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Microsoft XBox (Games) Games

Xbox Project Scorpio's Full Specs Revealed (eurogamer.net) 135

Microsoft unveiled last year that it will be launching a super-specced Xbox One variant -- codenamed Project Scorpio -- soon. Now the company has shared what those hardware modules look like. According to a report on Eurogamer, which visited Microsoft campus at the company's invitation, the specs of Project Scorpio are:

1. Project Scorpio has 12GB of DDR5 RAM, clocked at 6.8GHz with 326 GB/s bandwidth.
2. Scorpio will be powered by eight CPU cores. It's a custom design sporting 2.3GHz, with a 4MB L2 cache.
3. Project Scorpio will feature an internal PSU (245W) and a compact design, leveraging the advanced cooling techniques pioneered by Microsoft's leading industrial design team.
4. Project Scorpio will achieve six-teraflops of GPU power using a customized design, with 1.172 GHz, 40 compute units, leveraging features from AMD's Polaris architecture.
5. Scorpio will retain the Xbox One S 4K UHD Blu-ray drive.
6. Scorpio will have both HDMI-in and out, 3x USB 3.0, a SPDIF digital audio port, an IR receiver/blaster, and will support Kinect with a USB adapter.

From the report: We saw a Forza Motorsport demo running on the machine at native 4K and Xbox One equivalent settings, and it hit 60 frames per second with a substantial performance overhead -- suggesting Scorpio will hit its native 4K target across a range of content, with power to spare to spend on other visual improvements. And while 4K is the target, Microsoft is paying attention to 1080p users, promising that all modes will be available to them.
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Xbox Project Scorpio's Full Specs Revealed

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  • Microsoft is paying attention to 1080p users, promising that all modes will be available to them.

    Meaning what?

    Also, 6.8GHz on the RAM? Goddamn.

    • Re:1080P 'modes'? (Score:5, Informative)

      by klingens ( 147173 ) on Thursday April 06, 2017 @10:24AM (#54185055)

      That's GDDR5 so it will be counted as quadpumped. In reality it's 1700MHz, slightly slower than a 170€ RX 470 right now. At the stated throughput it's 384bit wide which is fairly obvious with 12GB of RAM.
      40CUs with Polaris CUs means 8 more than a RX 470, but it only has "some Polaris features", not all apparently, no real Polaris level GPU then. RX470 has 4960 GFLOPS with 1206MHz clock, so this one will be clocked at ~1150 or less to be able to reach 6000 GFLOPS (they like to add in the few GFLOPS of the CPU cores to inflate the numbers). A RX 480 you can buy off the shelf usually reaches 6000 GFLOPS too.
      The CPU seems to be the same higher clocked Jaguar core, same cores just with more L2 cache than before.

      So: the original XBox One was a Kabini 8 Core with a DDR3 crippled Radeon 7850, the new one is a tweaked Kabini with a beefier RX 480 videocard and finally decent RAM for its purpose.

      • So: the original XBox One was a Kabini 8 Core with a DDR3 crippled Radeon 7850, the new one is a tweaked Kabini with a beefier RX 480 videocard and finally decent RAM for its purpose.

        Xbox One GPU is a DDR3 crippled 7750-7770. It was the original PS4 that had a 7850-7870.

      • by aliquis ( 678370 )

        Unless AMD is very quick with implementing DDR5... But it seem weird and I assume they mean GDDR 5 too.

        A lower clocked Ryzen 7 1700 with RX 480 would cost ~$500 right now and then there's everything else so a good deal.

        Weird PCs doesn't do better with multi-core designs considering how the consoles are speced.

      • That's GDDR5 so it will be counted as quadpumped. In reality it's 1700MHz

        Ah, of course. Thanks.

    • Having read the Eurogamer/Digital Foundry articles, the quote you pick out appears to mean that users with 1080p displays will be able to enable supersampling, where the console renders an image at 4k but then displays it over a 1080p output.

      It's basically a very, very resource heavy version of antialiasing and has been available in many PC games for years now.

  • 12GB over how many channels?

    • Dual Channel gives less than a 5% performance increase over single-channel RAM. It's almost always better to skip the DC kit in favor of just more RAM.

    • GDDR5 (I have to imagine DDR5 was a misprint) has a 32-bit wide memory controller. It then gets the bandwidth by stacking those in parallel. So 384-bit = 12 32-bit controllers.

  • 4. Project Scorpio will achieve six-teraflops of GPU power using a customized design, with 1,172 GHz, 40 compute units, leveraging features from AMD's Polaris architecture.

    Can someone who does GPU architecture confirm whether this is a) a typo, b) for real, or c) proof that Microsoft has finally invented a time machine, but is using it to do some oddly mundane shit?**

    **Compared to, you know, going back and killing Hitler or snapping a selfie with Actual Jesus.

  • Hopefully the new Xbox will be less redundant than the including "Scorpio" in each one of the OPs specification points 1-6

    The only informative part of this news is Forza does 60fps.

    What about what really counts? VR performance.

