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New Study Which Made 90 Adults Play 'GTA' or 'The Sims 3' For At least 30 Mins Every Day For 2 Months Finds 'No Significant Changes' in Their Behavior (arstechnica.com) 193

A new, longer-term study of video game play from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Germany's University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf recently published in Molecular Psychiatry found that adults showed "no significant changes" on a wide variety of behavioral measures after two straight months of daily violent game play. From a report: To correct for the "priming" effects inherent in these other studies, researchers had 90 adult participants play either Grand Theft Auto V or The Sims 3 for at least 30 minutes every day over eight weeks (a control group played no games during the testing period). The adults chosen, who ranged from 18 to 45 years old, reported little to no video game play in the previous six months and were screened for pre-existing psychological problems before the tests. The participants were subjected to a wide battery of 52 established questionnaires intended to measure "aggression, sexist attitudes, empathy, and interpersonal competencies, impulsivity-related constructs (such as sensation seeking, boredom proneness, risk taking, delay discounting), mental health (depressivity, anxiety) as well as executive control functions." The tests were administered immediately before and immediately after the two-month gameplay period and also two months afterward, in order to measure potential continuing effects. Over 208 separate comparisons (52 tests; violent vs. non-violent and control groups; pre- vs. post- and two-months-later tests), only three subjects showed a statistically significant effect of the violent gameplay at a 95 percent confidence level.
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New Study Which Made 90 Adults Play 'GTA' or 'The Sims 3' For At least 30 Mins Every Day For 2 Months Finds 'No Significant Chan

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  • by humankind ( 704050 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:06PM (#56281327) Journal

    I'm not concerned with video games changing peoples' behavior, turning normal people into psychopaths.

    What I would like to see studied, is the potential for video games to make psychopathic and sociopathic people more efficient in their anti-social abilities.

    For example, I don't think playing ultra-realistic first person shooters will necessarily make anyone want to go out and shoot someone, but it seems to me, if you're a psychopath and you're into those games, they can train you to be a much more efficient psychopath when it comes time to assaulting a school or public place.

    • by gurps_npc ( 621217 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:11PM (#56281341) Homepage

      That is quite honestly ridiculous. Most video games are not based on real world physics in part because real world physics is boring. Who wants to play a game where you have to carry all the bullets you fire? Nobody wants to reload that often.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        That is quite honestly ridiculous. Most video games are not based on real world physics in part because real world physics is boring. Who wants to play a game where you have to carry all the bullets you fire? Nobody wants to reload that often.

        You sound like a person who hasn't actually played a FPS game in at least two decades.

        FPS games today thrive on realism, from the weapons used to the world maps modeled to exacting standards of accuracy. Movement is not as accurate (people don't run and jump everywhere) but there's more realism than you think.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          While you may learn tactics from video games you won't learn to aim or reload. When it comes down to it you'd be better off with paintball for learning tactics and learning to drive a dumptruck if you just want to kill people.

        • by Junta ( 36770 )

          The realism of aiming with a mouse or worse yet, a joypad.

          Even in Oculus touch games that have you actually 'aim', generally there's a lot of auto-aim going on.

          No, the games are designed for people to have fun and *feel* like they are better than they are (because requiring the same precision as real world would just be tiresome).

          They are designed to *seem* real but not at all be useful.

        • FPS games today thrive on realism

          lol. Good one. Yeah, in real life, the best way to make the enemy miss you is by jumping up and down.

        • by guruevi ( 827432 )

          Not quite realistic though. The physics and graphics improved but you almost always play a superhero space-marine bullet-sponge with near perfect aim and no issues of bodily function, exhaustion or ill effects from environment, exposure or combat.

          A true combat simulator would be boring and 99% of people wouldn't make it 5 minutes into the first fight (if one even popped up). Unlike what most people believe, firing a fully automatic weapon is hard, expensive and requires a lot of training, even a handgun is

          • even one guard or police officer, trained in close quarter combat in the school would stop them dead in their tracks.

            Unless, of course, they decided they were too close to retirement to bother.

