Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Almighty Buck Games

Own Every SNES Game Ever Made For $24,999 199

Posted by samzenpus
from the all-I-want-for-christmas dept.
An anonymous reader writes "BSNES author and game collector Byuu has decided to put his entire collection of SNES games up for sale — at the low price of 24,999USD. The collection covers *every* game ever made for SNES, all in the original covers. From the article: 'The seller, who goes by the name "Byuu" on Reddit, says that every single game in the collection comes with its original box and approximately 85 percent of the games come with their original manuals. The collection does not include unlicensed games, and every game has been professionally cleaned and tested. "They all work perfectly," Byuu says.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Own Every SNES Game Ever Made For $24,999

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:30PM (#42247157)

    These belong in a public museum, not some private collection. I hope that somebody who is rich and who appreciates video games makes the purchase, and donates them to the Smithsonian or some other reputable museum so that they can be publicly displayed for all to see and to experience.

    • by UltraZelda64 (2309504) on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:33PM (#42247195)

      As a gamer, I actually strongly agree on this... they should be taken care of, preserved, ba a part of a museum. That's lots of history he's selling.

      BSNES is awesome, by the way.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:09PM (#42247917)
        If you give them to the Smithsonian, they're going in storage. They've only got so much display space. But they would likely be well preserved.
    • by yurtinus (1590157)
      Don't forget - many museums contain a great deal of items on loan from private collections.
    • by Hatta (162192) on Monday December 10, 2012 @08:20PM (#42247537) Journal

      There are plenty of extant copies of any of these vintage (not even antique) consumer goods. I agree that these are as culturally important as anything else in an art museum, but this sale doesn't in any way hinder industry.

      Besides, even if you ignore these games entirely, byuu has done far more than $25,000 worth of work preserving these games. Bsnes is arguably not just the best snes emulator but the most accurate emulator ever, which is likely to survive much longer than the cardboard, plastic and silicon being sold.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Lumpy (12016)

      No.

      They belong as roms on the internet for people to pay. It is utter Bullshit they are locked up and hidden because of incredibly stupid laws and insanely selfish and greedy people.

      The man needs to let someone carefully read every single rom and put them up on the net so that future generations can enjoy each one. It would hurt nobody in any way possible, I dont care what some scumbag lawyer says.

      • by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:13PM (#42247953)
        I agree with you completely. Read up on what Rufus Pollock, a Harvard professor found after doing research on copyright. The optimal length is 14 years, of which all SNES games have passed. Anything longer is corporate greed.

        As far as letting someone read them, that is exactly why I bought them in the first place. I read every one by hand with my own custom hardware (here [byuu.org] is a picture of my setup.) This allowed me to image the entire function of the PCB, not just the ROMs like current dumps. I also scanned every box, cartridge and PCB. I then put up all the information in my online database here [byuu.org]. I can't distribute the ROM images for legal reasons, but by comparing my SHA256 hashes to yours, you can verify your ROMs are legitimate and unmodified, clean dumps.
        • by jonwil (467024)

          Has there been any meaningful movement on making a SNES emulator that works more like say MAME where instead of a single ROM file you get a separate file for individual ROM chips and other data-holding devices in it and then some sort of description that links up the different chips (ROM, RAM, SRAM, co-processors, discrete parts etc) in the right way?

          • by byuu (1455609)
            That is exactly what I am doing now.

            See my database here [byuu.org]. Each game gets a manifest file that describes the board layout and each individual memory chip.

            The difference between my approach and MAME's, is that my board descriptions are external to the emulator, and not bundled in an internal database. And I also store all the files inside a unique folder per game, rather than inside a ZIP archive per game. That approach lets me put save game data into the folders as well. The database I linked can gener
      • 14 years with a 14 year extension, and I'd agree to maybe one or two more if the owner of the copyright really wants to keep it. I bet the makers of half those games don't exist or even care about their copyright on these old games anymore and wouldn't have renewed, so they should be public domain by now.

    • by LordLucless (582312) on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:00PM (#42247833)

      So do you, Doctor Jones, so do you.

    • by rolfwind (528248) on Monday December 10, 2012 @10:28PM (#42248419)

      These belong in a public museum, not some private collection. I hope that somebody who is rich and who appreciates video games makes the purchase, and donates them to the Smithsonian or some other reputable museum so that they can be publicly displayed for all to see and to experience.

      Museums are for conservations of material goods. Libraries are better to spread ideas in whatever form they come in.

