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Classic Games (Games) First Person Shooters (Games) Graphics Open Source Programming Games

'Serious Sam 1' Engine Released As Open Source 82

jones_supa writes: id Software is well known for publicly releasing the source code of its old first-person-shooter games. Now Croteam is joining the club by releasing the source code of the engine of the very first Serious Sam game. It's the very same engine that the company used for Serious Sam Classic: The First Encounter and The Second Encounter. Croteam's Vyacheslav Nikitenko, who worked on the source code and prepared Serious Engine v.1.10 for this release, had this to say: "Historically, this version of Serious Engine is very important for Croteam and for me personally. I created several mods for Serious Sam back in the day, before even starting the work on the source code, and it was a great tool for learning. And it's even better today! Obviously, Serious Engine v1.10 won't produce top-notch graphics, but the source code is very well commented, easy to modify, and there are lots of user generated mods out there. This version has everything you need to build your own game – or just experiment. If you're looking to get started, just download the files from GitHub and head over to SeriousZone, it has a great community and lots of tutorials." Happy hacking! (And here's a video with some game play that shows what this engine can do.)
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'Serious Sam 1' Engine Released As Open Source

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  • by creimer ( 824291 ) on Friday March 11, 2016 @05:28PM (#51680975) Homepage
    I never gotten into Serious Sam back in the day. Probably because of the endless hoard of enemies that keep on coming and coming and coming. A guy needs to rest between repeated comings, especially as he gets older.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      ^ Minute Man spotted.

    • by epyT-R ( 613989 )

      so says 'creimer'

      • by creimer ( 824291 )
        You know you're getting popular on Slashdot is when the ACs start trolling you on a regular basis.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Hmm .. MSVC 2013 or MSVC 2015, DirectX8, GPLv2 ...

    Looks useless!

  • Learn with it. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by e r ( 2847683 ) on Friday March 11, 2016 @05:51PM (#51681155)
    Want a job in the gaming industry? Make a mod or make improvements to an open source game engine and instantly impress at the job interview. (ioQuake3, ioDoom3, Irrlicht, Unreal 4, Unity, etc. and now Serious Sam)

    Want to build a therapy tool or viz tool or prototype but don't want to re-invent the wheel? Use an existing engine. (see above)

    Thank you, id, Croteam, Epic, and others for your generosity. Stuff like this helps keep up the momentum of innovation and drives human progress forward.

    Don't misunderstand me, though: I think it's perfectly appropriate to charge money for software. A man/woman has gotta eat!
    • Want a job in the gaming industry?

      To get paid shit and treated like shit? Yeah, sign me up!!

      • Law of supply and demand, my friend, law of supply and demand.
        • "Sucker born every minute" is a perfect description of the long line of people who think they want to be game programmers. Unless you're a Carmack, there's no really no point unless you're in to being shit upon.

      • To get paid shit and treated like shit? Yeah, sign me up!!

        Depends where. I'm in a cow-orking space where an independent mobile game developer has one of the private offices. I often chat to the various staff members over tea or coffee since the kitchenette is shared. They seem pretty happy to me. I don't know what the pay is like though.

        Not all game shops are EA-like meat grinders. Some of the are ex-EA. Apparently it's not as bad as you hear about online, I got told, before being told about perma-crunches,

    • You forgot Lumberyard.

      • Yeah, when Amazon actually makes something interesting with Lumberyard, then you can add it to the list.
    • by creimer ( 824291 )

      Want a job in the gaming industry? Make a mod or make improvements to an open source game engine and instantly impress at the job interview.

      I doubt that will work in Las Vegas. Their gaming industry is a little bit different.

    • Want a job in the gaming industry?

      Hell no.

      (And because my parents were married, I can't be in Marketing either.)

    • But not everyone is a (wo)man. I am an ant! :P

  • by Anonymous Coward

    There are plenty of open source 3D engines. What makes this one different on a technical level? What is its historical significance? What are the things it's good at? What are its flaws?

    • You seem to be clueless about the game at hand. Perhaps this is research you should be doing on your own.
    • There are plenty of open source 3D engines. What makes this one different on a technical level?

      It runs Serious Sam and those others engine don't?

    • It's very efficient. Not only does it support enormous levels with tremendous draw distance, and not only does it handle enormous enemy counts, it does all this while supporting four player on one PC splitscreen.

      And it does all this on what was modest hardware at the time.

      Serious Sam's poly counts per enemy were never the highest, but when you throw entire mobs of them on the screen without slowdown, it gets impressive.

      I recall a user-made level that was just one big field with the player, a minigun, ammo s

      • I recall a user-made level that was just one big field with the player, a minigun, ammo spawns, and one thousand enemies. In one wave. And the engine handled it.

        Wow! Sounds like nuts.wad has found its true spiritual home. Anyone else remember that one?

  • Maybe someone can open source the code for Arkham Knight so modders can finally make it work.

  • This engine had features that you simply could not find in other engines of the day. Multiple gravity sources, real-time visibility to other parts of a map, extremely round objects, the ability to handle 50+ enemies on the screen at once (with zero slowdown), ability to handle huge outdoor areas.

    You could do things with the Serious Engine that would make the Quake, Half-Life, and Unreal engines choke, at best.

    And it still looks pretty good today. The guys at Croteam did a phenomenal job.

    • Multiple gravity sources

      That was one that blew me away when I first played it. That cylindrical room that you could run up the sides freely in. The only other FPS I've seen to do anything like that was Prey.

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