        • They are anything but realistic. Go check the war videos out on Youtube. Most times it's people firing at someone they can't see cause they are hidden and too far away and you have to call for fire support to smoke them out.

          No one ever runs around shooting like in FPS games

        • Almost all FPS games are categorically *not* sims - they don't attempt to model loading characteristics of weapons or the act of actually shooting. We aren't talking flight sims here - which *do* attempt to accurately cover the process of flight and specific aircraft - after all you're fiddling with a keyboard and mouse or a game controller. The sad reality is that if you want to learn how to shoot, in the US at least you go out and buy a gun and start shooting. How anyone can suggest playing an Xbox someho

        • If you'd ever been into MUD's, you'd know that increased realism... doesn't necessarily make things more realistic.
      • Its not he physics, its the p ushing someone close to the edge over it.

      • You do realize the military uses FPS games to train soldiers?

      • Most video games are not based on real world physics in part because real world physics is boring. Who wants to play a game where you have to carry all the bullets you fire? Nobody wants to reload that often.

        I am currently waiting in the queue for Armored Warfare, a Free-to-Pay game in which you drive nominally realistic armored military vehicles around and shoot at other vehicles. Your ammunition loadout and reload times are realistic, if nothing else is... The last game I was very good at was Tactical Ops, a terrorist/counter-terrorist mod for Unreal Tournament. In both of these games, there are realistic ballistics physics including drop and lead. And before that, it was Mechwarrior IV, where you not only ha

        • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

          First test for armour training, put you inside one and bash on the hatch and see if you are claustrophobic. A toy one you play with is nothing like the real thing that can kill you if you are stupid, is cold as bitch or hot as hell and noisy as fuck, and most surfaces will hurt like bitch when you bump them and it sucks hard after a week. APCs are better than tanks as long as you don't have to share them with grunts, then you have much more space. A game like the real military, hmm, boring as fuck most of t

          • A toy one you play with is nothing like the real thing that can kill you if you are stupid

            What war games have taught me is that war is shitty because even when I am kicking ass I still only win about 80% of the time. That last 20% is a bitch when it kills you.

            A game like the real military, hmm, boring as fuck most of the time, putting up with douche bag failed jockstraps all of the time, with intermittent periods of life or death depending upon how fucking murderously crazy your government, woohoo, what fun.

            My father was a marine ATC in Korea. He told me in no uncertain terms that he regretted signing up, and that I should never enlist. Much of his advice was bullshit, but that part seemed pretty good.

            • My father was a marine ATC in Korea. He told me in no uncertain terms that he regretted signing up, and that I should never enlist. Much of his advice was bullshit, but that part seemed pretty good.

              My dad was trained by the NSA for the Air Force and although he was only enlisted, he impressed the right people and it opened doors for him; a net positive experience, presumably.

              He also told me unequivocally to never enlist.

              • My Father served as a Medic in Vietnam and only ever told us kids the funny stories regarding his time there. Then was outraged when my brother invited a Marine Recruiter over for dinner one night, still didn't bother giving voice to his misgivings. Myself and my brother both ended up enlisting, and came out of it pretty well with no combat time. We only learned after the fact that he was terrified the whole time that we'd end up dead on foreign soil fighting for some commercial interest.

                My Dad has never be

      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        I doubt games alone could alter most people's behaviour significantly, but along with other things...

        Have a look at some of "The Golden One's" videos on YouTube. While games are only a small part of his journey, along with fantasy novels and bodybuilding, it's hard to ignore the fact that he fantasises about murdering people he dislikes, enacts those fantasies in the game world (see his Skyrim videos), then goes out into the real world to pose like the characters in the games and books, and finally ends up

      • by Reziac ( 43301 ) *

        Further, tho I'd probably find being required to play GTA at least somewhat relaxing.... if I had to play the Sims every day, by the end of the first week I'd have committed a violent act upon the testers.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It's not only that, it's testing a claim no one is making.

      The question that we need to ask ourselves is if violent video game playing by young children and young adults affects their development. And there's a lot of signs that it does: that it desensitizes them to violence, that it makes them more willing to hurt and kill.

      And, as you point out, there's also the open question of how violent video games affect people with mental illnesses.

