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EA Offering Free Game to Users After SimCity Launch Problems 259

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the replacement-game-broken-too dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The SimCity launch earlier this week was a complete disaster. Single player games that require an Internet connection to enable forced multiplayer features (as well as acting as a form of DRM) is bad enough, but then to not be prepared for the demand such a popular franchise has, well, that's just dumb, and Lucy Bradshaw, EA's general manager for the Maxis Label, has admitted exactly that." They did not provide much details, but supposedly anyone who has SimCity now should get "a free PC download game from the EA portfolio." They are unrepentant about the always-online requirement though.
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EA Offering Free Game to Users After SimCity Launch Problems

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  • by dreamchaser (49529) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:01PM (#43126095) Homepage Journal

    EA has been producing crappier and crappier games and screwing over customers for years now. Their workers operate in near sweatshop (ok I wax hyperbolic, but it's not good) working conditions. They could give me their entire catalog for free and I still would never buy another one of their future titles.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:30PM (#43126255)

      Don't pay to be a beta tester, and get an old game as a "reward'. Continue to ask for refunds, and dispute bank charges. Games shouldn't be rentals.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:45PM (#43126365)

        Games shouldn't be rentals.

        Well, yes, but if tens or hundreds of millions of people support that business model, then it's going to succeed. The way to once again have games that don't require someone else's permission to play is to buy those kinds of games, not the kind that are DRMed out the ass..

        You get what you ask for.

      • by Goaway (82658) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @02:17PM (#43126561) Homepage

        Games shouldn't be rentals.

        But they are going to be, because this is the one and only form of copy protection that can actually work. Publishers are not going to give that up any time soon.

        • In what way does it "actually work?" There are DRM free pirate releases of every game ever released in the past with "always on" DRM. It may take a few more days to crack, but it's hardly "working," especially when it's pissing off nearly all your actual customers.

          • by DR.F33LG00D (2809487) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @03:36PM (#43127021)
            Lol, it's hilarious watching these companies spend billions trying to fight piracy. The pirates always get an easier version to install and play than the people who pay, and sometimes, we even get the release ahead of time. There is NO WAY to secure some code that is running LOCALLY on my computer. I mean, wtf do they think they can do...put a dll or exe that has a check to verify you are logged in the EA servers when playing single player and make it impossible to crack? Hackers will isolate that code, remove it, and/or put stub API calls to always return true for where it is doing the API call to their servers, and the whole "security by online verification" goes out the window. These kinds of patches are happening all the time with games today, with cracked versions being released ahead of time or at most within a day or 2 after the release. Guess who has to deal with the issues where the servers are down? Paying customers... Theoretically, if they ran everyone's installations on their servers and it was streamed to the customers local machines, I am sure hackers would still find a way to aggregate all the content and make a distro. Or, they would just hack the servers and get the source code. This is why content providers would embrace a service like On-Live as a means of distribution for their titles. It streams the actual rendered frames to the user instead of giving them access to the binaries that run the game. Too bad that us 'old-fasioned' gamers (god, I'm old...how did this happen) will never be happy with the input lag and other issues with a service like this. I tried beta testing on-live and literally LOLed at the irony of the fact that it errored out due to my video card not supporting shader model 3.0. I heard the beta testing they did was a complete failure, as expected, because no one can handle that kind of bandwidth yet. EA, Blizzard, etc. we've seen their servers fall to their knees during releases of major products. And On-Live somehow thinks they are going to be able to stream all this content to end users for all games without their servers falling to their knees? Yea right, not in the next 10 years. Yes, getting an ISO with a CRACK folder that I have to drag and drop over to the installation directory is such a trivial task that I find it easier than paying for a game from a local store, Amazon, or any other means of distribution available. With torrent speeds that max out my connection, from the right super secret sites, I can get games faster than downloading it from any content provider and have it running within 20 minutes from the point of clicking download. Steam is amazing, though. That's one service that I feel was done right. I use Steam for purchasing games that I want to play online with other people. So for now, torrents for single player games and steam for online games seems like the way to go.
        • by Pharmboy (216950) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @03:17PM (#43126889) Journal

          Actually, this is one form of copy protection that DOESN'T work. The fact is, I was all ready to buy the game. I actually buy all my games, haven't pirated one in forever. (I'm old, employed, $60 is no biggie).

