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Notch Won't Certify Minecraft For Windows 8 303

Posted by timothy
from the taking-a-stand dept.
MojoKid writes "The backlash against Windows 8 from various developers continues, but this time a game's creator isn't just expressing discontent. Notch, the developer behind smash hit Minecraft, has declared that he won't be working with Microsoft to certify Minecraft for Windows 8. Note that this doesn't mean Minecraft won't run on Windows 8. The certification process in question is Microsoft's mandatory rules for submitting content to the Windows game store. In order to be listed there, an application must be Metro-compatible and conform to a laundry list of other conditions. The real problem with Windows 8 is that it locks ARM users into a second class experience. If you buy an x86 tablet, you can download programs from SourceForge, GitHub, or any file mirror. If you're an ARM user, you can download programs from the Microsoft store and that's it. The bifurcated permission structure is the problem, and it makes WinRT tablets categorically impossible to recommend for anyone who values the ability to install whatever software they please."
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Notch Won't Certify Minecraft For Windows 8

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  • Well... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by p0p0 (1841106) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:30AM (#41498053)
    Windows being Windows, I don't forsee any real future issues with getting your own apps on the ARM version. Just the nature of Windows will probably make it much easier to work around, and if the userbase grows enough it will move along that much faster. Microsoft is trying the walled garden technique the Apple has going, but I don't foresee it being as effective or foolproof as Apple's.

    Sometimes I feel like Microsoft si kind of flopping around like a fish on land when it comes to tablets. Even though they technically had a headstart, they've only just started their move to tablets and it feels rushed. The current release cycle of good > bad > good > bad will most likely continue and Windows 8 will flop. At least I hope it does and it will force them to rethink their stupid Start menu removal, amongst other things.
    • At least I hope it does and it will force them to rethink their stupid Start menu removal, amongst other things.

      Yes, I agree that It's a bit pissy of microsoft to drop the friggin start menu after all these years without any kind of transition period -- or with anything that has an ounce of useability in it.

      There is a 3rd party program that adds the start menu back to the taskbar, http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/ [stardock.com]

      Just a happy user (note: it's a tad buggy when it comes to opening files from ju

      • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

        I would recommend Launchy [launchy.net] for a different experience. I don't have to go near "All Programs," and only rarely need to open the Start Menu at all these days. Most beautifully, it rapidly learns your shortcuts so even if you install something that's a better match for what you've typed, you still get the program you expected.
    • by arisvega (1414195)

      Microsoft is trying the walled garden technique the Apple has going, but I don't foresee it being as effective or foolproof as Apple's.

      That. I like it when I read a story's description, go to the comments, and the first post is almost exactly what I had in mind: that's the insightful Slashdot I enjoy.

      So this is what I believe this news is about: Microsoft wanting in on some of that Apple-flavoured enchantment of which the necessary ingredient is simultaneous control (or at least influence during the making of) on both software and hardware. I believe Notch is merely a catalyst here (albeit a potent one), since Minecraft's enormous success

      • by Threni (635302)

        > since Minecraft's enormous success with essentially zero advertizing through mainstream channels, the
        > innovative way Mojang is run and his 33 years of age has made him one of the most closely monitored players
        > in the field.

        No, it's just the success of the game that matters. If it had been as successful bu thad advertising, was run differently and the guy was older/younger and there'd be no difference. If the game had bombed then all that other stuff wouldn't have made it any more interesting

    • by JanneM (7445)

      "I don't forsee any real future issues with getting your own apps on the ARM version. "

      Why would a developer bother with an ARM version, though? With all the restrictions and the high likelihood that most users will be on X86, it doesn't look like a good way to spend your resources.

      • There might be far more consumers with the ARM version as it is cheaper. Businesses may get the x86 version for compatibility but some apps like games are bought by more consumers.
    • Given the moves towards walled gardens by both MS and Apple, I am making my own moves towards open or more open platforms. Debian laptop. XBMC set-top box with linux. Android phone. Possibly a linux tablet. And I am encouraging the same from those around me. Open computing is too important to lose.