      This study is meaningless. It answers a question no one asked. With th

      • With the explosion of school shootings, we should be asking ourselves "what's changed?" and one of the obvious answers is the increasing violence and realism of video games.

        I think you mean: with the DECLINE in school shootings [npr.org], we should be asking ourselves "what's changed"? and one of the obvious answers is that video games give kids, and especially troubled kids, an alternative outlet.

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          The nature of school shootings has changed. Used to be more disputes between individuals ending with someone getting shot, now there are more mass murders by people with severe mental illnesses.

      • With the explosion of school shootings, we should be asking ourselves "what's changed?" and one of the obvious answers is the increasing violence and realism of video games.

        ShanghaiBill does an excellent job of debunking the idea that school shootings are on the rise, but, even if we were to pretend that they are actually on the rise in the USA, your conclusion is retarded. Violent and realistic FPS games don't magically stay confined within your borders. People all over the world play them. Unless you're claiming that school shootings are on the rise around the globe it's idiotic to conclude that games are the reason.

      • by Sigma 7 ( 266129 )

        And there's a lot of signs that it does: that it desensitizes them to violence, that it makes them more willing to hurt and kill.

        Pretty sure there's a video game called "Real Life" that does even more desensitization, especially in sections where children get forced into violent situations, and getting punished for it. If only said game received the same type of regulations that conventional video games receive.

        With the explosion of school shootings, we should be asking ourselves "what's changed?" and one o

      • there's a lot of signs that it does: that it desensitizes them to violence

        Actually no there is no evidence of such a thing. Please cite your evidence. My evidence is that in spite of having so many violent video game over 20 years, violence among young adult and kid either reduced or stayed stable. e.g. https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/... [statcan.gc.ca] in this case totasl youth crime in canada sink quicker than general crime https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/... [statcan.gc.ca] if violent video game had any impact, you would expect a rise

      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        The other interesting question that is being largely overlooked is if gamer culture is being used as a gateway to extremism.

        If you look at a Venn diagram of hardcore gamers, incels, red-pillers and the like there seems to be some overlap. Leaked emails from Brietbart show that Milo Yianoppolis was groomed for that role, before he self-destructed.

        There has been some study of it, e.g. the book Kill All Normies.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I'm not concerned with video games changing peoples' behavior, turning normal people into psychopaths.

      Good. So, you're only worried about that 1% of the population that are psychopaths.

      What I would like to see studied, is the potential for video games to make psychopathic and sociopathic people more efficient in their anti-social abilities.

      You mean becoming CEOs of corporations?

      For example, I don't think playing ultra-realistic first person shooters will necessarily make anyone want to go out and shoot som

      • Good. So, you're only worried about that 1% of the population that are psychopaths.

        That's a strawman argument as well as a false dichotomy. I said no such thing.

        But you illustrate in your misdirected reply, the problem with these studies, as others have pointed out. They provide an answer to a question, a premise that virtually nobody buys into -- an extreme position that suggests merely playing a FPS can turn somebody into a psychopath. I don't know anybody making such claims. Nobody thinks playing GT

        • I find it amusing that, for example, it's considered inappropriate to say "fuck" on tv or show someone genitals -- because presumably that might influence certain types of people in an anti-social way, but you can shoot someone in the head and spew a catchy one-liner and it's no big deal?

          Psychologists have been saying that it won't hurt a child to see genitals on television for a long time, but people write angry letters if they see dongs and they don't write angry letters when they see guns.

          • by Sloppy ( 14984 )

            They should have done a study where one group was required to write angry letters about silly stuff, and the other group went on to live their lives. Then see which group acts crazier after that.

        • by Kjella ( 173770 )

          The real deeper issue is, do these ultra-realistic games de-sensitize people to inhumane and immoral behavior?

          In a good way or a bad way? I mean obviously seeing the goatse guy for the second time doesn't have nearly the same shock value. Spend a week on 4chan and you'll never be fazed by anything on the Internet ever again. Either that or you'll have ripped your eyeballs out of their sockets. But I don't think a paramedic is nonchalant about causing trauma, gore and death even though they've probably seen more than their fair share of it, in fact I think it's quite the opposite. I'm totally desensitized to shootin

        • There is no therapy for the antisocial personality disorder.

