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Street Fighter V Announced For Linux and SteamOS 126

An anonymous reader writes: Capcom has announced that their upcoming Street Fighter V game, one of the most anticipated games for 2016, will also be available for SteamOS and Linux. Already in place is support functionality for the Steam Controller, Valve's game controller that was recently updated with some new features. Ever since Valve launched Steam for Linux, the number of native Linux games has positively exploded. But will it be enough for gamers to choose a Linux distribution as their gaming platform?
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Street Fighter V Announced For Linux and SteamOS

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Now we are talking serious games shit for my Linux. We rule! FINALLY!

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      I dunno about that. The most difficult thing about gaming on Linux is that troubleshooting is HARD. For example, imagine running a game and it doesn't even start, it just spits out the message "segmentation fault". Uh yeah...let me just type that into google...and...nope, just a vague description of a memory error. What could be wrong? Well, a lot of fucking things to be honest.

      Don't get me wrong, I use Linux every day (and in fact admin at least 20 of Linux servers) and it's a wonderful kernel for server O

      • Re:Yippie! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Microlith ( 54737 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @02:50AM (#51148857)

        I dunno about that. The most difficult thing about gaming on Linux is that troubleshooting is HARD. For example, imagine running a game and it doesn't even start, it just spits out the message "segmentation fault". Uh yeah...let me just type that into google...and...nope, just a vague description of a memory error. What could be wrong? Well, a lot of fucking things to be honest.

        And yet right now, on Windows, the SF5 beta is crashing for me. There's even less I can do because there are no messages at all.

        Worse, Ultra Street Fighter 4 randomly crashes out on me. No errors, no messages. Just up and vanishes mid-game. Other games give me, occasionally, random crash dialogs. So I doubt the troubleshooting situation can truly be worse on Linux.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        There are other problems. Like the lack of a common unified installation system requiring me to find specific installation packages that may or may not exist for my distro, or when you go fullscreen tabbing back to the desktop isn't always possible without exiting the game, or when critical libraries are required but my system can't fulfill the dependencies properly for one reason or another. Or when my kernel gets updated and then video drivers fail compilation for some reason. It's he little things tha

        • by tepples ( 727027 )

          Street Fighter V Announced For Linux and SteamOS

          Like the lack of a common unified installation system requiring me to find specific installation packages that may or may not exist for my distro

          If a Linux game uses Steam Runtime and is greenlit for distribution through the Steam store, this common unified installation system is called Steam.

      • You seem to confuse SteamOS with Steam runtime. Steam runtime is, as you noted, a common set of libraries, while SteamOS I'd a distribution, so it unifies everything, from the kernel, through libraries, a compositor, to the unified user interface.
        Yes, just having a standard set of libraries is not enough, this is why Valve removed Tux icon or the whole Linux platform support concept from their store: they just cannot guarantee that a game will work on any weird Linux setup out there. Even Ubuntu (ie the onl

        • Your statement seems rather misleading, it seems to imply they dropped Linux support.

        • by aliquis ( 678370 )

          I assume if one use Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, Redhat or OpenSUSE chances are decent that it works, most so with Ubuntu, but also if Steam become a major title on those OSes maybe they'd take greater care in not breaking it.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Have you been living under a rock or something? All the non-technical users are running an Ubuntu derived distribution and within that it's 99% the same. Supporting outside the hardware realm is really a non-issue at this point. There really are no other distributions of significance outside the Ubuntu derived distribution realm and so everybody supports it. I do support for a living (ie head guy here) too, know what I'm talking about, and we don't just support one distribution either, but anything and ever

        • by Anonymous Coward

          No, all the non-technical users are still using Windows. The technical users without a deep technical understanding of Linux are running Ubuntu. Non-technical users don't care about your idiological reasons for shunning operating system X, Y, or Z - they just want specific programs to work and their OS to be easy to use.

      • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        There are some various problems with getting things to work well in Linux, like drivers and audio problems (but much fewer than there used to be). But what you're calling out here has really nothing to do specifically with Linux. I've had games crash, typically with a seg fault, in Windows, OSX, Linux, and Android. Troubleshooting is typically near impossible in all of them unless you've come across a bug where it does it every after a very specific action. Game just crashes to desktop in Windows? Your

      • by epyT-R ( 613989 )

        Yeah.. like all those games on windows that mysteriously crash to desktop with only a 'this application crashed' logged in system logs.

        Debugging is hard regardless of os.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 19, 2015 @02:00AM (#51148757)

    Meh, you really need a 6 button controller for Street Fighter. The 6 button Genesis was the best hand held controller ever.

    • by Z80a ( 971949 )

      There are quite a few ways to plug a six button sega genesis controller, or even a sega saturn controller to a PC and play the newfangled games with it.

    • by ledow ( 319597 )

      Gosh. Guess Valve bringing out a Steam controller with all kinds of customisability and the ability to have as many buttons as you like (customisable pads, shoulder buttons, etc.) is a waste of time then?

      Or you could plug in an XBox 360 controller - the USB adaptors for the PC are literally a few pence now - and have four buttons, four shoulders, D-pad, two thumbsticks, etc.?

      Steam know that some things are keyboard/mouse, some are joystick, some are "joypad" (as they were called in my day) and some are ste

    • Meh, you really need a 6 button controller for Street Fighter. The 6 button Genesis was the best hand held controller ever.

      Meh, you really need a stick for Street Fighter. The only D-Pad that doesn't suck is the one on the original NES. Every other one, it's too easy to input a diagonal when you want a straight. The Famicom D-Pad was flimsy, so the NES really wins the "only good dpad" contest... fucking patents

      • by KGIII ( 973947 )

        I used to put my two quarters in and play for hours as people would come try to win. Gimme the stand-up and we'll talk. Technically, I have a cabinet and the boards (no screen) and whatnot. However, that's to be a MAME box some day. Errr... I've been saying that for like ten years now. That day doesn't appear to be getting closer.

