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The Media Games

World's First Dedicated Gaming Magazine Is Facing Closure 82

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the media-is-dead dept.
mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "BBC Reports: 'Computer and Video Games, which in 1981 was the world's first magazine dedicated to gaming, is facing closure. The title, which has been online-only since 2004, may stop publishing at the end of a 45-day consultation period that began on 14 May, sources said. However, its publishers, Future, are also believed to be looking into selling off the brand. The magazine is behind the gaming industry's Golden Joystick Awards, a yearly event held since 1983. Early issues of the magazine were seen as being instrumental in helping small-time games developers to get their titles out there, said Mr Henderson — a trend that he thought was beginning to re-emerge as apps and mobile gaming have taken off.'"
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World's First Dedicated Gaming Magazine Is Facing Closure

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  • A Life Well Wasted (Score:4, Informative)

    by iMySti (863056) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:21PM (#47057757)
    If this strikes a chord with you I would recommend listening to the first episode of A Life Well Wasted, chronicling the (initial) death of Electronic Gaming Monthly. http://alifewellwasted.com/200... [alifewellwasted.com]
  • Going the way of Kilobaud Microcomputing and Byte or (sadly) Computer Language Magazine.
    • by Megane (129182)

      IMHO, Byte died long before it stopped printing. In 1987, tax laws were changing, and magazine subscriptions would no longer be a professional expense. So they offered a 6 years for $99 subscription rate, and I took it because I didn't want to have to mess with resubscribing every year. By 1993, the articles were basically all PC and MS-DOS centric (with the occasional token Mac or Amiga or Atari ST article), and a significant percentage were software reviews. The only thing left that I cared about was Jerr

  • by OzPeter (195038) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:34PM (#47057893)

    News at 5:15, 5:45, 6:10, 6:40, 7:15, 7:45, 8:30, 9:10, 9:45, 10:20, 11:30 (I watch too much CNN)

  • by Hognoxious (631665) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:35PM (#47057897) Homepage Journal

    It is re-emerging. it's just doing it via a medium that isn't measured in dead trees per lunar orbit.

    • ...dead trees per lunar orbit

      Best. UOM. Evar.

    • According to the summary they stopped using dead trees in 2004. A web site isn't a good medium for discussing the ever shifting nature of game platforms?

      • Depends on the web site, it's quality of writing and organization.

        • > it's quality of writing

          Your write their.

          • No one likes a Grammar Nazi, even when they may be right. Websites are like corporations, usage of singular and group plural differs between English speaking nations.

      • by ultranova (717540)

        A web site isn't a good medium for discussing the ever shifting nature of game platforms?

        Certainly. But what puts the CVG website above, say, Reddit in that regard? There's no obvious way to go from a magazine that's a collection of game reviews to a discussion forum, since the former is made by its staff and the latter by its members. If anything, having a pre-existing brand might make it harder to the perceived need to upkeep said brand by policing and thus limiting the discussion.

    • by Dogtanian (588974)

      It is re-emerging. it's just doing it via a medium that isn't measured in dead trees per lunar orbit.

      Good grief! Even the bleeding summary makes clear that CVG has been "online only" (i.e. a *website*) since 2004 and it's that "re-emerged" web-based version of the magazine that is now in danger.

  • by Snowgen (586732) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @12:45PM (#47058029) Homepage

    ...the world's first magazine dedicated to gaming...

    Okay, I'm being pedantic here, but this is one of my pet peeves. "Computer Gaming" is not Gaming. It is a lesser thing--a subset of the greater whole.

    This was not the first gaming magazine-- Games magazine came out in 1977 and The Dragon was in 1976. Both of these magazines were dedicated to gaming (with Games being the more general use of that term).

    Don't even get me started on calling computer games RPGs.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      A frustrating but inescapable fact about the English language is that it is a true democracy.

      The meanings of words, in common use, are defined by the vote of the masses. There is no regulatory authority that says what meanings a word can and cannot have...there are only teams of lexicographers who document the meaning-decisions that the masses have already made.

      If "RPG" refers to a type of computer game these days, then that's what it means now. Maybe it didn't use to, but it does now.

      Incidentally, "irony

  • What is this "magazine" of which you speak?

    • It's an add thing, I found the lack of magazines in the US really weird when I was over there and that was 15+ years ago. They only seemed to be in bookshops. Over in the UK, they're everywhere and hundreds of different ones. Newsagents, super markets, petrol stations, music shops, pretty much everywhere except book shops.
      • add thing/odd thing.
      • by Bigbutt (65939)

        Well supermarkets certainly still carry magazines. Gas stations and convenience stores also have a small magazine rack. Music shops don't seem to carry any though (I'm thinking instrument shops and not places where you buy CDs). Book shops seem to have the largest selection of magazines though. Most places have a pretty common set of magazines though. I pick up 2600, various music specific magazines, some science type magazines, and an English motorcycle magazine or two if they're available.