          Now I won't buy the game simply because I couldn't play it if I did, and I don't want a game that forces me to save games online, be online when I play, can't be played on an airplane or in the car, etc. And it will stop working once they get tired of hosting the servers.

          I've bought every SimCity game ever made and many other sim games from Maxis. Paid money, not pirated. 1, 2k, 3k, 4, Societies, Sim Copter, even Sim Tower and The Sims 1 and 2, simant, simfarm, and so on. I just can't buy this in good conscience because I don't know if I will be able to use it like I wanted to. And that is sad, since I love their games. Maybe, just maybe, I will buy it if someone comes out with a cracked version, and just use the cracked version. I don't mind spending the money, I just don't like being treated like a criminal once I've given them the money. At least with Steam, I can play most games offline and on different computers.

        • by Opportunist (166417) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @04:44PM (#43127375)

          Actually, it's the one form of copy protection that will not only not work but actually drive customers away.

          Let's be frank here, what is happening now?

          1. People buy game.
          2. People try to play and fail.
          3. People search for solutions.
          4. People stumble upon someone telling them that the game has been cracked and that the cracked version works.
          5. People download cracked version.
          6. People play game.

          For other games, they'll just omit the (for them pointless) steps 1-4.

        • by Darinbob (1142669) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @07:32PM (#43128141)

          This DRM is not about preventing piracy,. DRM in games has never been about piracy. Pirates aren't slowed down by this at all. The sole purpose of DRM in games is to prevent your legal rights to resell the games you purchased. Publishers are more afraid of game resales than piracy. Preventing resales will keep the prices of the game higher, and the publishers know this, from EA to Valve (there are no good guys in the DRM world).

          Consider that if you were allowed to sell your crappy copy of SimCity 5 that the market would be flooded with cheap copies by now from the disgruntled customers, from $5-10. From eBay to bargain bins to just giving the game to unsuspecting friends. Consider that after all this screw up the game is still selling for FULL PRICE! $59.99! Note also that the physical copy is also $59.99, you get not even one single cent of discount for buying the digital copy, savings are not passed on to you.

          The most amazing thing is that the same customers being screwed by DRM are also fans of it and will promote it. Just like you are implying that publishers have to do this, if you repeat this lie long enough customers will believe it.

      • by Duds (100634)

        That won't work because just by buying it you accepted it was a rental. No-one bought without the knowledge that it was server dependant and therefore that the servers (and thus the game) would be switch off as soon as it became unprofitable.

        Or 2 seconds after the release of Sim City 6.

      • by Seumas (6865)

        Most services like Steam and Origin will shut down your account (and, therefore, all the games you "own" within it) if you do a credit card chargeback (as is your right as a customer of the credit card company).

        • Can't speak for Origin (as I don't use it) but at least Steam provides a lot of benefits to outweigh the DRM inherent. I will never misplace or damage a game disk, I don't have to put the CD in to play a game (or swap everytime I change games) I can effortlessly install any or all of my steam games on a new computer, and of course Steam Sales! Plus Steam also provides their own in-game chat, achivement trackers, and a ton of other little things. This. This is how you DRM. Steam's DRM is fairly unobtrusive
          • by Darinbob (1142669)

            Again, customers ironically defending the same publishers that are screwing them and stealing away their rights! "It's ok if he beats me, deep down he really loves me."

            How do you explain that if you buy a physical copy of a Steam game is still comes with DRM and you can not give that physical copy away? The only thing the physical copy does is help you download it faster and to have something to pick up at the store.

