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Puzzle Games (Games) Operating Systems Software Windows

Why Windows Solitaire Eats So Much Time 261

Posted by timothy
from the chomp-chomp dept.
An anonymous reader writes "This article suggests that Windows Solitaire may be the most-often played computer game. It's not so much an article about Solitaire, but rather an article about Windows and human nature and socialization. If you play FreeCell, there's a interesting paragraph about its inventor." Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?
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Why Windows Solitaire Eats So Much Time

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  • "Read more" (Score:5, Funny)

    by thetorpedodog (750359) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:07PM (#23457362) Homepage

    Read more from Slate's special issue on procrastination.

    Actually, I think I'll wait until tomorrow...when I have work to do.

    • People who use computers at home do something better with them than Solitare but it is still some kind of common lowest denominator.

      Solitare is "popular" because it's on every corporate desktop at every big dumb company where people are better at looking busy than they are at getting work done ... when they have any to do. Everyone also knows that the really fun things you can do with a computer will get you fired. For some reason, people big dumb company types let anti-social wastes of time slide but an

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by KGIII (973947)
        Full disclosure: I am a Microsoft MVP and have been on campus and this information is not from anyone there but rather from a conversation in a bar in Seatle as I recall. My memory is a tad bit fuzzy. I blame beer.

        However... I came away with the impression that Windows "still included" the games (this was XP release era) because of the reason that it has always included the games. The games were there as a test for graphics and the ability to create random numbers. I am unable to find anything online to a
        • by cp.tar (871488) <cp.tar.bz2@gmail.com> on Monday May 19, 2008 @03:48AM (#23459478) Journal

          I don't know why Windows still includes games, but I do know what Solitaire is awfully good for: education.
          All the computer-illiterate people I've taught found Solitaire an invaluable aid in learning how to use the mouse.

          While to us geeks, the mouse is a natural extenstion of the hand, computer newbies have a really hard time with it; instead of looking at the screen, they look at the mouse, and left and right click are higher math. With Solitaire, they get something unimportant, yet interesting to look and click at; the game absorbs them and they forget about the mouse in the hand. Minesweeper is also great, but for advanced newbies -- after they've learned the basics of mouse usage, they can achieve precision playing Minesweeper.

          For that reason, I use similar games under Linux as well when introducing newbies to the computer. First learn how to use the keyboard and the mouse, then we can get on with some real work. I found there was no use in teaching people advanced concepts when they still lose their way on the input devices.
          Kind of like teaching aphasiacs the finer points in grammar.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by Fred_A (10934)

            I don't know why Windows still includes games, but I do know what Solitaire is awfully good for: education.

            All the computer-illiterate people I've taught found Solitaire an invaluable aid in learning how to use the mouse.
            When discussing the bundled games with the IBM OS/2 people (back when), the consensus was indeed that the purpose of those little games was to teach mouse usage. I too have found through the years that they work pretty well in this regard.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by flowsnake (1051494)
      Further timewasting opportunities for tomorrow include reading an interview with Wes Cherry, the guy who wrote Windows Solitaire: interview [b3ta.com]

      It seems that Wes would himself prefer Robotron 2084 to Solitaire.

  • Can It? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Vectronic (1221470) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:08PM (#23457378)
    "Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?"

    On a Per-Person level, I think there are more people that have spent 20 hours in a day playing Tetris, than Windows Solitaire.

    But, I think more people play Solitaire than play(ed) Tetris, so collectively its more hours.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      I hate you! Now I will remember the songs again, is gonna be a long long week, unless i can find my gameboy
    • Re:Can It? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by kesuki (321456) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:49PM (#23457634) Journal

      "Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?"

      On a Per-Person level, I think there are more people that have spent 20 hours in a day playing Tetris, than Windows Solitaire.

      But, I think more people play Solitaire than play(ed) Tetris, so collectively its more hours.
      I think you missed the tag line from TFA "Chen, the company's usability research crew discovered that the three most-played computer games solitaire or something else, Microsoft or otherwise, preloaded or user-installed) are, in order Spider Solitaire, Klondike Solitaire, and Free Cell."

      now personally, i have over 13,000 games of WC3TFT, which translates to roughly 135.416*(infinitely repeating 6s) days of warcraft 3... and i know free cell is probably not even the second game, for my list, that right belongs to the first (us release) of Advance wars, with well over 1000 hours (over 41 days straight) free cell isn't even my third favorite game, I've probably only done 500 hands of it in total, but i am an atypical player.