    • Re:Well... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968&gmail,com> on Saturday September 29, 2012 @04:28PM (#41501253) Journal

      While I agree Windows without the ability to run Windows programs is fucking POINTLESS what's sad is everybody getting their panties in a wad about "ZOMFG WinRT won't be able to download anywhere but the appstore....just like Apple, which everybody camps out around the block to buy ZOMFG!" oh the irony is thick and juicy when it comes to everyone having a fit over THAT.

      What I wanna ask this guy is "Where the FUCK were you man when Apple was pulling the very same shit? I was pointing out it was a walled garden and sucked ass and wouldn't have their products for free because of it, where are YOUR complaints and pledges not to buy Apple Notch?"

      Double standards are double standards and this is NO different than what Apple does, and considering that pretty much the entire Ballmer tenure as head of MSFT has been to see what Apple does and then copy it poorly (Zune,Kin,Sidekick) is this REALLY surprising that they would ape the living shit out of Apple? After all Apple is the biggest company in the world, people just throw money at them and their appstore, why shouldn't MSFT ape somebody that makes money?

      If you don't like the MSFT appstore please, join with me in not buying anything WinRT. But at least have the honor and decency of not being a hypocrite and boycott all Apple products that likewise use a locked down appstore as well. I hereby pledge that I Hairyfeet will NEVER own a WinPhone, WinTab,iPhone, or iPad. Not if you were to give it to me , not if I can buy one and get one free, I will not take them on a boat, I will not take them with a goat, I will not take appstores in a can, I will NOT take them Sam I am!

    • Re:Well... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Waccoon (1186667) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @05:46PM (#41501773)

      Just because you can hack around a policy doesn't mean that policy should be widely accepted. I don't want my support status, or even legal status, reduced to blind luck.

      You can crack a game to get it to run properly and hardly anyone will know, but if a business starts getting in involved with hacks and tricks just to get their damn software to function, they could be staring into a potential lawsuit... provided they're unlucky enough to get caught.

      I get really pissed when people say walled gardens aren't a big deal because it's wicked easy to get around them. Of course they're a big deal... to certain types of people. Some people are unlucky enough to get slapped with million dollar lawsuits because they got caught downloading a file. If 99.9% of people don't get caught, does that mean it's not a big deal if that small percentage practically have their lives destroyed by chance? Will the majority still stick up for the rights of the minority, or is it every person for himself?

      How to get around the policy is not the problem. The policy is the problem, and people certainly should be more vocal about it.

  • You would think (Score:5, Informative)

    by wbr1 (2538558) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:33AM (#41498069)
    That Ballmer would understand that a large portion of windows past success was due in part to the fact that software for the system was available anywhere. Now upon porting to a new platform, he wants to emulate apples walled garden, which only worked because of vendor lock in and the desirbility of the device. It won't work. Android is proving that an open market gains more market share. With at least 3 other options (iOS, Android, and regular windows), users will likely stick with those platforms unless tricked or forced, and MS doesnt have the power in the mobile market to force.
    So now there are at least 2 aspects of Win8 that should fail, the interface, and the locked down ARM version
    Disclaimer: Sent from android phone.
    • Re:You would think (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:50AM (#41498157)

      I'm an indie game developer. I'll compile and test on Win XP, Vista, Win7 (besides Mac, Linux & Android -- hell, I've got an experimental BSD branch), but I am boycotting Windows 8, including the x86 version expressly because of the ARM version.

      I'd rather only release on Android and other Linux boxen (and go back to construction laborer part time) than encourage anyone, especially MS, that a locked down operating system is OK. (Note: iOS isn't up there -- It's dead to me)

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Great less competition!

        As an indie developer, Windows 8's app store is a boon.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by westlake (615356)

        I'm an indie game developer. I am boycotting Windows 8, including the x86 version expressly because of the ARM version.

        iOS isn't up there -- It's dead to me.

        I'll be blunt here and say that this isn't how the professional developer --- the for-profit enterprise --- looks at their potential markets.

        The Linux developer who touts the convenience and safety of his distro's repository isn't in a position to complain when other operating systems move in the same direction.

        The trusted OS-branded app store has become the norm in mobile.

        The geek may side-load from other sources, but you are not going to pay the light bill and the rent serving that crowd. The number

        • Re:You would think (Score:5, Insightful)

          by MattJD (1020453) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @11:19AM (#41498883)

          The Linux developer who touts the convenience and safety of his distro's repository isn't in a position to complain when other operating systems move in the same direction.