        • The real deeper issue is

          Says you. Why? What are you seeing that makes you look at video games for an explanation?

          ultra-realistic games

          The point of a game is that it's not realistic. People play games to explore a different rule set. Knowing that it's a game will see people exhibit behaviour that they wouldn't outside the game. You imply but don't argue or support a contention that as realism increases so does the impact or influence of the game. I'm not aware of any research or study that supports this although it's been a while since I went looking.

    • by e3m4n ( 947977 )

      remember when the Cell phone companies cited research after research that proved that texting while driving was no less dangerous than listening to the radio?

      Why dont they do the same research on 300 15yr-olds playing for 5hrs per day? How many people play call of duty for just 30min a day? My martial arts instructor was telling me, just two weeks after that 'swatting' incident that resulted in death, his own 26yr old son (we wont go into why he lives at home but its not entirely uncommon) getting into an o

      • by fazig ( 2909523 )
        I beg to differ on the "would never say face-to-face to someone". It may be a pseudo-anonymous thing in the following example as well, but it that doesn't stop it from going as far as a face-to-face situation. Just think about actual, physical violence among sports fans of opposing teams.
        Here I can talk from personal experience since I've attended soccer matches in the past and was greeted by some more radical fans of opposing teams and their flying cobblestones as we made our way to the train station. For
    • but it seems to me, if you're a psychopath and you're into those games, they can train you to be a much more efficient psychopath when it comes time to assaulting a school or public place

      The closest 99% of them will get to the weapons they've "trained" on is an AR15, and an untrained (by real live practice) civilian is going to be laughably bad with it. For example, the Dark Knight shooter illustrates the point. Out of like 80 rounds fired before being captured, he mostly wounded and only got like 15 fatali

    • and how gun culture pertains to it. But we've got laws against that [google.com] here in the States.
    • by clovis ( 4684 )

      I've seen numerous such studies since the 1980's back it was said the violent TV shows were making kids be violent.
      I don't know why anyone would spend money on looking at changes in adults for these kinds of things.

      The studies that I find are meaningful look for changes and differences between individual children rather than average changes for the groups as a whole.
      Correlation studies of groups of people for this topic are not interesting because it's the aberrant individuals that are the problem, and the

    • ..actual military training being available.

      you have a basically open for all applicants as a right military training that pays money. you could also go play airsoft or paintball.

      playing gta or call of duty has little effect on your skills to perform in said task in real life.

      americas army game even doesn't have that much effect, it's mostly about squad tactics.

      a much more sane response but not so popular would be to ban gyms - they would have a much higher effect as regards to training. maybe, just MAYBE yo

    • Suppose that there is a correlation. And? Ban video games because some potential killer might become 10 percent more effective? What if he goes to the gym? That would also make him better killer. Hey, the best strategy actually is to join the army. They train you to kill for free and even give you money! Hmm...dificult discussion this is.

    • I'm not concerned with video games changing peoples' behavior, turning normal people into psychopaths.

      Absolutely. I'm vastly more concerned about Donald Trump and Faux News turning normal human beings into violent psychopaths.

    • This would explain how mild-mannered losers who've never handled guns in their lives are able to turn into Neo and take out so many people so effectively (I don't tend to believe the usual witness reports of other active shooters at these scenes; I think the "mad skillz" explanations hold more water).
    • I'm not concerned with video games changing peoples' behavior, turning normal people into psychopaths.

      What I would like to see studied, is the potential for video games to make psychopathic and sociopathic people more efficient in their anti-social abilities.

      For example, I don't think playing ultra-realistic first person shooters will necessarily make anyone want to go out and shoot someone, but it seems to me, if you're a psychopath and you're into those games, they can train you to be a much more efficient psychopath when it comes time to assaulting a school or public place.

