Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
PC Games (Games) Games

Valve Will Let Gamers Pick Games To Appear On Steam 129

Posted by Soulskill
from the looking-forward-to-more-games-about-hats dept.
Valve has announced a new system called Greenlight, which will allow the gaming community to select which games get chosen for distribution via Steam. Developers will post information about their games — this can be screenshots and videos, or even concepts and potential game mechanics for titles still in development. Once posted, the Steam community will be able to vote on which ones are the best. This will prioritize which games become available on Steam first. Greenlight is Valve's attempt to solve what they call an "intractable problem" — figuring out ahead of time what games players will like. They also hope to facilitate the development of interesting games. "We think it's going to encourage this virtuous development cycle. The problem we had of, how do we encourage somebody when they're not done developing yet? This we think will work. We think a bunch of people will be looking at it going, 'oh my gosh, I want that.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Valve Will Let Gamers Pick Games To Appear On Steam

Comments Filter:
  • Okay then (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kat_skan (5219) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @02:08PM (#40605757)

    I pick Episode 3.

    • I pick Episode 3.

      The developer has to submit it first...

      (besides, Valve can't count to 3)

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I pick Episode 3.

        The developer has to submit it first...

        (besides, Valve can't count to 3)

        Well, alright, then. I pick Episode Many.

    • by kiriath (2670145)

      This * 10000

    • I pick Episode 3.

      I thought LEGO Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith was already on Steam, as part of the VI-pack [steampowered.com].

    • by Shadowhawk (30195)
      This ^
    • by TechwoIf (1004763)
      "Episode 3" of what? I did goggle it and it pointed to a dozen things this phrase could refer to.
    • by hairyfeet (841228)
      Hell why don't you wish for an Alyson Hannigan sexbot delivered to you in a flying car? both are about as fricking likely.
  • Basing this on the fact that there are quite a few rather lame games on steam, I'd say this is welcome. I'd vote!

    • by magarity (164372)

      I'd rather have it the other way around; how do I vote to get a game OFF Steam? I bought a game on retail DVD and missed the fine print on the spine that said Steam was required. The miserable thing had to go through a huge download despite the DVD and it always wants to be connected to log in to the Steam account to play in single player mode. Highly irritating!

      • Just put steam into Offline mode. Problem solved.
  • 1) Kickstarter effect, developers can see what the fans are craving and can use it to get funding.

    2) "Hey, don't blame us. You picked it!"

    • Re: 2

      Valve wants to squeeze the absolute maximum money from steam users. Don't forget.

    • 3- Try to limit the Desura success with all those indie games and alpha-funding projects. It it grows too much, it might eat some of the steam market

      for me Desura already own my loyalty, they build the linux support first and have many fun games and have a open source client...

      aahhh!!, what competition can do! everyone wins!! :)

  • What makes their problem intractable? What is the marginal cost of publishing a game on Steam, once that game is fully produced and (presumably) ready to be sold on a DVD/BD? If their business process or technology makes it's very expensive to publish via Steam such that they have to go through an editorial process to insure highly salable content, then I think the problem is not with the editorial process but the underlying publishing technology/process.

    Perhaps I don't understand the intricacies; how is

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Publishing angry birds onto the Apple store is easy because apple has a dedicated team to sift through the crap from the cream. This also leads to Apple favouritism in apps and makes publishing very luck of the draw. Valve wants the neat, tidy, clean environment Apple products have, but without all the politics and costs. Even the Google play store has a minimal approval process. Valve does not want to hire a team, lest that be another expense and essentially hold them liable for review and what makes it.

      So

      • by KhabaLox (1906148)

        The filtering that Apple is doing is simply to prevent malware and pornography from entering the App Store. They aren't selecting Angry Birds in favor of Contented Birds because the latter is a shitty, boring game that no one will buy.

        This Greenlight idea won't prevent malware from entering the Steam marketplace (Valve still needs to do a QA check for that), and if anything it will increase the pornographic games available.

        • Apple absolutely claim they will reject apps because they're shit. They in fact do reject apps that are just websites loaded in a webview, or that are nothing but marketing material, or are inferior clones of apps of a type that are already numerous in the store (the way they put it is something like "we have enough fart apps, thank you"). They also reject apps with obvious bugs, or that just work very poorly.

          That's not to say there aren't examples of all of those things that make it through, but if you t

      • by Baloroth (2370816)

        Publishing angry birds onto the Apple store is easy because apple has a dedicated team to sift through the crap from the cream. This also leads to Apple favouritism in apps and makes publishing very luck of the draw. Valve wants the neat, tidy, clean environment Apple products have, but without all the politics and costs. Even the Google play store has a minimal approval process. Valve does not want to hire a team, lest that be another expense and essentially hold them liable for review and what makes it.

        So they developed an intelligent solution: they don't have to hire a team that sifts through and decide what looks good, the users do. They aren't liable for what makes it on their, its up to the developer. They aren't directing games, they aren't influencing game production, its straight on just being a conduit between gamers and developers, for a smaller cost than hiring people to manage that connection.

        Valve does have a team for this, and they still will (since the community is most certainly not 100% reliable). I'm still slightly uncertain what the point of Greenlight is, but I imagine Valve probably got contacted by angry developers/fans screaming "why is x game not on Steam?!?!?" This helps to solve that issue. Now they can point to Greenlight and say "well, it either isn't on there or doesn't have enough people who want it on Steam. You want it on Steam? Fix those problems." Boom, problem solved for V

    • by jmerlin (1010641) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @05:19PM (#40608145)
      It would probably have more to do with the legal issues and that a game developer must allow Steam to have digital distribution rights and quite an incredibly powerful license to the software. You see, Valve doesn't sell games on Steam. They sell subscriptions to a license to a game. Valve owns the licenses, you own a very limited subscription to that license, and it affords you no rights under law, and it can be terminated at Valve's discretion for any reason or no reason. To distribute a game under that framework, I presume there's legal footwork to be done, and to do that for EVERY SINGLE GAME ANYONE EVER MADE, EVER would be an intractable problem indeed. If you go into it with a publisher saying "our customers want this game" and they deal with the legal issues up front, customers get games they want and Valve has less legal work to do.