            If Valve is so full of saints then how come they refuse to let you resell or gift their ga

    • by Penguinisto (415985) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:34PM (#43126285) Journal

      So in other words, EA is saying: "we're sorry you discovered that our product is complete DRM-ridden shit, so we want to allow you to download any of our outdated examples of complete DRM-ridden shit from our online catalog!"

      I'm thinking that a lot of otherwise unconcerned folks are discovering the hard way that maybe DRM is a bad idea?

      Nah - too much to hope for.

      • by Moraelin (679338) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @03:32PM (#43126997) Journal

        You know, it just occurs to me... their problem with piracy and with second hand games is that someone gets to play one of EA's games, and EA doesn't get paid for it.

        So let me get this straight, the result of putting the idiotic DRM in SimCity, is... that now a LOT of people get to play one of EA's (other) games, and EA doesn't get paid for it.

        Sure, most of those wouldn't have bought the other EA game, but then neither would have most pirates. That is, outside of putting the BS in BSA.

        But if you do the the maths BSA style, where every single copy downloaded is a lost sale -- and you just know whoever came up with that over-the-top DRM is -- yeah, great job, EA. Did you need a scope to shoot yourself in the foot so neatly, or is it a natural talent?

        No, seriously, releasing SimCity without DRM would have probably resulted in less people playing an unpaid copy, AND saved them from all the negative publicity and angry customers.

        • by bugnuts (94678)

          ... releasing SimCity without DRM would have probably resulted in less people playing an unpaid copy [of one of EA's games], AND saved them from all the negative publicity and angry customers.

          Best quote I've read all day.

          It's slightly weakened by some of the online aspects, but certainly should apply to the single-player mode.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:34PM (#43126297)

      What's interesting is the date they've set for the claim:

      On March 18, SimCity players who have activated their game will receive an email telling them how to redeem their free game.

      That date is over a week away, and almost two weeks from the initial release: why would they set it so far ahead? I guess the logical explanation for it is to allow for people who ordered a copy via snail-mail, but the cynic in me wonders if they're trying to bulk out the sale numbers with "look, it now comes with a free game, and you've got ages to join in! Please buy it! Ignore the bad reviews, think of the other game you'll get for free!".

    • by History's Coming To (1059484) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:44PM (#43126361) Journal
      This is why I've simply decided not to buy another EA game. Battlefield 3 was the final straw for me - 3 downloads of around 2Gb each in the first three months? Any you have to download them to continue to play online? And the patches required are only a few Mb and the rest is DLC which you have to download whether you want to pay to have it activated or not?

      To top it all, when I tried to contact them to see if patch-only downloads were available (I'm on a slow connection that 6Gb of downloads would swamp) I was told I didn't have the right date of birth. I ended up having to use the UK Data Protection Act to get hold of my account details, and sure enough my DOB was correct. The data also included "customer offered 15% discount" - which was news to me.

      I give up , I'm simply not going to buy another £40 coaster from them, I have enough of those.
      • by data2 (1382587)

        Has been this way with battlefield 2 as well. Each "update", which seemed incremental, i.e. names such as update_103_to_104.tar.bz2, was a complete replacement and even overwrote your configs if you didn't save them someplace else. Servers were a pita to run as well, but I guess they solved that with their stupid rental model now.

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        People have known EA was full of sleaze for decades now. This should come as no surprise to anyone. I sort of feel sorry for Maxis for getting involved here and tarnishing their own game. But they made their own problem when they partnered with known scumbags.

    • by Seumas (6865)

      I don't want a free game. I just want my money back. I've had no problems connecting and playing -- the game is just shit. This isn't SimCity. This is . . . a sort of high-gloss facebook game. Giving me a free game (that I probably already own) does nothing for me. Just give me my money back and you MIGHT have a chance of me returning to Origin as a customer. Maybe (and I buy a LOT of stuff).

    • by JMJimmy (2036122)

      They could give me their entire catalog for free and I still would never buy another one of their future titles.