      There are "normal" brains and "psychopath" brains. A violent video game isn't going to turn a normal well-balanced individual into a psychopath. Quite the opposite, it's going to give them an outlet to get the aggression they might have out of their system in a safe, sanitary way. Now, if someone has a bit of an abnormal brain, not your average Joe on the street, but a potential future school-shooter, and they play a violent video game; rather than be a safe way of relieving aggression, might it cause th

  • Flawed study? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:08PM (#56281337)

    I'm not saying violent games lead to violent behavior, but their study seems kind of flawed in that the idea behind the claim is that violent games during childhood development desensitizes the child to violence, leading to them being more inclined to resort to using it down the road. That's nowhere near the same thing as claiming fully developed adults playing violent video games will start becoming violent themselves.

    • Re:Flawed study? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by fluffernutter ( 1411889 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:20PM (#56281381)
      I came here to post just this. They completely missed the whole 'developmental phase' aspect. It's hard to tell exactly what they were trying to prove with this actually. Perhaps how much money they could raise for a totally useless study.
      • If that were true, I think we'd have seen a massive increase in violent crime by now. Doom came out in the early 90's and by the early 00's we had games like GTA being sold in the millions. Crime rates have been declining all that while and if I had to make a guess part of that may be do to kids staying home and playing these violent video games instead of joining gangs and committing violent crimes in their neighborhoods.

        While it's not a substitute for an actual study to understand precisely what type o
  • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:12PM (#56281345) Journal

    When I played GTA V, it took a lot less than 2 months for me to start acting like my hero, Trevor Philips. I don't know what it was about that guy, but I found him a rather touching tragicomic character.

    The scene after he gives Patricia Madrazo back to her Mexican gangster husband after kidnapping her and he's driving away from the exchange and "If You Leave Me Now" by Chicago starts playing in the car had me laughing and crying at the same time. Except for the credits sequence in Saints Row IV, I don't think anything in a video game has ever affected me so profoundly.

    https://youtu.be/bPADGxsf8a8 [youtu.be]

  • 'No Significant Changes' in Their Behavior - apart from playing a computer game for at least 30 minutes a day all of a sudden. Errrm?
  • by FudRucker ( 866063 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:15PM (#56281361)
    i mostly ride the motocross bike around the mountains & desert for fun, i love bikes but damn near killed myself on one so i dont have a bike in the real world anymore so i pretend to ride on GTA5 i play it about an hour a day, sometimes a little more, sometimes less, plus i can be a bad boy and make the cops chase me around, its easy to lose em on the dirt bike in the mountains & desert, sometimes i get away sometimes i get killed, but its just a video game fantasy, its not real life, i know i could never get away with that in the real world, i would be dead or in prison
    • Nice sentence but not long enough for a Slashdot headline.

    • by e3m4n ( 947977 )

      well as a grown adult you have a better prefrontal cortex that is capable of predicting the consequences of your action. To claim that they have no effect on younger kids would be to undermine the entire ESRB rating system. There is a reason why these games have ratings. IMO the problems we see is that shitty parents ignore these ratings and let kids play games way outside their age group. Letting 12yo and 13yo play M+ games its not the same as letting adults play them. Unfortunately I have seen numbers as

  • This study found the truth because it looked at actual behavior instead of proxies for negative behavior.

    The problem with looking at proxies (besides their being no need to measure them when you can measure the real stuff) is that Video games are proxies for real life.

    So when you try to see if a proxy for violence results in the presence of proxies for violent behavior, surprise surprise. Fake sugar tastes sweet but does not have calories. That is why you use sugar substitutes. Same thing for video game

  • Everyone knows you can't teach an old dog new tricks.
  • I've honestly never played GTA anything.

    You want to know what makes me want to kill people using my car?

    Idiots in rush hour driving back and forth to work.

    I've seen so many road rage incidents around me that I just got to the point where I just leave a huge cushion of space between me and the person in front of me, waiting for them to do something totally stupid and unexpected, like 4 lane swerves, jamming their brakes on for no reason...

    Don't even get me started about when weather conditions become less th

    • by afxgrin ( 208686 )

      Thanks for providing that extra cushion space. I'll make sure to pass you so I can get one or two car lengths ahead to be stuck behind the person ahead of you. Eventually, if I cut off every single person I'll get home 15 seconds sooner while producing a massive wave of braking behind me. Please don't freak out too much though - I have a Baby On Board bumper sticker!

