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Android Bug Games Hardware

Firsthand Impressions of Now-Delayed NVIDIA SHIELD 74

Posted by timothy
from the blame-agent-99 dept.
NVIDIA's Android-based gaming gaming handheld called SHIELD was to start shipping today to customers who had pre-ordered it. Reader MojoKid writes "Unfortunately, in its last round of QA work, NVIDIA uncovered a problem with a third-party component used in SHIELD and will be pushing the launch date out into July. NVIDIA is, however, allowing some members of the press to talk a bit about their experiences with a couple of Tegra 4-optimized games — namely Real Boxing and Blood Sword: Sword of Ruin — and also about an AR Drone controlled by SHIELD with a bird's eye view. The AR Drone streams video from its on-board HD camera to the SHIELD device as you fly. Just launching the thing high into the air and peering into trees or over the houses in the neighborhood is really cool."
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Firsthand Impressions of Now-Delayed NVIDIA SHIELD

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    ...for double the hits.

  • Ouya could have benefited from another month or two...

  • by Anonymous Coward

    NVIDIA's Android-based gaming gaming handheld called SHIELD was to start shipping today to customers who had pre-ordered it.

    I see the editor is a fan of Little Ceaser's

    • by Megane (129182)
      They did that so they could bring you "Blood Sword: Sword of Ruin". So you can have your Blood Sword Sword on your Android Gaming Gaming. (Doh yawg, I heard you like gaming gaming, so...)
  • by Picass0 (147474) on Thursday June 27, 2013 @10:41AM (#44121881) Homepage Journal

    According to wikipedia there are over 900 million Android mobile devices in the world. That's a lot of potential gamers who want to play something better than Fruit Ninja. At this point EA ports some of their stuff and then there's Gameloft - everything they publish would be laughed off another platform.

    I have a Tegra 3 based device - an Asus Transformer - and Need for Speed is the only game I play that doesn't piss me off.

    "...but there's no buttons or joystick and so controls suck" Bullshit. I've paired a Wii classic controller through bluetooth and used it to play old MAME arcade stuff. There's countless bluetooth joysticks in the world. Game publishers could code the option to use them (and tell gamers it's heavily recomended) and then start writing some decent games.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      900 M devices & most owners who will not pay a single penny for any extra software.

      Especially to a US (game) company.

      • by Megane (129182)
        ...but they will pay for that pink hair on their character. And a sparkly unicorn for it to ride around on. Who needs to charge for razor handles when you can sell personalized blades to pre-teens?
      • by Jeng (926980)

        Those whom would pay for extra hardware tend to also be those who would purchase extra software.

        • Possibly. However people tend to undervalue software. People that complain that a phone app costs 99c, then go spend $3 on a coffee. There seem to be plenty of people that see hardware as tangible and something they won't get for free so they'll pay for it. But then software cost is avoidable, either by just sticking to free software or by pirating commercial stuff.

          So I expect there's an awful lot of people that would buy hardware add-ons that won't pay for games.

          You said "tend", and I think that's right. B

      • Kind of a catch 22. I'm not willing to pay a single penny because I haven't seen anything worth paying for. No one will develop anything good because no one is buying software. I'm hoping Ouya and Shield will change the market.
    • I've paired a Wii classic controller through bluetooth

      The application you probably used to do this stopped working under Android 4.2 [ccpcreations.com]. Now all I get on my Nexus 7 is "No route to host".

      There's countless bluetooth joysticks in the world.

      But not 900 million of them. How many people would be willing to buy a $60 Bluetooth joystick that clamps onto a phone or tablet just to play a $3 game?

      • by Picass0 (147474)

        You're right that I'm still running 4.1.1, I wan't aware the Wiimote app had stopped working. To be honest, it's not a big picture solution to the problem.

        Ultimately for gaming to expand on Android players need to know when they buy a game
        1) It will work on their device.
        2) The controls will be more that a hodge-podge of shakes and swipe actions. It's time for bluetooth joystick support to become standard. When you buy computer hardware it usually has stickers "Compatable with..." and then all the flavors

      • The application you probably used to do this stopped working under Android 4.2 [ccpcreations.com]. Now all I get on my Nexus 7 is "No route to host".