          I have absolutely no problem with app stores having a curated listing of items. Its when that stores is the only method I can get software I have an issue. That's why I don't mind Google's Play Store (for apps), while its the default on my phone I can easily enable side-loading of apps on to it.

          And that's exactly how my Linux distro's work as well ...

          • There are actually ways to sideload apps on Win8, they're just not as straightforward and prominent as "Allow other app sources" checkbox on Android.

            See, Win8 is somewhat different from iOS/Android in that to write apps for it, you have to run your developer tools on it - at least for the time being. Which in turn means that there has to be a way to deploy and run a freshly compiled app when you're developing one. And sure it is - the OS will let you do just that when you have a developer license activated

          • by westlake (615356)

            And that's exactly how my Linux distro's work as well ...

            If a program isn't packaged for your distribution, how easy will be for anyone but the true blue Linux geek to install it --- or even to discover that it exists?

            Ubuntu developers set as a goal:

            "...there should be one obvious mechanism for installing, removing, and updating software in Ubuntu, with a self-evident name and an interface anyone can use. There should be a coordinated system for developers and enthusiasts to improve the usefulness of descriptions and other metadata for software packages. The software updates interface should be honed to maximize the voluntary installation of updates across the millions of computers on which Ubuntu is installed. And projects and vendors whose software is packaged for Ubuntu should be encouraged to provide links to their software's presence in the Software Store, instead of command-line installation instructions.

            Ubuntu Software Center [wikipedia.org]

            This reads equally well as a mission statement for the the Kindle, Android smartphone, Win 8 tablet, and the iOS mobile device.

            It is only a half-step away from an admission that the "obvious" mechanism --- the increasingly familiar, easy to use and trusted app store --- is about to become the most significant --- perhaps t

        • by Microlith (54737)

          The Linux developer who touts the convenience and safety of his distro's repository isn't in a position to complain when other operating systems move in the same direction.

          This sentiment is incorrect, and I'll let you figure out why.

          The geek may side-load from other sources, but you are not going to pay the light bill and the rent serving that crowd.

          You may not, but what do you get from attacking them like Apple and Microsoft do?

    • Re:You would think (Score:5, Insightful)

      by wisnoskij (1206448) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:31AM (#41498353) Homepage

      This, 100 times this.
      Regardles of what gui you perfer or if you think Linux is a pile of crap or amazing, the main reason to use windows is because it has all the software and an OS is primarilly just a tool to run software.

    • Yes, Microsoft seems to forget that they absolutely destroyed Apple in the 90s... and that's because of the features Windows shared with Linux, not the features it shared with Apple. They are going in the exact wrong direction and will lose out big time. It's funny that it seems like the entire world knows what Microsoft should do, and yet Microsoft seems hell bent on not doing it.
      • I don't think they forgot that they won big in the 90's. They realize, however, that things are different in the portable market. Apple won big against Microsoft with music players, phones and tablets. And their notebooks are doing extremely well compared to historic marketshare. It is wise not to treat ARM tablets like Intel desktops and 2012 like 1992.
    • by MightyYar (622222)

      That Ballmer would understand that a large portion of windows past success was due in part to the fact that software for the system was available anywhere.

      Agreed. I think there is room for someone to make money on the low-end (Walmart) as well as on the high-end (Tiffany). Just because Walmart's gross margins are low doesn't make them a bad investment.

      Android is proving that an open market gains more market share

      Android is a huge impediment for MS. MS can't charge for an OS and remain competitive with Android, which is free. This screws up their Windows model. I think they are fishing around for another model. Apple, at this point, still makes bucketloads of money on actual hardware - the walled garden money was almost

  • by Anonymous Coward

    nice software you have, shame if something was to happen to it (like scary warning dialogs)

    how anti-trust regulators are not all over this is a mystery

    • IANAL, but I think antitrust requires that you both (a) have a monopoly, and (b) use tying to extend your monopoly into new areas.

      My guess is that because MS doesn't have a monopoly on the tablet market in general, extending their control over the OS into control over app distribution, on their platform only, isn't antitrust.

      • by Nerdfest (867930)

        Microsoft are locking anything under their 'Metro' interface to their software store for *all* platforms, as I understand it. It is absolutely abusing their monopoly. Apple has made it acceptable enough that it won't be questioned for a while.