  • I mean, both games are about as equally violent. Have you ever played The Sims and turned the fridge backwards? Or let your Sims go swimming, then remove the ladder so they cannot escape? Or when the house catches fire, simply remove the front door? That game is violent as fuck y0!

  • by mentil ( 1748130 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @07:37PM (#56281433)

    Pointing the finger at violent video games/media is really shorthand for a broader concern: a culture which excuses or promotes violence. This culture is so pervasive in the USA (even outside of media) that a little extra exposure likely makes no significant difference, particularly since most violent games have little or nothing to say on the value of violence in society.

    I suspect a larger effect would be found if subjects were made to either listen to NRA Radio for 30 minutes every day for two months, or to listen to a comparable anti-violence media source (sorry can't think of a good one right now) the same amount. I'm not putting the blame solely on the NRA, it's just a good example of a steady drip of new info that can be consumed for 30 minutes each day; a gangsta rap Spotify playlist might have the same effect.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      True! When I visited the US it was more "normal" to carry a gun around town than to go to a movie that flashed an exposed boob.

      <flamebait>I wonder what it says about a society when it is more ok to own tools for killing than to acknowledge that sex is a very natural thing. But hypocrisy seem to be integrated with the culture.</flamebait>

    • by guruevi ( 827432 )

      Yet over the last few decades violence has decreased, not increased. The same arguments were used in the 80s about television and before that about radio and before that about books. The thing is, what sets of a psychopath is more about years of environmental issues that lead up to it (bad parenting, being a target for bullying, incompetent and insensitive school administrators) than what they used last week as entertainment.

      It's easy to point the finger and blame something you don't understand than taking

      • by mentil ( 1748130 )

        I was talking more about gang-bangers than mass shooters; no psychopathy is required. Insisting that psychopathy IS required, and normal psychology means someone is nonviolent, contributes to the problem. Indeed violence has gone down, but that's apparently a regression to the mean, with a prior outlier created by TEL pollution. Presumably, intelligence improved in the lowest percentiles, which I suspect led to increased resistance to the culture of violence. If the culture creates an impulse to commit viol

  • by Anonymous Coward

    This seemed like one of those studies that is paid by a corporate sponsor to come up with the desired results. First, adults are the wrong people to be testing. They have already established that the logic part of the brain doesn't fully develop until later in life. It should have been tested with teenagers. What anti-social teenager only plays for thirty minutes per day? It is more like 4 to 6 hours per day.

  • by neoRUR ( 674398 )

    This study is so good they did it twice..
    https://games.slashdot.org/sto... [slashdot.org]

  • Is the Sims 3 violent? Or was there a parallel study checking whether diamonds would start spontaneously appearing over people’s heads in the real world?

  • 1) Does being forced to play violent games make a random mature person violent? I don't think anyone was thinking it would, but this study suggests what most people believe.

    2) Do people who have an inclination toward violent behavior also tend to like these games in any useful indicator? Probably not, the sample size of video game players is so high compared to the actual violent offenders. While it may be the case that violent people like these games, there are so many more non-violent people who indulg

  • About half the friends I had growing up liked to play violent video games. The half that didn't play violent video games retained their empathy and never became violent. The half that played violent video games all became murderous psychopaths. The violent half never actually killed anyone, but it was only because they had great difficulty finding their victims after going blind from masturbating too much.
  • by argStyopa ( 232550 ) on Sunday March 18, 2018 @08:52PM (#56281653) Journal

    ...but it's hard to take this one seriously.

    Sample size of 90.
    Adults.
    Playing 30min/day for 2 months?

    Jesus, you could probably smoke CIGARETTES for 30min a day for 2 months and not see an impact.

    Or was this 'study' intended to disprove the videogame/behavior link?

  • 3 of 90 is over 3% of a very huge population of millions and millions and millions of gamers. It the study's anywhere near predictive, that's a lot of damage.

    I hate to say it because I spend a lot of time playing violent video games. And hey, no one's accusing me of very overly calm or patient. I'm certainly sexist, and I'm certainly not whatever interpersonally competent is.

