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IEEE Predicts 85% of Daily Tasks Will Be Games By 2020 146

Posted by samzenpus
from the hit-the-reset-button dept.
cagraham writes "According to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), over 85% of daily tasks will include game elements by 2020. The organization, whose motto is 'Advancing Technology for Humanity,' looked at the growth of games in fields such as healthcare, education, and enterprise when preparing their report. Member Tom Coughlin summarized the findings, saying that 'by 2020, however many points you have at work will help determine the kind of raise you get or which office you sit in.'"
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IEEE Predicts 85% of Daily Tasks Will Be Games By 2020

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    ...Another kill-streak and I'd have that corner office.

    • *imagines the office of the future daily announcements as people climb the ranks*

      general staff...
      assistant Manager
      Manager!
      General Manager!
      Vice PRESIDENT!!!
      !EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT!
      !!CEO!!
      !!!CHAIRMAN!!!
      WICKED SICK,SICK,SICK...

  • And then you can go a choose your own adventure in how to get rid of them with some tracks having there own side games.

  • I want to have simple games inside of windows boot. At least a snake knockoff. Maybe people will actually want to reboot every patch Tues.
    • This was done on the C64 with Invade-a-Load. You'd play a tiny space invaders game while the actual game you wanted to play loaded from cassette.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I... [wikipedia.org]
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

  • First Life would be a fun game if it were for the Pay2Win nature of the in game cash shop.

  • by raxhonp (136733) on Monday March 03, 2014 @05:14PM (#46390397)

    We desperately need more cooperation if we want to survive..

    • by rtaylor (70602)

      And if they award points for cooperation?

      This is taking KPI (Key Performance Indicator) to a personalized level and giving them scores. Of course, as with current KPIs you get what you measure, and they rarely measure what senior management thinks they do.

      The most effective way to stop getting customer complaints is to stop answering the phone.

    • by epyT-R (613989)

      No, not necessarily. While too much competition can prevent individuals from getting much done as a group, too much cooperation oppresses individual initiative when it denies the opportunity for the individual to advance socially in the group (and materially) for his efforts. It also encourages laziness and apathy among the less capable individuals which creates more resentment from the more capable. This dynamic is the foundation of bureaucracy.

    • by d'baba (1134261)
      Yes. Most definitely more tit for tat.
  • by deathcloset (626704) on Monday March 03, 2014 @05:17PM (#46390423) Journal
    To get someone to do something, it must be all three of these things:

    1) Simple
    2) Engaging
    3) Rewarding

    I came up with this recently when I was trying to define why some games make you want to play them more than others and I realized that it might apply to just about any activity that people engage in. Do this to housework/chores and voila! People will do it. The challenge is how to do this to chores and such. If I could just find a way to make making things this way also be this way...moving on...

    Now, I'm not saying people will not do things that are not all three of those, but I'm saying that people will do things that are all three of those. Maybe I have defined an activity which elicits a very basic type of "flow".

    I now welcome the critical crucible of slashdot with open arms (and fireproof pants).
  • Sounds horrible (Score:5, Insightful)

    by the_scoots (1595597) on Monday March 03, 2014 @05:17PM (#46390425)

    I make games for a living, and have tried many of the gamification apps for things like household chores or which beers you've drank to see what they're like. They're a pain in the butt to enter things into and just aren't much fun IMO.

    I've seen some interesting things in education, where achievement and point systems are used to construct a less bad grading system, which is cool. But to get to 85% of daily tasks being gamified would take a ton of amazing experience design and technological advancements that I just don't see happening by 2020. Maybe more like 5% would be a more reasonable estimate.

    Also, if my HR department decides to gamify performance reviews I'm going to lose it.

    • by gtall (79522)

      However, Buzzword Bingo is a great game for CEOs as one of your contestants. Imagine this, you get team from company A and team from company B, both of whose CEOs are to speak at some bs-a-thon. Both teams get to construct their own bingo boards within certain rules, i.e., all the entries need be unique, a CEO has to utter precisely the phrase on a spot, etc. Then to make it a bit interesting, the teams get to make wagers.

      The game can be player intra-company as well. Here, we can have teams of contestants.

    • Also, if my HR department decides to gamify performance reviews I'm going to lose it.

      Mine already throws darts at a board and hopes your happy with the results.
    • Re:Sounds horrible (Score:5, Interesting)

      by jxander (2605655) on Monday March 03, 2014 @06:11PM (#46391017)

      Anecdotal, but a friend of mine is a teacher who has implemented a video-game style "points" system

      Every student starts with 0 points at the beginning of the year, and counts up from there. At the end of the semester, everything is exactly the same. Total grade is the exact same balance of homework, quizzes, tests, etc... but instead of students bouncing around (A after the first few assignments, down to a C after a bad test, up to a B in a few weeks, back down to a C after skipping some homework, etc) they just count up up up and can see each threshold as they approach it.