  • by gravyface (592485) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:44AM (#41498121)
    Apple has a walled garden. That's it. Android does too. Microsoft has a walled garden, but if you have an x86 tablet, you can plant petunias and begonias if you want in there. That seems like an improvement to me. And it's likely a technical reason too: all those Windows-native calls/hooks that your typical Windows-compatible applications require likely do not exist on the ARM version of Windows 8 (I'm not a Windows programmer/guru, so I'm speculating here, but seems likely no?).
    • by Wattos (2268108) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:57AM (#41498189)

      Please explain how Android has a walled garden? Last time I checked I can install applications without using google play/market

      • by gravyface (592485) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:03AM (#41498209)
        Slashdot needs an edit feature. You're right. My bad. Had a different train of thought originally.
      • If you keep the little box "install from other sources" unchecked, then Android has a walled garden. You get the choice of a walled garden or not, which is fine, most people shouldn't be allowed to DL random stuff. Too bad the walls are not that good, BTW ^^

        • You get the choice of a walled garden or not...

          Walled Garden... heh heh heh. Giving Fido the man-slaughtering hell hound the abilty to doff his collar doesn't mean he's safely secured up either. A walled garden is not an "opt-in" feature. Install from other sources is just that, freedom.

      • by Blymie (231220)

        OK, that's it.

        If you people want to win the PR war, stop using the enemy's PR terms!

        It isn't a walled garden. NO WAY.

        That implies something wonderful and pleasant and beautiful and...

        Walled garden? Nope, it is a JAIL. Designed so you CAN NOT escape, and your free will is negated.

        Stop using their PR terms!

        (note: Wattos.. you just happened to be the dude I replied to. Nothing personal, everyone seems to be using the enemy's PR terms)

      • by mpe (36238)
        Please explain how Android has a walled garden? Last time I checked I can install applications without using google play/market.

        IIRC you can even divorce an Android device entirely from Google (something which can be especially desirable in the "Enterprise" market) far more easily than you can divorce an iOS device from Apple.
      • by jd2112 (1535857)
        Android has a walled garden but unlike Apple's there is a door labeled "Allow installation of non-market applications".
    • by LordLucless (582312) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:58AM (#41498193)

      Apple has a walled garden.

      Yes.

      Android does too.

      No

      Microsoft has a walled garden, but if you have an x86 tablet, you can plant petunias and begonias

      WTF?

    • "Apple has a walled garden.

      Apple and Microsoft are not in competition, since Microsoft doesn't make computers. That being said, people bought the land knowing there was a wall around the garden, and in many cases because it has a wall around it. They trust the realtor.

      "Android does too."

      No, it doesn't. It has a gate with an option to keep the gate locked, or to open it.

      Microsoft has a walled garden

      What computer does Microsoft make, again? Why do they get to lock my hardware down, when they don't even mak

  • by gravyface (592485) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:55AM (#41498173)
    Microsoft Windows native/legacy applications -- a massive massive software ecosystem unparalleled by any other OS/platform (besides the Web perhaps?) -- is the reason why they can never turn their backs on it. Its the key to their power, but with power comes a great responsibilit^H^H^H burden.

    They will try, but at the end of the day, the Microsoft walled garden will always have the gate left open.
  • by KiloByte (825081) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @08:56AM (#41498179)

    I'd say Microsoft shot itself in the foot here, not by enacting the walled garden (which is bad), but by not releasing a compat layer to run WinRT executables on earlier versions of i386/amd64 Windows.

    No one is really going to port stuff just for porting sake, and the API is quite different, with no obvious upsides. As for users, there are three groups:
    * Windows Phone 8: laughed at, and without software it's a chicken-and-egg problem
    * Windows 8 for business: no sane business is going to migrate for 5 or so years
    * Windows 8 for home users: they don't upgrade for the (non-existing) coolness factor but by getting Windows with replacement hardware

    Thus, the only real way to get actual users for WinRT software in the short term would be making it possible to run it on Windows 7 (and if they really cared, even XP). With no users, there will be no serious developers.