      Their entire catalogue consists of 51 titles currently, the majority of which either require online DRM or have already had their servers shut down. Just what people pissed off about online DRM want.

  • by Zemran (3101) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:02PM (#43126103) Homepage Journal

    ... that with all that really bad DRM shai'te no one would actually buy it... so they were not prepared for actual sales.

  • by Beavertank (1178717) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:05PM (#43126111)
    There's an easy fix to this: Never, ever, ever buy a game that has always on DRM.

    Eventually the game manufacturers will learn.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:38PM (#43126319)

      There's an easy fix to this: Never, ever, ever buy a game that has always on DRM.

      Eventually the game manufacturers will learn.

      We HAVE voted with our wallets. And we're getting clearly outvoted, else publishers and developers wouldn't keep doing it.

      • Sadly it will take a lot of people not buying or pirating several games that would otherwise be popular for them to get it, they'll blame piracy or that the game wasn't very good before they believe that the drm they waste money on is the problem (kickbacks from the companies that sell this snake oil wouldn't be unbelievable to me).

        Mycroft
      • by meerling (1487879) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @03:50PM (#43127089)
        "Vote with your wallet" does NOT work unless you can get a massive portion of the entire market to participate. (Or more accurately, refuse to participate.)
        All the retailer sees is a slight dip in sales for campaigns that start after something has been on the market for a while. If it's a new product, sales just aren't as high as they could be, but the retailers have no idea what it could have been.
        Not buying the product is INVISIBLE TO THE RETAILER. Unless, as I stated earlier, you can virtually wipe out all sales, something that is virtually impossible. (Ebola plague juice being an exception.)

        Here's the best way to get it through their thick adamantium plated marketing spin enhanced skulls. COMMUNICATE!
        Email, in large enough quantities, can get their attention. However, some companies kind of ignore or filter that stuff, and besides, they are wary of scriptbots spamming them.
        Dead Tree Format Snail Mail may be old fashioned, but companies will pay a LOT more attention to it. I've seen email campaigns that got thousands of responses that got ignored, when a letter writing campaign of 60-80 letters got an immediate and positive response for the same issue.

        Here's another hint. Don't attack, insult, or threaten them. That's another fast way to get you attempt neutralized, and maybe even get some cops knocking on your door. That doesn't mean you can't tell them what you don't like, how you feel about it, and what you think is a better idea, just be polite and civil about it.
        You see, the person reading the mail, usually isn't the person in charge. Though they may forward your mail up the chain of command. Attacking that person is NOT going to help you, in fact, that kind of stuff usually makes them roundfile your letter. (Yes, that means throw it away, or if that's illegal, throw it into the dusty box in the backroom that nobody ever looks in.)
        You being an impolite thug with lots of profanity and the like will get a similar response to attacking people.
        And I wish I didn't happen to mention it, but don't make threats. Either physical or legal. Physical threats will get you in a permanent troublemaker file where you will be ignored by everyone except the police. And yes, they do occasionally respond to these kinds of threats with investigations and arrests.
        As to legal threats, they are a different problem. You may get ignored, depending on the details, but most likely you will get sent to the legal department that will decide how valid your threats are, and proceed from there. As to proceeding from there, nothing will ever happen until the legal paperwork for a court date or whatever shows up. You can't bluff a lawyer with legal threats, you actually have to follow through, and of course, taking legal action against a company is not what writing to them is for. Legal threats will get even less attention from a company than physical threats, and neither one will advance your cause.

        One final note for everyone. A well written letter is good, but a thousand identical letters isn't a thousand times better. Have a skilled writer make a template or example for people to use, but everyone should personalize it to make each letter unique, but clear and to the point. After all, the same exact letter over and over will just be treated as spam.

        That's about all I can say, other than I'm as sick of hearing people say vote with your wallet, because it just doesn't work.
      • by jd2112 (1535857)

        There's an easy fix to this: Never, ever, ever buy a game that has always on DRM.