      Anecdotal, but he's noticed a definite improvement in overall student participation and engagement. Instead of working hard to try and maintain your grade, you're working from the ground up and can better visualize the progress.

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        Anecdotal, but a friend of mine is a teacher who has implemented a video-game style "points" system

        Every student starts with 0 points at the beginning of the year, and counts up from there. At the end of the semester, everything is exactly the same. Total grade is the exact same balance of homework, quizzes, tests, etc... but instead of students bouncing around (A after the first few assignments, down to a C after a bad test, up to a B in a few weeks, back down to a C after skipping some homework, etc) they

        • by jxander (2605655)

          Possible, but doubtful. The final is still worth a pretty large chunk of the total grade (15%, I think) so it's impossible to have an A halfway through the semester and coast to the finish.

          Also, generally the A students need less motivation. It's the C students who need help visualizing the importance of the coursework. For instance, each test is worth around 5% of the total grade. Completely bombing a few tests is worth a full letter grade. Conversely, getting an A on a test will cause a significant bu

      • Ten points to Gryffindor!
        • by jxander (2605655)

          Funny you should mention that. He and I chatted about it last night, spurred by this thread. He's actually considered a group points system as well

          It would all be one big group, to help promote class teamwork, but the concept is similar. Example : If 5 people get a perfect score on the quiz, everyone in the class gets +5 points to their total class grade. Or if no one gets an F on a test, everyone gets +10 to their overall. Even the smartest kids can't get the maximum points without helping their classm

      • My first grade teacher did that with little star stickers in relation to reading achievements. Nothing new under the sun. :)

    • by PRMan (959735)
      Already been there. It turned into a popularity contest.
    • >Also, if my HR department decides to gamify performance reviews I'm going to lose it.

      Just wait until they award you a badge instead of a raise.
      • Also, if my HR department decides to gamify performance reviews I'm going to lose it.

        Just wait until they award you a badge instead of a raise.

        "I see you've lead the department in sales this month. Here's a hat."

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      I make games for a living, and have tried many of the gamification apps for things like household chores or which beers you've drank to see what they're like. They're a pain in the butt to enter things into and just aren't much fun IMO.

      What you're saying can be summarized as "this is hard so it isn't worth doing".

      This is what passes for insightful commentary on Slashdot today?

      I know, I know, I must be new here.

      • I make games for a living, and have tried many of the gamification apps for things like household chores or which beers you've drank to see what they're like. They're a pain in the butt to enter things into and just aren't much fun IMO.

        What you're saying can be summarized as "this is hard so it isn't worth doing".

        This is what passes for insightful commentary on Slashdot today?

        I know, I know, I must be new here.

        I'm sorry that's what you gathered from my post. It's not what I wrote or intended anyone to take away.

        A better summary: Layering a game like structure on top of everyday activities has so far not produced many good experiences. Unless there are major unforeseeable advances in experience design and technology over the next couple of years, there will not be anywhere close to 85% of daily activities structured as "games".

    • by Ryanrule (1657199)

      The missing piece is the robot supervisors. Cant trust humans to record their work if there is a prize involved. Video games work because people cant cheat (so much)

  • gives a whole new meaning to the phrase

  • I can believe that 85% of productivity will be measured with metrics. But does that mean slaving away in a 110 degree warehouse [salon.com] under the very real threat of being fired if you don't hit your newly-doubled target for picking items from shelves is a game? Certainly not a fun game:

    At the Allentown warehouse, Stephen Dallal, also a "picker," found that his output targets increased the longer he worked at the warehouse, doubling after six months. "It started with 75 pieces an hour, then 100 pieces an hour. T

    • Terrible managers will determine an employee's limits by piling on work until the employee cracks under the pressure. It does tell you the employee's limit, but they don't tend to be much use after they snap.
  • When I wake up, I wanna play :

    Prince of persia (warrior within)
    some Tom Clancy splinter cell
    some Blazing Angels
    and some Vegas 2

    For a day job :)
  • I though games were _supposed_ to be fun...not feel like work!

    • It depends. Does this mean work will come with cheat codes also?

      Up-Up-Down-Down-Left-Right-Left-Right-B-A

      You've Unlocked: Infinite Salary! *goes on a spending spree*

      (Back when I played SimCity and Warcraft - pre "World Of"- I was horrible at managing resources in the game. Mainly because it always felt like work instead of fun. So I'd just use cheat codes to give myself infinite of whatever I needed and then had fun from there.)