    • by obarthelemy (160321) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:10AM (#41498241)

      "the API is quite different, with no obvious upsides". Or not:

      obvious upsides to dropping some backward compatibility:
      - less OS bloat
      - faster OS
      - more battery life
      - fewer security holes
      - no significant loss of features aside from backward compatibility itself

      • by KiloByte (825081)

        I mean upsides for the developer. A less bloated OS is easier to maintain and might be milder on the battery, but doesn't make writing software for it any easier.

      • by bertok (226922) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @10:27AM (#41498623)

        no significant loss of features aside from backward compatibility itself

        That's a common misconception perpetuated by clever marketing, but it's flat out wrong.

        Metro/WinRT is not Win32 modernized, instead it is Silverlight 6 Tablet Edition.

        It's severely sandboxed, even more in some ways than Silverlight 5 was, which means that really important things that a lot of common applications require just Don't Work At All, and can't be made to work unless Microsoft relents and releases Windows 9 with a newer, more permissive API.

        To give you an idea of just how restricted Metro/WinRT apps are, they're prevented from communicating with Desktop apps and traditional local services. That means that there's no shared memory, no named pipes, no Windows event passing, not even "localhost" sockets! Really major things can't be done, like runtime code generation (JIT), which directly impacts applications like Firefox and Chrome. Statically compiling Java code may work for some apps, but not if dynamic class loading is required.

        Put yourself in the shoes of an Enterprise developer: Message Queues? Missing. LDAP? Nope. Background services? Blocked. Oracle client? Hah! Local database? Can't connect. Group Policy? Unavailable. PowerShell Integration? Desktop only.

        Try this from a games developer's perspective: OpenCL? No JIT. PhysX? Can't talk to the driver. OpenGL? Over Ballmer's dead body.

        • by tepples (727027)

          Try this from a games developer's perspective: OpenCL? No JIT. PhysX? Can't talk to the driver. OpenGL? Over Ballmer's dead body.

          But how is the situation on Windows RT devices worse than that on the Xbox 360?

  • by Richard_at_work (517087) <richardprice.gmail@com> on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:01AM (#41498199)

    If he isn't just trolling about Windows, and instead does want to make a point about the "value of being able to install your own software", why is there an official Minecraft client for iOS?

    Did he suddenly grow a pair because it's Microsoft?

    Or is he just more likely to take a stand using a platform which isn't likely to lose him any money if he stays away from it because of his views?

    I'm going to go with the last one...

    • by _xeno_ (155264)

      If he isn't just trolling about Windows, and instead does want to make a point about the "value of being able to install your own software", why is there an official Minecraft client for iOS?

      Hell, there's also a version for Xbox 360.

      Clearly, Notch has no problems releasing Minecraft on a Microsoft platform that restricts your ability to freely release software.

      • by robmv (855035)

        Both iOS and XBox are locked down from their inception. Notch is "boycotting" Windows 8 certification (Metro apps or whatever is called now and store") because it wasn't a locked down platform and is becoming one, don't know but Windows probably is his main platform and he don't want it to become like iOS

    • by SilenceBE (1439827) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:32AM (#41498357)
      The only way to distribute Metro apps (x86 or ARM) is via the Windows store. "Side loading" (with is just a funky name for installing Metro apps outside the windows store) is only available for Windows enterprise and server editions. See http://richfrombechtle.wordpress.com/tag/windows-8-sideloading/ [wordpress.com] or google for "sideloading windows 8"

      I don't know you guys that are talking about tablets got the memo that Windows 8 also (unfortunately) runs on the desktop.

      This is a path that goes a lot further then Apple as I'm still able to install software freely on my Apple desktop. With Windows also, but not the new Metro apps they are trying to push or I should run the enterprise version.
    • It is easy to be a "fighter" where little is on the line. I find it rather unlikely Windows 8 tablets will succeed so there's no harm in him snubbing them. That aside, if they do, he can always just release Minecraft for them. It isn't like MS is going to ban him, they don't give a shit.

      I also think it is just generally jumping on the "Hate MS" cause of the day. Hating on MS for the Windows Store is real popular right now with geek types. So he's just jumping on that, probably without doing much research on

    • by itsdapead (734413) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @10:08AM (#41498523)

      If he isn't just trolling about Windows, and instead does want to make a point about the "value of being able to install your own software", why is there an official Minecraft client for iOS?

