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Open Source Games

The Liberated Pixel Cup: a Game Making Contest From the CC, FSF, and OpenGameArt 53

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-your-game-face-on dept.
Lendrick writes "OpenGameArt.org, the Free Software Foundation, and the Creative Commons are teaming up to bring the Liberated Pixel Cup, a free-as-in-freedom game making contest starting on June 1st and going through July 31st. The contest will be divided into two phases: the first phase will be about adding on to a consistent set of art commissioned specially for the contest, and the second phase, starting on July 1st, will be about building games using the provided art."
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The Liberated Pixel Cup: a Game Making Contest From the CC, FSF, and OpenGameArt

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  • by danwiz (538108) on Wednesday April 11, 2012 @02:07PM (#39647049)
    Two pixels ... one cup?

    A two-phase art competition?

    >> the first phase will be about adding ...
    >> the second phase ... using


    I'm seeing way too many similarities for comfort.

    • I'm the one who coined the name, and yes... it's been pointed out already: http://evan.status.net/notice/1367418 [status.net]

      Two free culture non-profit foundations, one cup.

      I have a good sense of humor about it, though. :)

  • I can't tell if all submitted art must be fantasy/steampunk based (as they comment in their blog post as their "base theme"), or if thats just their own contribution and others are free to submit whatever themed content they want?
    • Hi! You're welcome to submit in whatever thematic style you like (steampunk, fantasy, zombie office attack) as long as it matches the style guide (perspective, lighting, etc). We'll have that out soon. I'd love to have a lot of variety in content!
      • by Bram Stolk (24781)

        The lighting in your example is inconsistent.
        The trees have shadows straight below.
        The house has the light coming from the left.

  • ... when is the release date and where can I buy it from?
    • Not sure how serious you are, but as in terms of "dates" the contest dates are set in the rules: http://lpc.opengameart.org/content/lpc-rules [opengameart.org]

      And if you want to "buy it"... well you can donate to us here [fsf.org]! :)

      • by mitzampt (2002856)
        Well you blew my funny remark, but it's ok. Thank you. You realize that when the games are ready and the word gets out people will try to buy it, until they find them advertised as free. FSF is an example of civic sense in the global village, it's a shame that so few get it. I'm looking forward to see the results.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      It's an opensource game, you only have to buy support for it.

  • But I believe the 32x32 tile size is the same for RPG Maker. Regardless, like the contest says, these tiles could work in a variety of genres and its exciting to see more art become available from the community!

  • It feels almost like the concept of 'Free' has gone to the other side of the spectrum in that it is also very restrictive in how it can be used. I have read through the OpenGameArt FAQ and one example is that- if someone's art they're providing is licensed as GPL, then the code must ALSO be licensed as GPL. At first I thought that possibly the license would only apply to modifying and redistributing just the art itself, but I find the idea that using specific assets dictates how you produce your project t
    • by Anonymous Coward

      So don't use their free art. Make your own.

      The game does not have to only run on free-platforms, but has to run on them as well. There is no point to a FREE game that requires non-FREE software to run it.

    • by Lendrick (314723) on Wednesday April 11, 2012 @02:31PM (#39647451) Homepage Journal

      Just want to set the record straight on a couple of things:

      The FSF considers art to be non-functional data that does not trigger the GPL's linking requirement:

      Data that has an aesthetic purpose, rather than a functional one, may be included in a free system distribution as long as its license gives you permission to copy and redistribute, both for commercial and non-commercial purposes. For example, there are some game engines that have been released under the GNU GPL, and have accompanying game information—a world map, game graphics, and so on—released under such a verbatim distribution license. This kind of data can be part of a free system distribution.

      Source: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-system-distribution-guidelines.html [gnu.org]

      Secondly, the art will be dual licensed as CC-BY-SA, so even if you happen to not like the GPL, you need not use the art under that license. Also, while the contest requires your art to be CC-BY-SA and GPL for the sake of consistency, you are also entirely free to license it under a less restrictive license as well.

      Finally, your assertion that the game has to run only on a 100% free platform is false. Your game can run on any platforms you want it to. It's just that those platforms must include a 100% free platform.

      We don't want to restrict what you do with your code and art. However, we do have a set of standards for entry -- as long as those standards are met, you can do anything you want with your work.

      • by Moosader (1410323)

        Just want to set the record straight on a couple of things:

        The FSF considers art to be non-functional data that does not trigger the GPL's linking requirement:

        Data that has an aesthetic purpose, rather than a functional one, may be included in a free system distribution as long as its license gives you permission to copy and redistribute, both for commercial and non-commercial purposes. For example, there are some game engines that have been released under the GNU GPL, and have accompanying game information—a world map, game graphics, and so on—released under such a verbatim distribution license. This kind of data can be part of a free system distribution.

        Source: http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-system-distribution-guidelines.html [gnu.org]

        Secondly, the art will be dual licensed as CC-BY-SA, so even if you happen to not like the GPL, you need not use the art under that license. Also, while the contest requires your art to be CC-BY-SA and GPL for the sake of consistency, you are also entirely free to license it under a less restrictive license as well.

        Finally, your assertion that the game has to run only on a 100% free platform is false. Your game can run on any platforms you want it to. It's just that those platforms must include a 100% free platform.

        We don't want to restrict what you do with your code and art. However, we do have a set of standards for entry -- as long as those standards are met, you can do anything you want with your work.

        I was just referencing someone else's comment that made it sound like it had to be on a 100% free platform. I didn't see a comment it was responding to, so I didn't know if it was out of context. I am glad to find out that the art does not affect your software license; the FAQ page for OGA made it sound like this was the case.

  • This could yield something amazing. Even if this round will comply with Richard Stallman's increasingly delusional understanding of free software, the results should be interesting to watch. This competition is unbiased enough also to merit the interest of the conventional video games industry and may be a way for new talent to make itself known. I think more importantly, though, this will again demonstrate the truly open source gaming is a very viable concept.

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