      • The NES wasn't without flaw. It was perfect when it was new - but enough use and it would eventually wear to the point that left and right or up and down could be pressed simultaneously. Some games really didn't like that.

    • by jedidiah ( 1196 )

      I already have two of those I use with Linux already.

  • by JanneM ( 7445 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @02:08AM (#51148771) Homepage

    I play games on Linux. I loved the Portal games, and I'm spending more time than is perhaps good for me in Kerbal Space Program. Got XCOM waiting for me once I take a break from KSP. On my laptop I play FTL, and I've slowly playing through Baldurs Gate; something fun to do during business trips.

    If I didn't have these games on Linux, I would not be playing on Windows. Dual-booting is completely impractical, since you'd have to close your work and shut down just to play a game. I'd not use Windows; I'd probably just get a game console instead. Or be content with the games I can play on my tablet. Without Linux games, I would not be playing PC games at all.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    they're not over extending themselves too much by making a version for linux, unreal engine 4 makes it easier for them to do this

  • by cfalcon ( 779563 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @03:26AM (#51148951)

    > But will it be enough for gamers to choose a Linux distribution as their gaming platform?

    That's not the point of putting a game on Linux. What this means is that, if you are running Linux, you can play this game. This is GREAT news. The issue facing Linux gamers isn't that there are no good games- it's that of the games made, many never get a Linux version. This is a great game that is getting a Linux version. That's seriously cool!

    Most gamers have at least one game that they can't make work on Linux- this means that Street Fighter V will NOT be one of those annoying games. Solid.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Can anyone comment on the porting process? Presumably games based on common on engines are not too much work, but what about custom engines and reliance on DX to look good?

      And what about DRM that normally uses horrible Windows drivers?

      • Custom engines are so XX century!
      • I think the DRM might be a bit less important than it used to be, with so much distribution going through Steam now and the multiplayer/DLC rising in importance.

        As someone involved in the piracy community for many years, I've seen Steam do some serious damage. It makes obtaining a game legitimately so convenient and affordable, people aren't torrenting like they used to. If it's too expensive people will just wait for the sale or for the price to fall, or buy one of the thousands of more affordable games th

        • by tepples ( 727027 )

          As someone involved in the piracy community for many years, I've seen Steam do some serious damage. It makes obtaining a game legitimately so convenient and affordable, people aren't torrenting like they used to.

          So are more people torrenting games that aren't yet available on Steam?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    But will it be enough for gamers to choose a Linux distribution as their gaming platform?

    For some gamers, no. Not at all.

    For some: If this generates additional FPS, then, yes. Will they replace Windows? Nah. But will they boot up Linux to confirm reports that they can get superior performance? If so, then yes.

    Doesn't matter whether they will actually be able to see a difference from the FPS. If reports say there's something better, then some gamers will spend the time to try it out.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Gamers are, in the main, a tech-savvy crowd. Isn't Linux ideal for them? They can tweak it to their hearts content, ripping that last bit of speed out of things. Saying that Linux is too technical for them does seem a little insulting given that a lot of PC gamers build their rigs from scratch.

    So, imo, there has to be something else going on. Such as MS's stranglehold on the OEMs who produce the graphics cards and drivers. That's about the only substantial reason why games weren't that popular on Linux.

    This

    • Gamers are, in the main, a tech-savvy crowd.

      No, they really aren't... Read some gaming forums, the basic questions asked every day indicate that plenty of non-techies love to play games...

      Isn't Linux ideal for them?

      No... Windows, you run it, you run your game, it works.

      Linux? Not so much. Maybe it works, depending on too many different things.

      Saying that Linux is too technical for them does seem a little insulting given that a lot of PC gamers build their rigs from scratch.

      No they don't. The number of people who build their own computer is a very, very, very small percentage of the total number of computers, even those used for gaming.

      The majority buy a CyberPower PC or an Alienware or just a Dell/HP/A

    • by epyT-R ( 613989 )

      If this was the 80s and 90s, I'd agree. Today's gamers aren't much more clued in than their non gaming peers. It's too bad.

  • "one of the most anticipated games for 2016"
    Being unable to play most games because I haven't had a Windows machine for years or a decent console for that matter(thinking about buying one for fallout 4) , I haven't followed the game news in years.
    But it sounds like 2016 will be a slow game year.

  • When launching a Steam game, namely the old Counterstrike it launches on the left monitor instead of the right one. Wine + Warcraft 3 launches on the monitor I want to use - but with that one, don't dare trying alt-tab!

    See, I don't really want to spend $500 on new hardware and risk ending up with the same bugs, while not being able to play fun games I know about (like say, Painkiller which is old but was fun except for the slow downs. Or games like Crysis 1 and Stalker which seemed good but were too slow)

    Fo

  • by HalAtWork ( 926717 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @01:35PM (#51150489)

    It's being developed for a non-DirectX *nix based platform with common architecture compared to the PC. Makes me wonder why more PS4 games don't make it to Linux? Probably because it costs money, but surely it's easier than bringing PS4 games to Windows. I guess we just need a larger Linux/SteamOS install base.

    • by tepples ( 727027 )

      Makes me wonder why more PS4 games don't make it to Linux?

      Because SCE-owned developers and those taking an exclusivity subsidy from SCE make more money when you buy SCE's console and then buy more games for SCE's console after that. Or because OpenGL isn't the only API you need to use to get a game onto a platform, and a lot of engines support the proprietary Orbis APIs but not things like PulseAudio, X11, /dev/input/event*, and some non-SCE networking and matchmaking framework.

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