        Eventually the game manufacturers will learn.

        We HAVE voted with our wallets. And we're getting clearly outvoted, else publishers and developers wouldn't keep doing it.

        In the eyes of an EA exec (Or MPAA/RIAA, etc) Any and all lost sales are due to piracy.

      • To EA, that means you didn't vote with your wallet but clearly that you copied it and that their DRM is not invasive enough.

        I have no idea what else they could come up with, though. Maybe next you'll need a webcam and face recognition software making sure that it's really YOU who play.

    • There should be legislation that forces purchased software (licenses) must be transferable (striking all EULAs restricting that), and if someone buys add-ons for software and subsequently transfers that software, those addons must be transferable with it (even if from different companies). That would include downloadable content.

      The whole ability for companies to be able to write felonies into their EULAs through abusing of the Computer Crime "illegal access" and requiring online connections needs to stop.

      W

  • by pclminion (145572) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:05PM (#43126115)
    In order to make you feel better, please choose one of our other shitty products. Two shitty games are better than one!
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:22PM (#43126217)

      You, sir, are an optimist.

      The actual wording is pretty smarmy. Using the word portfolio leads one to believe one will be able to select any title from their portfolio. But read it carefully and you'll see not only does it not say that, it doesn't say you will have ANY choice as to which game.

    • by jd2112 (1535857)

      In order to make you feel better, please choose one of our other shitty products. Two shitty games are better than one!

      And good luck getting to the activation server.

  • by grim4593 (947789) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:06PM (#43126119)
    A free single-player version of the new SimCity game would be nice.
    • What about a Simcity 4.5? or simcity 4 source code?

      Even if out looking at the DRM simcity 5 is to dumbed down and the city sizes are to small.

      Now I used to play simcity 4 + NAM and other plugins But it needs the source code to fix stuff.

      The simcity 5 beta made my move from maybe buy to not buy and buy a different game.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      There are older versions of Sim City that are single player. Maybe you should play one of those games. Making a new game means changing things. I suppose they could of just changed released Sim City 2000 with hi res textures. But I think that would of been a failure as well. Adding multiplayer is a reasonable change. Selling more copies of the game than you have servers for is stupid.
      • by BonThomme (239873) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @02:06PM (#43126499) Homepage

        "adding multiplayer" implies nothing was subtracted

      • Multiplayer Sim City does sound interesting, I agree, but they've gone about doing it in entirely the wrong way.

        A much smarter way would have been to implement save-games in a Git-like fashion, where you can pick and choose which people to play with.

        This obviously won't work for a real time game, but for games like Sim City and the like, it'd work just fine. Hell, a Civilization style game could work fine as well.

  • The better product (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Groo Wanderer (180806) <charlie@noSpam.semiaccurate.com> on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:06PM (#43126121) Homepage

    And they keep bitching at me when I write up that piracy has moved past "free" and now is about a demonstrably better product. Free is almost lost in the noise now. The state of modern consumer fleecing has gotten painful to watch.

  • > They are unrepentant about the always-online requirement though.

    And I am equally unrepentant about not buying any more of their stuff.

  • by SternisheFan (2529412) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:12PM (#43126149)
    POSTED BY Lucy Bradshaw ON Mar 8, 2013 A SimCity UpdateAnd Something For Your Trouble

    Here’s a quick update on the problems we were experiencing with SimCity – and a little something extra for people who bought the game.

    The server issues which began at launch have improved significantly as we added more capacity. But some people are still experiencing response and stability problems that we’re working fast to address.

    So what went wrong? The short answer is: a lot more people logged on than we expected. More people played and played in ways we never saw in the beta.

    OK, we agree, that was dumb, but we are committed to fixing it. In the last 48 hours we increased server capacity by 120 percent. It’s working – the number of people who have gotten in and built cities has improved dramatically. The number of disrupted experiences has dropped by roughly 80 percent.