      Museums are not lacking in material, I can assure you. Smithsonian only displays a tiny, tiny fraction of its inventory at any one time, and a smaller amount on tour somewhere, much of it is in warehouses, many never to see the light of day in my lifetime for want of display space. Many people I know who donated anything from their great-great-....grandfather's civil war canteen to their grandfather's US Army uniform to a local Museum often were shocked to see that stuff put up for auction from same museum. Because the museum preferred the money for budget/projects rather than common to even somewhat rare (but not especially valuable) items. It's even known some curators of smaller museums that even deal in/steal/pilfer goods and replace them with copies.

      Maybe, sometime, somewhere a super nintendo with a super mario cartridge belongs in a museum somewhere. But certainly not the whole collection. It's just going to collect dust and not going to introduce more people to the joys of that era. Private collectors would be great to care for that.

      That makes about as much sense as giving books to a museum to spread ideas. That's where a library is more appropriate. If you really want to get that, you would call for liberalizing copyright law. Tie it to patent length or something and only keep trademarks as ongoing. That way it would be legal to have the entire library up and served on the internet for generations to come and have people actually play them, if they so chose.

      I don't think it's going to be much of an experience in 100 years to go to a museum, and look at video game and dvd titles, that you may play for 5 minutes because of a line or see for 5 minutes in some demo. That would surely be a stunted experience.

    • by pantaril (1624521)

      These belong in a public museum, not some private collection. I hope that somebody who is rich and who appreciates video games makes the purchase, and donates them to the Smithsonian or some other reputable museum so that they can be publicly displayed for all to see and to experience.

      The physical goods should be surely in the care of some good museum, but the digital games should be in public domain for everyone to enjoy, not just for ultra rich people who are able to afford this overblown price.

    • by DragonTHC (208439)

      They are something which can be very easily replaced.

      They have no significance other than being the original package.

      In the Boston Science museum, there sits a non-descript floppy disk with the Morris worm written on it. The disk isn't significant, what's on it is.

      So, while they may look cool, there's no significance to a museum other than the software and box art.

      And let's be honest, SNES games are nowhere near 'Smithsonian important'.

    • by mu51c10rd (187182)

      Now I envision a middle aged guy with a brown hat and whip swooping down during the auction to swipe the collection for some museum...

  • by WGFCrafty (1062506) on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:32PM (#42247183)
    It's worth it just to play Boogerman.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    SELL that crap or no sex!

  • Meh (Score:4, Insightful)

    by spire3661 (1038968) on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:33PM (#42247199) Journal
    I have every SNES game ever made uploaded to my Google Drive.
    • I have every SNES game ever made uploaded to my Google Drive.

      For the good of all mankind, you need mirror sites right?

    • Re:Meh (Score:4, Insightful)

      by BPPG (1181851) <bppg1986@gmail.com> on Monday December 10, 2012 @10:04PM (#42248269)

      But you can't download an arcade where every game is 25 cents to play, not counting the many many gameovers that leave you needing more. You can't download that first gameboy your older cousin lent you for the week to play Dr. Mario over and over again just so you could beat his high score. You can't download the way it made you feel to finally get to the third stage of a boss that had kept illing you over and over before you knew how to time your attacks while avoiding theirs.

      And twenty years from now, gamers from today won't be able to download the group dynamics of their MMO clan, won't be able to download the step by step evolution of Minecraft indev with it's back and forth between Notch and the smaller community. They won't be able to download all the achievements, trophies, ranks, and golden guns from their favorite FPSs. They won't be able to download the connection made between shiningly creative Little Big Planet level authors after wading through the seas of shoddily-made CoD clones and Mario levels.

      I just recently got a smartphone capable of playing these old SNES games. I might download an emulator and play some games. But gaming on a touchscreen smartphone will never be the same as sitting on the carpet with my siblings, racing through the ghost levels on Super Mario Kart and figuring out exactly where to use my jumping feather to get an edge towards victory.

  • One missing game... (Score:4, Informative)

    by supersat (639745) on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:35PM (#42247215)
    Super Star Fox Weekend (Official Competition) [wikipedia.org]. It was sold through Nintendo Power after the competition ended.
    • by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @08:35PM (#42247665)
      It's a licensed retail only set. Donkey Kong Country Competition was another game sold only after a Blockbuster competition. Mountain Bike Rally + Speed Racer was another game that was only sold by mail order for $200 after you bought a $4,000 exercise bike. Noah's Ark 3D was an unlicensed game sold in Christian book stores. MACS was a training game designed for use in the US military. Powerfest '94 and Campus Challenge '92 were produced for their respective competitions, and were supposed to be destroyed (two of each were not.) SNES tester decks existed only inside Nintendo repair centers. This can pretty much go on forever, so you have to draw the line somewhere. However, many can legitimately say it's not a complete set if their definition includes any of the above.
  • pedantic correction (Score:5, Informative)

    by Trepidity (597) <.delirium-slashdot. .at. .hackish.org.> on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:35PM (#42247217)

    Slightly more restricted than "every SNES game", it's actually every regular-release SNES game sold at retail in the US, Canada, and/or Mexico. He bought them to improve the emulation quality of his emulator, bsnes.