      I still say nobody should ever buy a game from Steam again. The reason they can sell games at 80% off is because you never actually own a copy of any game purchased through Steam, so you're literally paying Valve to let you play in their sandbox; at the end of the day, you have to go home, and all the toys stay with Valve. This is the most anti-consumer system I could imagine; complete and total dismissal of all consumer rights.
      • by DrGamez (1134281)
        Yes but it's a really well designed sand-box that is open virtually 24/7 and has all these neat features that really enhance the entire idea of sand. I can have friend lists, achievements, screenshots, video replays, join communities, keep up to date with the sand castles all my friends are making, be able to play with that sand in any box I install in any house, and they make sure all the sand stays patched without me having to ask for it.

        (And if all the cards and moons align just right I can take that s
        • by jmerlin (1010641)
          All of this can be provided while using software that is licensed to the buyer, not to Valve. Steam can also in that case implement a market for used game licenses. The reason Valve doesn't do this is because they believe they will make more money if you never own a copy of a game and that nobody else can ever purchase your used copy (you have to buy it fresh from Steam or trade an unbound game). One could very easily re-implement all of Steam's features for these games without the draconian and probably
          • by DrGamez (1134281)
            I guess if by your admission, all definitions of "greed" are indeed "evil" then yes - I don't think there is anything I could say to change that idea. I feel that our world is defined by shades of gray, so a company looking to make the maximum amount of money out of me doesn't have to be evil, they are just trying to make a maximum amount of money out of me as I imagine you're trying to make the maximum amount of value out of your products.

            They don't "feel" evil, and that feeling goes a very long way in w
            • by jmerlin (1010641)
              They start to feel evil the first time you buy a game on Steam that is unplayable. Their answer: "too bad." The last time I bought a game in a store that didn't work, I got a refund or a replacement, my choice.

              And to your point about profit, it has never been demonstrated that disallowing sales of used copies reduces profit. Just as it has never been proved that piracy actually impacts the sales of copyrighted material. The fashion industry doesn't get copyright protection, and they stand by the argu
  • Linux (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Taibhsear (1286214) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @02:38PM (#40606147)

    Can we vote to prioritize Linux versions? I'm sure the Apple guys would like a button to prioritize games (that already exist on steam) to get OSX versions as well.

    • by subanark (937286)

      Part of the requirement of being on Greenlight is that your game must support Windows. If you want to make it a selling point that it also supports Max OS (and linux once steam adds that) you are free to do so.

  • by GrumpySteen (1250194) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @03:07PM (#40606551)

    I look forward to seeing the first games featuring Pedobear and/or Goatse.

    • by yodleboy (982200)
      I hope not. Still, it will be interesting to see how many of the people that vote "yes" to a game end up purchasing it when/if it appears on Steam. Lots of games look promising, then fail to deliver. Just because a lot of people said "get it on Steam" doesn't mean I'm going to skip reviews.

      I think where this process could really shine is with older back catalog games. I'd bet plenty of publishers would love to release older games and milk them a little longer, but there's a good chance the cost of doin
    • by DrGamez (1134281)
      I've seen this a few times now but I don't understand how people will think a lot of "joke games" will be submitted to the Greenlight process. This seems like kind of a Big Deal, letting users decide the company's potential cash flow, so why would they just allow literally ANY game onto it? Do these people think Valve will just release Greenlight and then never look at the process again, allowing whatever porn/hate game to be submitted?
      • Hint: I wasn't being literal. I was pointing out that what's most popular tends to be the lowest common denominator. Look at top 40 radio if you need further evidence.

  • by Dunge (922521)
    What was wrong with the previous method of having ALL games available?
    • by DrGamez (1134281)
      All games are not available, they can only vet and look through so many games - there is a backlog of games they need to approve, that is the whole purpose of this. They can't just say "everyone gets in!" they have to have some kind of process.
  • Why the need to limit it? Just only feature the good ones prominently.
    • It can bring them into lots of trouble in selling disturbing, obscene and pornographic material. Also, their reputation is pretty stellar, so they wouldn't really want to get it stained.
  • It would be interesting if this could be leveraged to enable boycotting of games that are slated to use nasty drm or are made by less liked companies. I doubt it would end up seriously happening, but it would be interesting to see how things go, if all games go through this for initial approval. The vocal people tend to be those with strong opinions, after all.
  • It's about damn time... My first vote goes for No Time to Explain. [tinybuildgames.com]
    Which is a Kickstarter funded game that's better in quality and humour than many games on Steam, but was rejected for some unknown reason -- I can only assume the Steam folks are intractable morons: This game is awesome, and I know of many indie devs with the same story, "Everyone likes my game, except Steam reviewers." I've met folks who only buy games if they are on Steam, I've also met folks who only shop at Walmart... Neither situat

    • by westlake (615356)

      This game is awesome, and I know of many indie devs with the same story, "Everyone likes my game, except Steam reviewers."

      The mother is not always the best judge of the child.

  • Vendetta Online!!!!
    3d first person space combat(a la freelancer/xwing series/etc) MMO that runs on windows, mac, linux, and android tablets? Heck yeah.

  • Great idea but it assumes customers know what they want...

Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip around the Sun.

Working...