    Do I get to blame the games?

    I've always wanted to be a member of the 1%. I suppose being a part of the 3% is pretty close.

  • That is nothing like the typical game playing of a teen. It also ignores that teens are far more impressionable than adults.
  • While I personally don't believe games cause such issues, 30 mins a day is hardly a valid test. Most of the people they claim are affected are those doing 8-12 hour sessions a day. If you are going to do a test at least do it right and actually include the right demographics and usage patterns.
  • Have you ever played The Sims 3? I'd expect that being forced to play that game daily would increase homicidal behavior substantially.

    I wouldn't make it two weeks.

  • by jd ( 1658 ) <imipak@@@yahoo...com> on Sunday March 18, 2018 @10:03PM (#56281843) Homepage Journal

    Let's say that there's a genetic contribution to the issue of game violence affecting people. Let's say 1 in 100 are affected. A study of 90 people has an excellent chance of only looking at those who wouldn't be affected.

    Let's say it takes 8 hours gaming a day - fairly typical for serious gamers. Half an hour will show nothing.

    No, you start by finding those who purport to be affected, then look to see what makes them abnormal, neurologically and genetically. You then create a hypothesis that some permutation of these factors is relevant.

    You then conduct a study to determine rarity, then a third study of sufficient size to guarantee a statistically significant number of interesting people are present.

    In this study, you measure traits, then assign each person a UUID. It has to be double blind. They don't know what you're measuring, the observer doesn't know who had what traits.

    Your hypothesis is that those who are vulnerable will show neurological changes as predicted. You do not rely on self-reporting other than to get the initial candidates, nor do you ever rely on psychology.

    This is how you tell who is affected, how and why.

    It's expensive, but you do this once and not once every few weeks. This strategy of producing the illusion of work actually costs more in the long run and answers nothing.

  • Another study made 25% of the subjects play King's Quest, 25% played Space Quest, another 25% played Police Quest and the last 25% played Leisure Suit Larry.

    Those who played King's Quest saw no change.
    Those who played Space Quest saw no change either.
    Those who played Police Quest also saw no change.
    Those who played Leisure Suit Larry haven't called back yet.

  • Well, it may not be violent games then. Perhaps it's casual games like Pokemon Go.

    Men reportedly attacked by man with tire iron over 'Pokemon Go' [katu.com].

  • kid shoots another kid, in the head, because... (wait for it...) they wouldn't share a video game controller: https://www.usatoday.com/story... [usatoday.com]

    I don't believe I've ever seen the claim that it changed adult behavior... you know, that's why we have a rating system that makes certain things unavailable to certain age groups (movies and games) so it seems kind of stupid that they only tested it on adults.

    Also, others have made the comment but I'll just agree here: 30 minutes a day doth not a gamer make.
  • "adults chosen, who ranged from 18 to 45 years old, reported little to no video game play in the previous six months and were screened for pre-existing psychological problems before the tests."

    So, only three (3) out of ninety (90) NON-GAMERS who were mentally strip-searched before entry had violent tendencies after playing games?

    No Shirt, Hemlock!
    (bowdlerized for your viewing comfort/sanitized for your protection)

    Better still, even after being "subjected to a wide battery of 52 established questionnaires in

  • Would you call a person who walked for 30 minutes a day addicted to walking? Nope. Gym rats who spend hours in the gym every day are addicted. Not being able to forego a workout while on vacation is indicative of an addiction. This study doesn't look deep enough. Furthermore, they questions they should be asking is whether or not players of violent video games have altered their value of human life.

  • See, the problem with large numbers is... they're large.

    Only 3% showed any change? Great. One snag: there are 50 million students in the U.S. 3% of them = 1.5 million.

    https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/... [ed.gov]

    (To say nothing of the other flaws in the study that others here have pointed out.)

  • Notice they said "adult". Not children, whose brains and personalities are still developing. I would exercise caution before assuming that video games have no negative effect on childrens behaviour. There is a lot of evidence that it does. For instance, there have been cases where stabbings had occurred over a fight over a video game among children.

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