        [John]

      • by operagost (62405)
        Maybe you should have tried leaving the airport on your layover. No magazines in news stands or gas stations? You sound like that Brit who claimed we only had American cheese in our supermarkets.
        • Yeah, thanks for the snark. I've been over a few times and traveled there a lot, either driving around the east coat or staying in cities. Either way, I found magazines pretty scarce compared to what I was used to.
      • Re:Magazine? (Score:4, Informative)

        by BasilBrush (643681) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @02:48PM (#47059319)

        It's an explainable thing. The UK magazines market was largely driven by W H Smith. Not only because of their shops, but they were a wholesaler too, so a lot of the other newsagents were selling merchandise sourced from W H Smith.

        And W H Smith started out as a chain of railway station concessions. People bought books and magazines to read on the train.

        With a lesser railway system, and more people travelling by horse and then car in the USA, the train station bookstall/newsagent phenomenon didn't take off in the same way.

        Or at least that's my theory.

      • It's an add thing, I found the lack of magazines in the US really weird when I was over there and that was 15+ years ago.

        We drive, it's a thing, so no buying a magazine to read on the tube/train/bus. Plenty of stores carry a few, but the largest selection are in bookstores.

        We think the "social drinking at pubs, not at home" thing is odd.

        And the "Linux User groups meet up at pubs" thing is odd too.

        Don't you people socialize and/or drink at home?

        • We think the "social drinking at pubs, not at home" thing is odd.

          In the UK, drinking at home might be considered tantamount to alcoholism. Binge drinking in pubs is far more socially acceptable. Work that one out!

  • For me, Metacritic replaces any "IGN, Gamespot, CVG" review.
    Metacritic might be full of "fake and childish" user scores, but overall, the user scores are alot more accurate than the "paid for" reviews most websites dish out.

    Welcome to the future, more honest and free.

    • by DrGamez (1134281)

      Where does Metacritic get those reviews from?

    • by Mashiki (184564)

      Ah metacritic, where the reviews come from exactly the same websites that you say it's replaced. And the user scores are easily trolled into oblivion.

      • Ah metacritic, where the reviews come from exactly the same websites that you say it's replaced.

        Take note, my post clearly states user reviews.

        And the user scores are easily trolled into oblivion.

        Which overall are more trustworthy than a paid for review by IGN/CVG.

  • by clickclickdrone (964164) on Wednesday May 21, 2014 @01:45PM (#47058611)
    I started getting C&VG from the first issue. Back then they were mainly a magazine full of BASIC listings for the Atari 800, BBC, Apple, TRS80, MZ80K, ZX81 etc. They also had ongoing tutorials on adventure game writing and the like. More bizarrely, they also had a play by mail space game, which I never played (had to pay as I remember) which featured every issue. You posted your next moves and got a computer print out of the results a few weeks later. You thought waiting for cassettes to load was slow gameplay? Pah! For me though, it was key. I first learned programming by typing in the Atari 800 listings (which never worked first time) by checking the typos then working out 'ah, that must be what changes the colour of the border' etc. Between the monthly listings and a BASIC primer, I was away. Later on I moved onto 6502 assembler and later C once I had an Atari ST. Somehow that chain of events resulted in me writing systems generating millions in revenue for banks. Thanks C&VG! I did stop getting the magazine after a few years but decided to submit a game I had in mind. I pulled out all the stops, wanting it to be the best Atari game they'd published. It had (ignore if you're not an Atari 8bit type) multiple DLIs, redefined character sets, sprites, assembler subroutines and all sorts of twiddly things. I then went and bought an issue to get the address to send my masterpiece to. Arse, they'd stopped doing listings several issues earlier. :-(
    • "You posted your next moves and got a computer print out of the results a few weeks later. You thought waiting for cassettes to load was slow gameplay?"

      Ah, our age is showing....I once played chess with my best friend via postcard when I moved out of state years ago (towards the end of the Mesozoic era...). That game took nearly two years to complete.

      I consider it a high point in gaming for me. It was the finest play either of us ever accomplished, as we had a lot of time to consider moves. It ended in a dr
  • I have my stacks of C&VG stored on one of my shelves. Got close to 90% of the issues I think.

    They really were something else. The writing on the longer pieces was top notch, and the news and previews had lots of exclusives. They had really connected writers. And those front pages... best ever.
    The 90s were not too kind to it as it had to fight more kiddy targeting publications and all the media was fed through the same hose. At least we got Edge from then on.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    http://www.64apocalypse.com/images/cvg/mag1.htm

    Hopefully they don't get slashdotted. Wow, was it really 30 years ago that I started typiing in games by hand from this magazine.... then realised that I could modify and adapt them the more I leant about BASIC. Result : 20 year career in IT coming up this July.

HELP!!!! I'm being held prisoner in /usr/games/lib!

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