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OS X Games

Good Old Games Adds Mac OS X Support 124

Posted by Soulskill
from the now-i-can-play-games-and-be-hip-at-the-same-time dept.
SquarePixel writes "The nostalgic games seller Good Old Games has added Mac OS X support to its platform and a catalog of games to go with it. 'During its much-ballyhooed news-a-thon, GOG drew back the curtain on a new version of its service tailored to Macs, which brings with it 50 games (eight of which you receive free just for signing up) and some rather tempting deals. Speaking of, there's this insane 32-game pay-what-you-want Interplay special leading the charge in celebration of GOG's fourth anniversary.'" Unfortunately, Linux support doesn't seem to be in the cards just yet. On a list of requested site features, Linux support has gotten quite a few votes, but a GOG employee said, "Linux is a great platform, and we love how much passion you guys are showing for it here on our wishlist. ... If we're able to bring GOG.com games to Linux--and we're constantly evaluating ways that we can do this--we want to make sure that we're doing it the GOG.com way: simple, easy, and it 'just works.' I'm not telling you guys to give up hope--we know how much you want this--but what I am saying is that this is harder to support than it might seem initially, and we're not ready to move to support Linux officially just yet."
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Good Old Games Adds Mac OS X Support

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  • Bundle (Score:5, Informative)

    by demonbug (309515) on Friday October 19, 2012 @12:20PM (#41707039) Journal

    The pay-what-you-want is actually only for 20 games, and you have to pay more than the average. The 32 games you get for $35. Just pointing that out, still a pretty good deal. Played Castles last night - exactly as I remembered it, incomprehensible. Might have to read the manual to remember how to get my idiots to actually start building; the music transported me directly back to 1991, though. Love that awesome midi sound.

  • by Red_Chaos1 (95148) on Friday October 19, 2012 @12:20PM (#41707047)

    If you want all 32 games you'll have to pay $34.99. Not bad at all, but not "pay what you want." Also seems to me that there were a lot more games from back in the day with the Interplay name on them, not just these 32.

  • by HaZardman27 (1521119) on Friday October 19, 2012 @12:28PM (#41707149)
    I think for a lot of the games that use DOSbox, it works great. However, now that we're over a decade into the 21st century, many games from 1998 - 2004 are considered classics and were not designed for DOS. Fortunately a lot of these games work pretty easily with WINE, but it of course would be nice for native Linux support. For the classic Bioware engine games (Baldur's Gate, Planescape, Icewind Dale...) there is a Linux client for GemRB, which is an open source community rewrite of the engine used for those games. You can purchase and download the GoG versions of those games, and load them up through GemRB (also works on Android!).
  • by AvitarX (172628) <me@brandyHORSEwi ... minus herbivore> on Friday October 19, 2012 @01:44PM (#41707907) Journal

    A list of games that work, and how:
    http://www.gog.com/en/mix/great_gog_games_that_works_on_linux [gog.com]

    A lot of Wine and open source ports/re implementation of the engines (was it icculus or something that did those?). Not just DOSbox.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 19, 2012 @02:03PM (#41708153)

    No, it's BSD underneath, but these games are all compiled with Xcode, so it's using the native OS X libraries and API's for everything. While a large amount the architecture of the kernel and BSD subsystem is easily emulated or even mapped to compatible API's under Linux, the native labries would need to be emulated in a similar way to WINE.

  • by beelsebob (529313) on Friday October 19, 2012 @06:01PM (#41710441)

    Uh actually, it was released in 1993 for *Mac* only.

  • by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968&gmail,com> on Friday October 19, 2012 @07:42PM (#41711311) Journal

    There is a reason for that, Win 3.x used WinG for graphics and it was VERY primitive and crash prone, DirectX came out with Win95 and was head and shoulders better than WinG.

    Its just a shame that OpenGL dropped the ball and cared more about CAD compatibility and letting the GPU manufacturers use "shims" than they did about actually competing with DirectX because between 98-02 there was a real shot at taking gaming from DirectX and OpenGL being cross platform was really nice. Now between Windows and the X360 many games are built for DirectX first and OpenGL later if at all, just a damned shame.

  • by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday October 19, 2012 @08:13PM (#41711523) Homepage Journal

    Win 3.x used WinG for graphics and it was VERY primitive and crash prone, DirectX came out with Win95 and was head and shoulders better than WinG.

    DirectX came out after Win95, and NT already had GL support and NT's software GL renderer would run on Win95.

    Its just a shame that OpenGL dropped the ball and cared more about CAD compatibility and letting the GPU manufacturers use "shims" than they did about actually competing with DirectX

    You know what's really a shame? That 3dfx made GLIDE instead of starting with MiniGL, which offered Microsoft an opportunity to make their own shitty 3D API instead of being strongly encouraged to go OpenGL, which they certainly could have done. And the rest is history.

Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it. -- Perlis's Programming Proverb #58, SIGPLAN Notices, Sept. 1982

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