    He says he'll use the proceeds of this sale to purchase other SNES games he doesn't have, such as assembling the complete collection of games released in Europe.

  • by pkthunders (2777383) on Monday December 10, 2012 @07:39PM (#42247245)
    We'll also throw in a free box of Twinkies! A $5000 value but yours free!
    • After Hostess went under, I decided to download my Twinkies from the cloud [littledebbie.com].
  • Shipping via free local pick up only. Looks like I'll have to pass. There's also the issue of me not having $25k to spend on 721 SNES titles but the shipping clearly is the bigger problem since I don't live in Ohio.
  • Cleaned? (Score:1, Troll)

    by superdave80 (1226592)

    ...and every game has been professionally cleaned...

    **Random dude blows dust off of cartridge contacts.

    "Cleaned. That will be twenty bucks."

    • Re:Cleaned? (Score:5, Informative)

      by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @08:41PM (#42247707)
      The PCB contacts were scrubbed with sodium hydroxide (to remove oxidation) and isopropyl alcohol (to remove residue.) Took about five minutes per cart. Which is about 60 hours of labor. Not a whole lot, it just ensures that every game will turn on with your very first try, and you won't dirty up your SNES connector on these carts.
      • by tepples (727027) <tepples&gmail,com> on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:49PM (#42248179) Homepage Journal

        The PCB contacts were scrubbed with sodium hydroxide (to remove oxidation)

        That's a lye, and you know it.

      • by Rakarra (112805)

        The PCB contacts were scrubbed with sodium hydroxide (to remove oxidation) and isopropyl alcohol (to remove residue.) Took about five minutes per cart. Which is about 60 hours of labor. Not a whole lot, it just ensures that every game will turn on with your very first try, and you won't dirty up your SNES connector on these carts.

        Not that I have the money to purchase this set, but would you have any recommendations for cleaning the inside connections of an SNES as well? Is that necessary, or are you likely to further damage/corrode the connections? I realize that since cartridges are external they're more likely to pick up dust and moisture, but I imagine after 20 years the inside of my SNES could probably use some work too.

        • Re:Cleaned? (Score:4, Informative)

          by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @11:14PM (#42248725)
          Cleaning that is much harder, since it's a card edge connector.

          You'll want isopropyl alcohol and something like DeoxIt to remove/prevent any oxidization. You need something of equivalent thickness to the original PCBs that went into the connector with cotton on the outside. Apply your cleaner, and make sure to only insert it vertically. Move to the sides and you can bend the pins. Make sure the system dries completely before powering it on.

          Would also suggest you Google edge connector cleaner for alternate methods. Quite a few people have tricks for it involving erasers and such.
  • every game has been professionally cleaned and tested.

    Man, it must have taken forever to personally blow on all those cartridges.

  • eBay link (Score:5, Interesting)

    by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @08:22PM (#42247551)
    [ eBay Link to auction ] [ebay.com]

    I am probably underselling myself here, but I would likely accept the first serious offer for $20K or above.

    That may seem like a lot, but if you do completed auction searches on eBay, you will see that the top dozen or so games (EarthBound, Hagane, Harvest Moon, Incantation, Aero Fighters, 3 Ninjas Kick Back, Metal Warriors, Mega Man X3, ...) routinely sell for $400-1000 a piece when complete in box. The next four dozen easily command $100-350. That leaves you with about $5 per complete in box game for the rest, in a market where the prices have continued to rise steadily for the past several years.
    • Re:eBay link (Score:5, Insightful)

      by adisakp (705706) on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:03PM (#42247869) Journal
      Have you thought about an Indiegogo campaign or Kickstarter to fund your effort for European and Japanese cartridges?

      Crowd-funding of projects is hot right now and it might be easier to find thousands of people who think your efforts are worth $10 to them than to find a single person willing to part with $25,000 for old game cartridges.
      • Re:eBay link (Score:4, Interesting)

        by byuu (1455609) on Monday December 10, 2012 @09:28PM (#42248047)
        Willing to try it I suppose. A lot of the trouble is finding the games in the first place. For that, I am going to need people in Europe and Japan who can scour game shops, build up small bundles and ship them internationally all at once. Many of them will be very, very hard to find at all.
        • by adisakp (705706)
          Well, for what it's worth, both Kickstarter and Indiegogo let you build up a list of people interested in your projects and send them updates on your project's status. You could send e-mails specifying cartridges you need to your entire list of funders and as long as you don't do it to often (i.e. less than once a month) people probably won't find it intrusive.

FORTRAN is for pipe stress freaks and crystallography weenies.

Working...