    So we’re close to fixed, but not quite there. I’m hoping to post another update this weekend to let everyone know that the launch issues are behind us.

    Something Special for Your Trouble (see linked page at bottom of post)

    The good news is that SimCity is a solid hit in all major markets. The consensus among critics and players is that this is fundamentally a great game. But this SimCity is made to be played online, and if you can’t get a stable connection, you’re NOT having a good experience. So we’re not going to rest until we’ve fixed the remaining server issues.

    And to get us back in your good graces, we’re going to offer you a free PC download game from the EA portfolio. On March 18, SimCity players who have activated their game will receive an email telling them how to redeem their free game.

    I know that’s a little contrived – kind of like buying a present for a friend after you did something crummy. But we feel bad about what happened. We’re hoping you won’t stay mad and that we’ll be friends again when SimCity is running at 100 percent.

    SimCity is a GREAT game and the people who made it are incredibly proud. Hang in there – we’ll be providing more updates throughout the weekend.

    http://www.ea.com/news/a-simcity-update-and-something-for-your-trouble [ea.com]

    • by Huntr (951770)
      That response is as big a pile of horseshit as the game. Of course, that's expected marketing spin, but at some point the bald truth saves more face than grasping at straws (I wish...).

      The good news is that SimCity is a solid hit in all major markets.

      Gamers don't care about that. The good news would be your mess is un-f'd.

      Actually, I think this is a great example of why digital downloads (of anything) shouldn't cost as much as the same thing distributed on disk. Obviously the net worth of the digitally distributed version of these games is such that EA can pass out a

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 09, 2013 @02:03PM (#43126487)

      So what went wrong? The short answer is: a lot more people logged on than we expected. More people played and played in ways we never saw in the beta.

      Beta tester here: Maybe if their beta lasted longer then 24 hours they would have seen this coming.

    • I really cannot help but comment. I usually don't even bother reading through marketing drivel, but I just cannot resist in this case. Also, I'm usually not one to weigh someone's words, but in this case I will. Mostly because with press statements by big companies it can usually be said that these are very, very carefully worded and reread a few times before being pushed out the door.

      POSTED BY Lucy Bradshaw ON Mar 8, 2013
      A SimCity UpdateAnd Something For Your Trouble

      Here’s a quick update on the problems we were experiencing with SimCity – and a little something extra for people who bought the game.

      The server issues which began at launch have improved significantly as we added more capacity. But some people are still experiencing response and stability problems that we’re working fast to address.

      So what went wrong? The short answer is: a lot more people logged on than we expected. More people played and played in ways we never saw in the beta.

      No kidding? You saw more people play than were in the beta? Now, I may be working in the wrong field in IT, but isn't that t

  • If I cant even play a single player game off-line I wont buy it. Fuck em I hope SimCity crashes and burns hard.
    BTW I have purchased all of the other SimCitys as well as some of the side games, BUT I will NEVER buy SimCity again until they remove this allways on DRM crap.
    PS. Did I mention FUCK EM.

  • by BenJeremy (181303) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:22PM (#43126219)

    I expect, given EA's greed, that this will be the "free game" they give to every victim of their ineptitude. ...that or they'll give away free copies of Star Wars: The Old Republic

  • by Loki_666 (824073) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:24PM (#43126229)

    but I'm already boycotting any always connected games or any other product. I can live without, plenty of other good games available, plus my back catalog of awesome games that i always go back to, and thanks to visualization, i can always return to even the oldest ones.

    After the Bioware debacle where they disabled their authentication servers (fortunately games still playable online) and Gamespy shutting down their old servers (without the publishers releasing patches to enable online matchups without gamespy - eg: Marvel: Ultimate Alliance), I'm totally against any form of always-on connection.