  • Please do tell me about this custom CPU.... Are we talking custom core desgin.. but stays true to the x86-64 instruction set? Otherwise I hear backwards compat complaints again
    • Even if it adds instructions, so what? A game targetting both platforms would need to be developed with both platforms in mind.

      • by Altrag ( 195300 )

        Backwards compatibility is for looking backwards. Its not about new games that can (and almost certainly would be) be cross-compiled, its about old games and not having to keep two consoles taking up space and standby power if it can be done by one and so on.

        If they're purely adding instructions then that's almost certainly not a problem. But if they're removing or changing existing instructions, then all old games would have at least a chance of failing (how big a chance depends on which instructions and

        • Oh, right. I think the probability of them removing instructions is close to nil.

          I hope there's no modern games out there that use busy-loop timing

          Agreed it's not likely. The Xbox One S had a slightly greater GPU clock-speed, so non-uniformity in the Xbox One platform isn't totally new.

  • ...for the Hank Scorpio jokes. I'm leaving disappointed.

    If you need me, I'll be in my hammock.
  • Will it support 3rd party hardware? Lots of VR headsets are coming. Microsoft promises support in Windows. How will they manage the drivers in a console?
  • Supposedly, It will have "the advanced cooling techniques pioneered by Microsoft's leading industrial design team.".

    Would be the industrial design team responsible for the Metro Interface? The design team responsible for the insufficient cooling on the Xbox360 that gave birth to the infamous RRODs? Perhaps the design team that thought that huge, hot power bricks were a good idea?

    I'm far from favourably impressed by Microsoft's Design teams.

    • Hardware... Software... Totally the same, I see why you might be confused (my sarcasm filter is broken today, so it doesn't register for me. So sad)

    • Going from TFA, it appears to refer to vapour-chamber cooling. Now that's not actually an MS innovation; it's already in use on tech such as very high-end PC graphics cards (it's on the Nvidia 1080 Ti in my PC). But this is probably the first time it's been used in a piece of mass-market hardware like this.

  • It's Microsoft we're talking about here. MS is notorious for promising vaporware so people wait for its product and don't buy an already existing one on the promise that Really Soon Now (tm) they can buy the MS equivalent.

    I'll judge those specs when the console ships. Until then, you can promise 8k gaming and 512gigs of ram. Hell, I can promise you that. Sure, the console will ship in 2026, but you only asked for the specs, not when it's available.

  • Shouldn't it be GlobEx? They could put Homer Simpson in charge of it, if Hank Scorpio is too busy!

  • "and it hit 60 frames per second with a substantial performance overhead" - What does that even mean, a "performance overhead"?

    • by ChoGGi ( 522069 )

      I assume it means staying at 60 rather than dipping below during busy scenes (it could average above 60, but it's locked at 60).

  • Can you install linux on it?

  • 480 has 36 units (AMD's "Polaris" chip, competitor of 6Gb version of 1060)

    PS4 Pro has kinda weaker 470 (no serious competition on nVidia side, price wise it is close to 1050Ti, but it is 30% faster)

    CPU is still Jaguar, although on a new process node and much higher clocks.

    All in all, it is a faster than PS4 Pro "Xbox One Pro" from Microsoft.

    Much more serious jumps will become possible in 2019, when Zen and Vega mature.

  • I'm no chip designer, but wouldn't this destroy any current Apple offering short of the mostly defunct Mac Pro?

    I mean, yeah, the i7 MBPs go up to 3.6Ghz, but the vast majority are dual core.

  • On the high end it's already outperformed by even a 1070, and launching expensive as a premium system, and is restricted by a software library that must remain compatible with the 1.3 tflop Xbox One. Developers won't want to be designing two discrete games. The system also barely has time to get off the ground before the next generation of consoles expected in 2019, or at the very least Sony's 3 year follow up to the PS4 Pro (which came 3 years after the PS4), whatever form that will take.

    It doesn't seem li

  • So, basically, it will be of the same performance as a current decent gaming PC.

        Da Hell?

        NVidia GTX 1070 is at 6.5 TFlops.

    • by Altrag ( 195300 )

      And at 245W. That's the part that really boggles me. Its difficult to find a graphics card that requires less than 300W, and gaming-quality cards seem to bottom out around 400-450W. Some of the top end cards are looking at 750W. The 1070 you bring up is 500W.
      (Recommended system PSU according to http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm [realhardtechx.com].)

      So they've either gone to great lengths to reduce power consumption, or your average gaming PC is running with some serious inefficiencies (

      • PC gamers are notorious for overestimating power supply requirements. The wattage craze is completely unwarranted UNLESS you overclock. At stock clocks, the cards are actually pretty power efficient. See this graph [tpucdn.com] for example. Under max load, a GTX 1070 draws maybe 150W by itself. Combine that with a 65W TDP CPU (e.g. Core i5 7600 [intel.com]) and you're only at 215W at max load. Add in 5W for memory and 15W for the HDD and you can still fit yourself into 235W, 10W less than 245W. Now consider that the XBox Scorpio's
  • My current Kinect is broken. Review randomly in just dance. Wondering if I should invest in a replacement one or wait.

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