      It makes me wonder, how exactly did Microsoft figure out which programs are used the most? does windows XP and later 'phone home' the top 10 most launched applications? if it does that, that number can be skewed, if the Microsoft coded apps are going by 'games played' using built in statistics, then how can they compare to ordinary video games that don't provide these statistics to Microsoft? after all, i would only launch wc3 once a day, and get in as many as 50 games a day... but if the statistics are of launching the application, I've known some people who 'think' they get better game hands by exiting and restarting free cell than by normal means of getting a new game...

      seriously How is Microsoft getting their numbers?!?

      * = based on an average game length of 15 minutes, but my average game length might be longer, i can't recall and the statistics are only for one season, not the whole time I've been a warcraft player.
      • "...does windows XP and later 'phone home'..."

        I Dont think XP does, or it would have shown up on my firewall somewhere (although I rarely play them, maybe it tries to phone home after X amount of hours played or something)

        Vista, I really wouldnt doubt that it does, considering its already got other internet-connected stuff in its "Games"...thingymajiggy (has a centralized Control panel for the the default games, aswell as most you install afterwards)

        But I havent used Vista much, so I dont know personally if
      • Re:Can It? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by slyn (1111419) <ozzietheowl@gmail.com> on Sunday May 18, 2008 @11:11PM (#23458124)
        You figuring that out makes me think of Xfire, which tracks the amount of time played by people who have the Xfire client installed.

        Some quick calculations [google.com] using stats from the xfire [xfire.com] site show that on today, a non-holiday sunday, approximately 44 man-years of time have been played only in the game World of Warcraft. Not to mention that leaves out all Mac WoW'ers (we do exist), and ever so rare wine linux WoW'ers. And even on top of that, all the people who did play on windows today but don't have the Xfire client installed.
      • Re:Can It? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by kitgerrits (1034262) * on Monday May 19, 2008 @01:10AM (#23458820)

        seriously How is Microsoft getting their numbers?!?
        The few millions of gamers across the globe con't compare to the hundreds of millions of professionals that have some spare time to kill at the office.
        THAT is how Solitaire gets played.

        Also, I recall the games were added to promote hand-eye co-ordination because, back when they were written, a mouse was a novel thing to have on a computer.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Kankraka (936176)
        Actually you CAN get better game hands by exiting and restarting freecell. You don't -have- to open and close it, you can just hit F2 or select new game. If you look in the title bar it will say FreeCell Game #(1-100000). It only has 1000000 possible games, so if they restart FreeCell it changes to one of those hands, some being easier than others. Alternatively they could just write down one of their favorite hands and press F3 to enter said hand number. Oh, I've played FreeCell maybe.. three times in my
    • Re:Can It? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mrbluze (1034940) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @10:20PM (#23457858) Journal

      But, I think more people play Solitaire than play(ed) Tetris, so collectively its more hours.
      That's ONLY because Windows doesn't come default with Tetris.
    • "Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?" On a Per-Person level, I think there are more people that have spent 20 hours in a day playing Tetris, than Windows Solitaire. But, I think more people play Solitaire than play(ed) Tetris, so collectively its more hours.

      Alternatively, we can blame Microsoft's monopoly for this one --- after all, Tetris isn't bundled, so it won't get played as much... ;)

      I think it adds up in more ways than one, though. I spent a few weeks playing Tetris obsessively during my early teens. On the other hand, I can't even count the amount of time I've spent playing a "quick game" of Solitaire here and there in the two decades since that time.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        Tetris is a much more "in your face" game IMHO.

        Most of the designers have a copy of bomberman for when we play out of hours network games while I rebuild servers, and Tetris and online poker and any number of games, yet time and again they play Solitaire (or MineSweeper). Why? Because you can swap out your window and it doesn't really matter - with Tetris generally the game doesn't pause (perception might not reflect reality), and requires a lot more concentration as you get into the higher levels.

        And let
        • Similar story for me and Solitaire.. when installing stuff on a really slow machine, or the other day when I was waiting for some pictures to render on a not-quite-so-slow machine, I was playing Sol.. kind of embarrassed to be contributing to this statistic, it's a bit depressing.
    • by eonlabs (921625)
      Here's a question... do you count playing tetris clones as playing tetris? What would constitute a solitaire clone?

