buy the original games anymore!

      DRM is an important topic to rally against, removing items from a store for not good reasons is something we should rally against. We should not c
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:01AM (#39496051)

    I can't imagine why Sony would possibly have a corporate culture of paranoia regarding security issues.

  • And yet again (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Pi1grim (1956208) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:01AM (#39496059)

    Way to go Sony, that ought to teach those pesky customers of yours!

    Actually, I think Stallman should thank Sony for reenacting every scary story he is telling when explaining horrors of verdor lock-ins and proprietary format traps. This ought to stick it to those, who kept saying that no company would be suicidal enough to treat their customers this way.

  • by mrpacmanjel (38218) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:05AM (#39496099)

    Wow! Back in the day (70s-80s) Sony made some cool stuff - I'm talking about Trinitron tvs, open-reel tape machines and awesome stereos. The quality was amazing. A popular "rule-of-thumb" was you can gauge the quality of a CRT-based telly was how heavy it was - Sony was always heaviest!!!! Until some competitors were caught adding lead(?) weights into the tv box!!

    Sony is a sad shadow of it's former self.

    Well done Sony you are on the road to utter irrelevance.

  • If hackers are saying a game is exploitable Sony would have to be insane to leave the exploit up on their store. Why would they expose themselves to an exploit? So they've taken it down presumably with the intention of fixing whatever the exploit is before putting it back up. Perhaps Everyone's Tennis does something such as peer to peer gameplay or hitting an external url which leaves it vulnerable to an exploit.
  • Piracy destroyed the PSP software market. Sony should do everything possible to avoid that with the Vita and every other Sony platform.

    It's not like Sony haters on Slashdot or any other pro-piracy site would ever say anything good about Sony. There's no sense in trying to appeal to people who actively seek to harm you. Hostile enemies should be treated like hostile enemies.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Piracy destroyed the PSP software market.

      Crap hardware, the usual Sony bullshit with weird Sony proprietary formats (UMDs? Really?) and lack of decent software killed the PSP. It wasn't very good. People were not interested. They did not buy a PSP. QED.

    • Hostile enemies should be treated like hostile enemies.

      Or in Sony's case....

      Paying Customers should be treated like hostile enemies.

  • by mrpacmanjel (38218) on Wednesday March 28, 2012 @10:16AM (#39496253)

    Expensive mobile device and overzealous company policy..oh proprietary format too.

    The device flopped over Christmas here in the UK & retailers were desperately promoting special offers and discounts as soon as it was released.

    Sony & Nintendo have to learn the mobile gaming sector has got a lot more competitive and in most cases competitor's games are cheaper too.

    I'm afraid this business model is done.

    I thought "Honeybadger" was stoopid. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4r7wHMg5Yjg [youtube.com]

    • by tepples (727027)

      Sony & Nintendo have to learn the mobile gaming sector has got a lot more competitive

      What's the competing product that works well with video games in genres where a gamepad works much better than a flat touch screen? Or when will developers become able to expect their customers to have bought a $62 Bluetooth gamepad?

  • As much as possible. Mainly when it comes to the Internet and software. The ONLY Sony products I will consider buying is something like a blue-ray player or home theater sound system. Possible even a TV but there are better TVs out there made by other companies for less $$. Stay away from the music, movies & game systems/software IMO.

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