        This is total horseshit on Google's part. I recently switched from a phone running Gingerbread to a Galaxy Nexus running 4.2.2 and I can pretty definitively say Android is worse for it. Bluetooth connectivity just plain doesn't work for a lot of stuff, what does work takes for-goddamn-ever to connect, the sound quality is crap, and they even took out proxy authintication for the browser. Why? Who the fuck knows? tl, dr: Fuck Google and fuck their Android "improvements"

      • It's a little known fact that Android supports USB controllers... I use one from time to time on the nexus 7.
        Adding a $9 USB gamepad and a USB OTG cable can immensely improve the tablet gaming experience.

        • by tepples (727027)

          Adding a $9 USB gamepad and a USB OTG cable can immensely improve the tablet gaming experience.

          I've used a USB OTG cable to connect a controller to my Nexus 7. But this runs into a few problems in practice. Solve all these problems and I'll agree with you.

          First, it might work for tablets if you already have a stand, but can you recommend something to hold a phone in place while the user is holding the controller? The Shield has a hinge to hold the screen in place, much like the Game Boy Advance SP. It's like the difference between a laptop and a tablet with a separate keyboard, and an integrated k

      • by Nyder (754090)

        But not 900 million of them. How many people would be willing to buy a $60 Bluetooth joystick that clamps onto a phone or tablet just to play a $3 game?

        I'm sure the person would play more then 1 game.

        • by tepples (727027)

          I'm sure the person would play more then 1 game.

          More than one game? Yes. More than one game that needs a gamepad? Not quite as likely. If ten games are installed on a device but a gamepad improves only one of them, I'm not so sure the person would buy a gamepad.

    • So people are going to prop their phone up in front of them or something while they hold a controller? Android is a great development platform, but you need a separate device that connects to a TV (or tablet) to really use controller based games. The biggest advantage of using android (nexus Q etc), would be that your games stay associated with your account on whatever android device you're using.
    • by mckwant (65143)

      > That's a lot of potential gamers who want to play something better than Fruit Ninja.

      Except that you're assuming:
      a) That all 900M of those devices are still active (bitter about a shoddily made $99 tablet).
      b) Of the active ones, that they're capable of gaming (my phone's fine, but the tablets weren't, Android market fragmentation).
      c) Of those remaining, that their owners want to game.
      d) Of that subset, that they want to play something better than Fruit Ninja.

      and possibly:

      e) Of THAT subset, that the

      • by Picass0 (147474)

        Nintendo sold 118m Gameboy handhelds. The DS has sold 157m worldwide. Android dwarfs both of those numbers.

        I doubt all Android owners are all gamers or that they all have a device worth playing on. Still, nothing changes the fact this is a neglected, potentially huge market for quality gaming. The big names in game development are staying away in droves.

        • by mckwant (65143)

          Fine, we disagree. I don't see how one would pitch developing one's game in Android. Too many variables:

          - Screen Resolution - A free Android phone from my carrier is 480x800. It isn't, but for convenience's sake, let's call that the base. Top is 1080p (1920x1080, I always have to check), with 4k on the horizon eventually.
          - Screen Size - Phone is 3.7", top "vaguely affordable living room" screen is what, now, 80"?
          - CPU / RAM - God only knows, let alone the question of resources actually available.
          - Local

  • I mean the games could be cool, and the performance great, but it doesn't change the fact they slapped a screen on a controller and called it a day.

    At a time when everybody is going crazy about thin devices like tablets and phones, this thing comes out as an affront to good design.

    Sure, I guess nVidia is testing the waters and seeing if there is even any interest in them producing a game platform, but I mean its a pretty weak effort IMHO. Maybe their follow up will be more inspiring, if they get to that po

  • What's the point of mentioning the AR Drone? Any device running Android or iOS (Windows and Linux as well, there are plenty of open source projects that can control it) can do this.

It's later than you think, the joint Russian-American space mission has already begun.

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