      That did occur to me - but bear in mind that TFA consists of two tweets from Notch followed by an awful lot of extrapolation by HotHardware.com. His tweets don't mention ARM at all, just not wanting Microsoft to 'ruin the PC as an open platform'.

      I think the problem occures if you see devices like tablets, phones and consoles as 'media consumption' appliances rather than general purpose computers. It's no big deal if they are closed systems (consoles have been that way for years).

      The forthcoming ARM-based Windows machines may well be marketed as general purpose laptops and SFF computers.

  • And like all rock stars, it's "issue of the day" bandwagon for him. Where was he when MCraft got certified for Apple's AppStore ?

  • by amiga3D (567632) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @09:14AM (#41498265)

    Hey, I thought Apple held the patent on locking users into an app store? They should sue MicroSoft for patent infringement.

  • Another reason why this is a good news for ReactOS.
  • The real problem with Windows 8 is that it locks ARM users into a second class experience. If you buy an x86 tablet, you can download programs from SourceForge, GitHub, or any file mirror. If you're an ARM user, you can download programs from the Microsoft store and that's it.

    If that's the real problem with windows 8 then it's really not a problem at all, is it? Competing operating systems on mobile (android, ios) are also locked down to a single source out of the box unless you make changes to the OS.

    There are a LOT of problems with win8, but this isn't a biggie.

    • It is just anti-MS FUD, which is something Slashdot likes a lot.

      Windows 8 isn't a great desktop OS because it tries to force a tablet interface on you to replace the start menu (and the UI is ugly compared to 7), but ultimately it doesn't matter. You can replace that if you like (Start8 is my recommendation) and it still runs all Windows x86/x64 software just like past versions of Windows. It just also has the ability to run new Metro aka MS tablet, software which the previous Windows versions didn't. That

  • by strejf (2741849) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @10:39AM (#41498681)
    So Rafael Rivera made a blog post about this, claiming that Notch might have misunderstood why Microsoft contacted him. According to him all they asked Notch to do was to certify Minecraft so that it could be listed in the Windows 8 Store. Listed as in only displaying a link to www.minecraft.net. Nothing more, no app hosted by Microsoft or anything. Not converting Minecraft to an Metroapp. Just a link. I guess we don't know until Notch clears this up, but if it is true then this news article is wrong and most comments are wrong as well. http://www.withinwindows.com/2012/09/28/notch-doesnt-hate-windows-8-hes-just-confused/ [withinwindows.com]
  • Seriously, whether the desktop was available or not on Win RT ARM tablets, the experience would always be inferior. Saying that ARM users are getting a second rate experience is stupid. Have them install something that runs badly on their hardware, that's a second rate experience.

    What the Metro and MS store is allow developers to write across both architectures with ease. While a Metro app may appear that taxes an ARM tablet, that same app isn't going to break a sweat on a multicore x86 box.

    You may as wel
  • by Dan667 (564390) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @11:31AM (#41498949)
    so win8 certification is also just a money making scheme.
  • by Junta (36770) on Saturday September 29, 2012 @01:18PM (#41499721)

    I see two possibliities:
    MS is sufficiently deluded that they genuinely think doubling down on Silverlight based technology while forcing tighter lockin to MS store and services is going to work and lead to rapid obsolecence of their existing software ecosystem without anything of significance lost. This seems to fly against all evidence and reason, but I wouldn't put it past them.

    The other possibility is that WindowsRT isn't *that* serious an endeavor. Enough invested to make it *real* and maybe even take off in the unlikely scenario described above. Not enough to actually enable the large third-party application base that remains MS' sole meaningful advantage nowadays. The hope may be to scare AMD and Intel to worry more and work harder to provide compelling x86 compatible solutions amenable to the same physical form factors that are being popularized in iOS and Android devices. The strongest evidence of this that I can see is how both AMD and Intel have pretty much explicitly come out and said their next big thing in the mobile space is very much designed exclusively for Windows usage. Linux (notably Android) have been de-emphasized by both Intel and AMD for those chips as they go out of their way to endorse Windows 8. This could either be due to pressure/threats from MS but it also might be explained by Intel's relative failure to attract real partnerships in the Android space despite an earnest effort to do so, which would drive both AMD and Intel to realize that they really need microsoft to retain competitive advantage over non-x86 architectures.

Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.

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