      I've spent several times the amount of time I played solitaire playing the original dos netris.

      bombs, big bombs, lasers, mashers, and inverters. What a great freaking game!
  • Screw Card Games! (Score:4, Interesting)

    by morari (1080535) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:09PM (#23457384) Journal
    There's too much luck involved and not enough skill. I'll play Pinball over Solitaire any day. Now if only Microsoft would include a good Chess game...

    Seriously though, I have Quake, SimCity2000, and Diablo on any computer that I use just in case I do get bored. Those titles will run on pretty much anything.

    • by Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:16PM (#23457424)
      I guess the key difference is that Solitaire and Pinball are usually found preinstalled on most systems. I find that when I'm preparing workstations I tend to leave them on there. When I walk by and see somebody playing solitaire it doesn't bother me, if I saw somebody playing the Sims or some fps there would be a problem.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      For all the vista bitching, it does have a fairly nice chess game :)

    • Then you, sir, have never actually played the more obscure variants which have addressed this problem. The Victorians mastered the art, and created a whole spectrum from pure luck to 100% solvable.

      Windows has included the now famous Klondike variant. However, if you're a skill maven, look up the Spider family of variants which were always my favorites. I think I even saw a Windows port somewhere too. (If not, it's a snap to program them.)

    • Re:Screw Card Games! (Score:5, Informative)

      by DavidD_CA (750156) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:54PM (#23457666) Homepage
      Windows Vista (some versions) now comes with a quite decent Chess game.

      -David
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by STrinity (723872)

      Now if only Microsoft would include a good Chess game...
      Upgrade to Vista.
      • by Weaselmancer (533834) on Monday May 19, 2008 @12:11AM (#23458496)

        Just grab GNU chess Windows port. [tim-mann.org]

        Funny story about GNU chess.

        Back when I was in college I had two friends that were sharing an apartment. One worked in the day, the other at night. Their only communication was a chessboard on top of the TV. Each person would take a move before going to bed.

        One friend cheated. He compiled GNU chess on his Linux box, inputted the board, cranked it up to nearly maximum, and left it to calculate the next move. It would take about 10 hours or so to calculate its next move.

        He'd come home from work, make a sandwich, login and get his move, and go to bed. Needless to say he was kicking much ass, and his friend was mightily puzzled at his ability to do so.

        He finally came clean though - it was a pretty funny scene when he did. =)

    • There's too much luck involved and not enough skill.
      In some there is a lot of luck but in freecell all the cards positions are known at the start of the game and almost every game is solvable.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Freecell games are built from complete decks by suit into the stacks that you start with. What that means is that every game is solvable because it started in a solved state and was deconstructed into the puzzle.
        • Re:Screw Card Games! (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Imsdal (930595) on Monday May 19, 2008 @06:57AM (#23460476)
          This is completely false. There are 32K different "semirandom" games, and one of them is not solvable. And they are of course not "deconstructed". How would you "deconstruct" a Freecell game?
          The unsolvable game is #11,982. (And yes, I know that it hasn't formally been proved to be unsolvable, but there are a zillion solvers out there and all of them has failed, so for all practical purposes it is unsolvable.)
    • by DeadChobi (740395)
      There's a lot of skill required to do well in Solitare. I thought the same as you until I noticed the subtleties introduced by having a spin-up and spin-down version of each color. When you gather your aces and are trying to collect more cards, swapping spin orientation on cards can net you a considerable cavalcade of cascading colored cards. Sometimes you can even advance a game by removing cards from your ace stack and putting them back into play so that you can retrieve more cards from your deck. This al
  • ... and could only have one thing, it would be a deck of cards. I would start to play solitaire and eventually somebody inevitably would come along to tell me to place that red eight on the black nine and I'd be rescued.
  • Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?
    What, are you on drugs [pineight.com] or something? ;-)
  • Perfect steps... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BoldAC (735721) * on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:10PM (#23457400)

    People waste time because they don't know how to cheat! Here are the vista Solitaire [tech-recipes.com] and XP Solitaire [tech-recipes.com] cheats.

    Honestly, solitaire has the perfect assets to be the most popular computer game.