    I'm not even willing to trust Steam now. I believe Gabe is a good man, and as long as he is at the helm things will be cool, but one day he will be gone, and when the first profit oriented CEO takes over, it will just turn into another EA or Ubisoft, and at that point, support for old games will suddenly disappear, and one by one, those games you paid for will no longer work. Or at least that is my guess... i'm not willing to risk it. I want the games i bought to be mine.

    • by Loki_666 (824073)

      LOL... And, just to reinforce my belief, my internet just dropped 2 seconds after making this post. If I was playing an always online game at that point, my game would have either stopped/lagged badly/or maybe just crashed.

  • by ChangeOnInstall (589099) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:25PM (#43126235)

    I have the income to buy them. I have the desire to play them. I have the computer hardware to play them. And I won't pirate them.

    But I won't pay you $50 or $60 and be rewarded with the very kind of stress that I've purchased the game to temporarily escape from. You're not going to stop the pirates, but you are going to stop me.

  • by HalAtWork (926717) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:26PM (#43126241)
    What sense does it make to give SimCity players another game from EA that they probably don't want? My dad got this game and he's not interested in playing Dead Space or whatever else, he only wants to play SimCity. They should just fix the problems the game has in the first place and allow "offline single player mode" a.k.a. normal fucking single player mode like any other game has.
  • Poor Maxis, i feel so bad for them.
    • Yup. Behind the horrible crust of DRM and connectivity problems, there's a fine game inside.
      • The sad part is, there isn't. What I've seen so far is that the game was dumbed down enough that even SC2000 looks complicated in comparison.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Poor Maxis, i feel so bad for them.

      It's sad how often this [minus.com] can reasonably be updated.

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @01:44PM (#43126351)

    A really great aspect of mobile game development is that while game makers can expect you probably will have networking, they can't rely on it always working. So while they can build features that make good use of networking they can't really make games that don't work when disconnected.

  • They are unrepentant about the DRM issue that caused the problem and have been busy spinning it as a popularity issue instead. They have no plans or intention of changing their ways and hope that this offering smooths over a public relations debacle.

    This game, and EA themselves need to be boycotted for the good of the industry until such time as EA repents and changes their ways. A grassroots boycott that costs them far more money than their imaginary losses from piracy is the only thing that can get them t

  • Imagine if you had a plumber in to do some work, and they warrantied the labor on their work, such that they would come back at no additional charge if there were any problems with the work that they did. Only a week or so later, the pipe starts leaking, leaving no doubt whatsoever that they did an incompetent job. You can get them to come back in to fix it, per their alleged warranty, but do you really want a plumber who evidently does that poor a job actually doing any more work on your place?
  • And as a result, I'll continue to not buy the game.

    Sooner or later EA is going to piss off too many people with shoddy service, and they'll be in real trouble. It'd actually be nice if the game tanked due to nonsense like this: it'd be a warning to the rest of the industry.

  • I hope EA rots in hell after their customers take them to the fiscal guillotine.
  • I stopped buy ea games years ago and have been much happier gaming since.
  • I am not paying 60 bucks to be at the mercy of your servers just to play sim fucking city, and tanks for renforcing that to me by not being able to keep up with demand of your own product, did you not look at how many copies you sold?

  • by data2 (1382587) on Saturday March 09, 2013 @03:34PM (#43127005)

    I often travel a few hours by train or other measures, where I have lots of free time on my hands. I would have loved buying simcity 5, and very nearly did, but then heard about the always on requirement. Which frankly, just doesn't make sense for this kind of game.
    Also losing my save-state when the internet connection at home goes down: Who designs crap like that?

  • haven't these people suffered enough?
  • The problem becomes that regardless of how this works out, EA isn't accountable. If you boycott the game and don't buy it, EA assumes this is entirely the fault of the game or developer. If you do buy it, EA thinks you're apathetic or complacent about whatever silly DRM they've employed and will continue using and/or cooking up crappy new anti-consumer methods. Unfortunately, the better scenario is buying the game. You have to support titles and developers you like, despite the evil publishing facility

I use technology in order to hate it more properly. -- Nam June Paik

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