  • by 0xdeadbeef (28836) on Monday March 03, 2014 @05:25PM (#46390503) Homepage Journal

    My tasks are already games. I push buttons for money points, and the more money points I get, the easier it is to get more money points.

    A lot of people have been saying the programmer class is overpowered, but they're usually just envious whiners who dumped all their talent points in the humanities skill tree, and then QQ when they get pwned at life. Besides, most of them borrowed money points in the tutorial levels, the noobs, and now they wonder why they can't afford the endgame gear and think we should just give it them. Can you imagine that? Welfare epics! As if!

    • by Anonymous Coward

      You win the internet for today.

  • I don't really have a comment. I'm just trying to get more Slashdot Experience Points so I can level up. Now to answer some more e-mails. I'm already a Level 11 Inbox Reply Wizard. Level 12, here I come!

  • Games are not achievements, games are not scores and character build. That's only a small subset of games, the games that I don't play. There are artistic games, action games, story-based games that don't have elements mentioned here.
  • And all medicine will come in gummy form!

  • Since I spend half my time here this place is going to have to get a lot more exciting.
    Punch the Capcha and Shoot the Trolls aren't enabled yet :/

    A new way of working with 85% uptake in 6 years?!?
    I'll have what he's having please......

  • Sayeth TFA,

    Video games are currently used in healthcare to teach some basic medical procedures, but as wearable and 3D surface technology improve, they will be used to practice complicated surgeries and medical methods.

    Those are not games. They are simulations.

    When I take a CPR class and use a mannequin to practice, is that a game? No. And it's no different than using a computer program to simulate a procedure. These are not games.

    • When I take a CPR class and use a mannequin to practice, is that a game? No.

      Unless you get points for how you give the mannequin CPR, in which case the answer is "yes." Not all games are simulations, and not all simulations are games, but the area of overlap is pretty large.

      Note that I'm not saying that making CPR classes into games is a good idea. In fact I think it's a lousy idea. But I have the feeling it's happening whether we like it ot not.

  • I stopped playing games the moment I realised how similar to working were: go to this place, speak with this person, go to this other place, kill 1000 orcs, take this object and figure out how to better fuse it with these other 7...

  • ... because Tapped Out is a lot like work. :-)

  • In general, most of the addictive games out there (from MMOs to Vegas Slot machines) utilize a version of the Skinner Box [wikipedia.org]

    I'm honestly surprised that the lessons learned there haven't been put to use in office or schools already.

  • That's what we should call it. People are getting dumber and dumber by the decade, we're being force-fed Playskool-like operating systems for computers, computers aren't even computers anymore, they're turning into high-tech Etch-a-Sketches, kids are only being taught by rote to pass pointless "standardized" tests and not ever taught to think for themselves, and now we're going to turn everything into some idiotic video game to complete humanity's descent into a pre-sapient state. Fuck this, fuck and fuck t
    • by jd2112 (1535857)

      we're being force-fed Playskool-like operating systems for computers

      Hey, Even Microsoft realized that the default color scheme in Windows XP was a bad idea.

      • by kheldan (1460303)
        Well.. even if you're just making a joke, I'm not talking about anything as cosmetic as that, and I'm not even talking about XP, but I think you know that.
        • by jd2112 (1535857)

          Well.. even if you're just making a joke, I'm not talking about anything as cosmetic as that, and I'm not even talking about XP, but I think you know that.

          It was a joke. My first reaction to Windows XP was that it looked like it was designed by Fisher-Price.

  • by David_Hart (1184661) on Monday March 03, 2014 @06:30PM (#46391269)

    ...doesn't it already have game elements?

    As a network engineer, most of my work is largely a lot like the hacking game in Bioshock where you have to move the puzzle pieces to get the path right. The only difference is today it is accomplished via text commands and physical connections. With SDN, it wouldn't surprise me that the interface changes from text based to GUI game based. Pick a packet type or subnet, drag it through a path where you want it to flow, assign a priority via colors, and then push out the routing policy... Hey, I should patent that... (evil grin)

  • I think this might work for _some_ millenials who are so used to this kind of reward system that this becomes the only way they can function in a work environment. If someone is raised on video games and collecting badges/trophies/points/whatever for doing a task, then it becomes a good workplace motivator. This would be especially true for younger software developers -- grind out this module/finish this sprint/debug this feature and receive the "Chief Debugger" badge. It could also work for mundane tasks

  • 1.) a crime
    2.) a suicide
    3.) to play a game
    4.) gamefication of others
    5.) a murder
    6.) adultery
    7.) sins only god hates
    8.) apostasy
    9.) something completly unforgiven

    10.) a big fat trolling

    has the IEEE gamyfied it's self, the troll level is on the rise,
    gamefication is on the rise!

    We have a correllation

  • ... the IEEE isn't gaming us?
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