    1. Anybody can figure it out. My children picked it up in 5 minutes.
    2. It's available on to a huge population. Everybody with a windows box has it installed and staring them in the face. Any system is powerful enough to run it.
    3. It fills downtime while other processes are loading. Need a few minutes to download that huge iso? Heck, you can probably get in a game of solitaire!

    Interestingly enough, solitaire is probably the most popular card game as well... for similar reasons.

    "It is the cockroach of gaming, remarkably flexible and adaptable..."
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Darkness404 (1287218)

      2. It's available on to a huge population. Everybody with a windows box has it installed and staring them in the face. Any system is powerful enough to run it.


      And to sorta nitpick, most Linux distros include some version of solitaire too. Its even on Emacs! http://stuff.mit.edu/afs/athena/contrib/games/elisp/solitaire.el [mit.edu]
      • Woops, should have actually read most of the code.... The Emacs version isn't like Windows Solitaire, it is the peg variant, it has nothing to do with cards.
      • The tetromino game is on a lot more machines than some people might think: Open GNU Emacs. Press M-x (Emacs-ese for Alt+x) to open Emacs' command prompt. Type tetris and press Enter [google.com].
      • Re:Perfect steps... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by kesuki (321456) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:56PM (#23457684) Journal
        Linux solitaire(AisleRiot) has everything from Agnes to Zebra! not 'just' spider, Klondike, and free cell... which windows implements through three separate executables?!? for simple card games?!? you need 3 game engines to play cards?!?! crazy man crazy...
        • by YrWrstNtmr (564987) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @10:10PM (#23457806)
          Linux solitaire(AisleRiot) has everything from Agnes to Zebra! not 'just' spider, Klondike, and free cell... which windows implements through three separate executables?!? for simple card games?!? you need 3 game engines to play cards?!?! crazy man crazy...

          And the inverse to that is:
          Several small, individual, standalone files that do one thing each and do it well, vs one bloated monolithic pile o crap that tries to do everything.
          • by kesuki (321456) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @11:26PM (#23458226) Journal
            AisleRiot is a single program '/usr/games/sol' and even though it has so many games '/usr/games/sol' is just 151,904 bytes.

            In comparison, on Windows 'sol.exe' is 56,832 bytes, freecell 55,296 bytes, and Spider (AsileRiot has 3 versions of spider, btw) is a whopping 538,624 bytes, but you know the fireworks at the end are clearly worth it, right?

            AisleRiot For what it's worth, in it's 151,904 bytes of glory has exactly 82 version of solitare. many with multiple rule settings...is only 25% of the file size of 'windows top three games' (as per TFA) even though it supports a whopping 79 'extra' games that windows users don't have.... just imagine, if the card engine were expanded to the same file size of those three executables by adding perhaps, a generic computer multiplay game engine the likes of 'hearts' and ' internet spades' that XP has... then you might have over 200 games in one 600 k executable...

        • by Johnno74 (252399)
          They actually share a common graphics library - cards.dll (well pre-XP versions did, at least...)
          I wrote a little card game for my wife based on an unusual version of solitare she plays, and a little research on the web lead me to the API for cards.dll which made the project a doddle.
        • by kesuki (321456)
          It doesn't look like AisleRiot has an easy way to install on win 32, but when i googled it this interesting message from the gnome mailing list came up http://mail.gnome.org/archives/games-list/2007-June/msg00009.html [gnome.org]

          but installing 2 large ported windows apps to get a small, basic '82 game' version of solitaire on windows is almost as much work, as just switching to Linux...

    • Funny, I always thought that the reason so many people played solitaire was because it's the only game that doesn't crash in Windows.
  • Can Solitaire really eat up more hours than have been sacrificed to Tetris?
    Given that Tetris isn't installed on every Windows desktop...do you even have to ask?
  • by Eastree (719351) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:23PM (#23457462) Homepage
    I don't have any proof, but I'll still tell:

    A few years ago I was cleaning out the records room where I worked. Among all the old manuals of long dead software, I found a four floppy install set of Windows 3.1 (or 3.1.1? It was a very long time ago). On its list of features was Solitaire, listed as mouse practice software of all things. Needless to say, a joke quickly circulated in the office, that we weren't playing games; we were training for better hand-eye coordination with a computer mouse.

    That aside, if anyone has an old copy, or knows of an image online, I would very much appreciate the correlation of ecidence.
    • by Larry Lightbulb (781175) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:57PM (#23457694)
      Wasn't Solitaire supposed to be showing people how to drag 'n' drop, and Minefield was to show them how to left and right click?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by allanw (842185)

      That aside, if anyone has an old copy, or knows of an image online, I would very much appreciate the correlation of ecidence.
      If you had read the FA, you would have seen this exact same point made there ;)
    • by WMD_88 (843388)
      Windows 3.0 was on four floppies. I used my copy on a second-hand 386 laptop a few years ago; Tetris was there and played fine...and took up the entire 640x480 screen. :) However, I'm not quite sure where my disks are right now (nor do I have the means to transfer them to my modern computers). There's bound to be torrents of it or something somewhere.
  • It is an addiction (Score:5, Interesting)

    by CliffEmAll (794568) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:26PM (#23457482) Homepage
    I loathe Freecell. I also play an average of 3 or 4 games of it a day. I don't think I get any satisfaction from the act of playing or from winning, but it has become the primary opportunity to shut off my brain for a moment or two between tasks. I cannot count the number of times I have opened the game, then closed it because I could find no motivation to play, then re-opened it and played a game 15 minutes later. In the meantime, I could be reading /. or wikipedia or playing a real game, but none of these other diversions quite fill the short-term, no thought required niche that the hated Solitaire game does. There is something seriously wrong with me ...
    • by mauthbaux (652274) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @11:59PM (#23458416) Homepage
      When I was in school, i had to totally remove freecell from my computer. It got to the point where it was impacting my GPA. Yes. Seriously.

      I'd sit down to write a paper and get in a sentence or two. Just as soon as I didn't immediately know what to type in next, I'd open freecell and start a game. 2 hours later, I might have only written a few more words. It was bad enough that starting up the program became instinctive (thank you windows "most recent programs used" list). I distinctively remember catching myself on several occasions where I didn't remember starting up the game; much less what I was supposed to be doing instead. Of course, once you had started a game, you had to finish it. Heaven forbid you quit the game half way through and damage your winning streak.

      7 months without the game, and I more or less lost interest in freecell. Instead, I've ended up playing a lot of Go [smart-games.com]. (no, I'm no afiliated or pushing an agenda here; just merely admitting to my most recent game addiction.) As of yet, it's not as bad as solitaire or freecell.

      Honestly tho, I think I just feel like I need to be addicted to *something*. It would probably be World of Warcraft if that one would load up a little faster.
  • by CurtMonash (986884) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:27PM (#23457490) Homepage
    One virtue of solitaire over most other computer games is that it's not time-based. You can play for exactly as long as you want to. You don't need to finish a level in the time allotted, kill the aliens before they land, play a word before your opponent gets annoyed with you, or anything like that. You have complete control of the gaming schedule.

    One can have similar experiences from playing board games vs. computer opponents, or from the crafting aspect of MMOs. But solitaire is by far the simplest way of achieving them.

    • by tepples (727027) <tepples@nOSpAM.gmail.com> on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:50PM (#23457638) Homepage Journal

      One virtue of solitaire over most other computer games is that it's not time-based.
      Neither is Tetris. You can just sit and spin a piece forever [ytmnd.com]. In fact, this infinite spin behavior [tetrisconcept.com] has been mandatory in Tetris(tm) products [tetrisconcept.com] since the early 2000s.
      • I don't think microsoft tetris for windows has that behaviour though.

        In any case the game still controls the schedule. If you don't keep spinning that peice (or pause but that tends to require moving your fingers away from the main controls limiting when you can safely do it) it will drop.
        • by tepples (727027)

          If you don't keep spinning that peice (or pause but that tends to require moving your fingers away from the main controls limiting when you can safely do it) it will drop.
          The lock delay in most recent Tetris games is half a second. That's more than long enough to press Rotate Right with one hand and Pause with the other.
    • That's one thing that always made me wonder: to what length other games go to not let you just freaking (save and) quit when you want to.

      E.g., the biggest madness in console gaming that I've personally experienced was a game where I didn't find a save point for 10 hours straight. Luckily it was on a Sunday, but I can tell you that by the end of it I had almost lost even the will to live, not just to play that stupid game any more.

      Other games prey on people's social instincts, and essentially create situatio
  • by Proudrooster (580120) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:30PM (#23457504) Homepage
    It was often said in days of yore that Windows was the best $80 Solitaire game one could buy. However, I believe that Sid Meir games such as Civilization dwarf Solitaire have consumed far more time. Civilization IV is epic and can take days to finish a single game.

    I won't even touch the MMORPG's like Evercrack and WOW.

    Can anyone get me a pre-release demo of StarCraft II ? That is the one I really want to waste a lot of time on.
    • You should try Company of Heroes if you liked Starcraft
      • Exactly!
        I Love Company of Heroes and Opposing Fronts.
        Especially with the Authentic Weapons Mod.
        After 6 months of nastly playing, i can now beat the Computer at Normal Computer setting easily.
        8600 GT and AMD X2 are a deadly combination.
  • by wbren (682133) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @09:33PM (#23457532) Homepage

    If you play FreeCell, there's a interesting paragraph about its inventor.
    Inaccurate! The interesting paragraph about the inventor of FreeCell is present in my copy of the article, despite the fact that I do not play FreeCell. /badjoke
  • Do you think GWB has admin rights on his PC? As a system administrator, would you have the guts to remove sol.exe? If you did, would it be a unilateral decision?

    Just imagine, sol.exe could be the only thing to stop GWB from getting bored enough to push the Big Red Button.
  • Windows Solitaire was for mouse training at first so people are still sticking to that. It is a easy to play time waster.
  • How did Solitaire work in a Casino? There is mode in the windows one for it Does it play like the Casino way did? and are there Casinos that still have it?
  • by TheNetAvenger (624455) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @10:03PM (#23457748)
    Solitaire is a good thing.

    Although it probably seems foreign to most of us here, mouse hand-eye coordination is not automatic.

    And for new users or even new users at a business, our IT people encourage people to start with something like solitaire and just let people goof off until it becomes automatic. (Notice the stores or businesses that have mouse driven software and the users take FOREVER to move the cursor on screen to make selections. Giving them a week of play time on something like Soitaire would increase their productivity in the long run, and reduce customer frustration. (Not that I recommend a Mouse UI for checkstands or small business invoicing, but there is a lot of crap software out there in specific industries that rely on it.

    It is also a good tool for users moving to touch pads, pens, thumbsticks, etc as it is simple, mindless and yet lets people master the abstract motor neural control of input devices.

    Everytime we have a proficient tech that 'hates' an input device, our policies are to make them use that input device, at least for stuff like solitaire if not general work until it becomes second nature. Especially if the tech is ever going to be using it in public or assisting corporate clients where the device might be widely used. (Touchpads and Thumbsticks being #1 on this list.)

     
  • by zappepcs (820751) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @10:29PM (#23457912) Journal
    MS Solitaire eats up so much time because they did not ship a decent version of Maijong.... meh
  • by ChrisCampbell47 (181542) on Sunday May 18, 2008 @10:45PM (#23457998)
    I'm not kidding. Well, I was finishing my engineering degree, and had a frisky girlfriend, so it didn't consume all my time, but I swear every remaining waking moment was spent playing it. On my tricked out zero-wait-state 12 MHz 286. And it was the original Russian DOS-mode game, none of this crappy flash knockoff shite. I will bury you.
  • Hmm (Score:2, Funny)

    by pedrop357 (681672)
    I'm playing a game right now, so I'm really getting a kick out of these repli...Err umm... sorry, wrong site.

    In Soviet Russia, games play YOU!

    That's better.
  • it's a progression (Score:2, Interesting)

    by rubah (1197475)
    My parents started with solitare, the classic. After they played a few thousand games apiece of that, they moved on to freecell. They got that mastered too, and graduated to hearts. They're still playing hearts, and my dad even taught the game to my grandpa, uncle, and family friend who meet every second sunday night, originally to play dominos, but now domino night has become hearts night if not in name, then definitely in substance.

    (going to domino night was a special treat while growing up because I c
  • by ChameleonDave (1041178) * on Monday May 19, 2008 @12:52AM (#23458706) Homepage

    The really significant thing about the Windows Solitaire program is that it has probably permanently changed the name of the card game Patience to "Solitaire".

  • For what more your just bought computer with just windows preloaded can be used on?

    IF you get a computer (since '96) it probably will have some version of windows preinstalled, and a very few applications, and of those, the one that can be used by everyone and in any moment is solitaire.

    What else is there? Minesweeper? You have to THINK? If you use to do that, then why you got windows in the 1st place?

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