Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Games

Game Development In the Heart of Africa 72

Posted by kdawson
from the feed-'em-up dept.
Peace Corps Online writes "The Internet has been credited with 'flattening' the world economy, giving anyone anywhere with the requisite skills the opportunity to build a game or create an app on Facebook. Now the Mercury News reports on a new game for the iPhone called iWarrior. It was produced by two 26-year-old developers in Africa, Eyram Tawiah (a Ghanaian) and Wesley Kirinya (a Kenyan), who created every element of their game — the mechanics, the graphics, the music — overcoming considerable obstacles to develop their first product. The game is 'a feed 'em up game, not a shoot 'em up,' says Tawiah, where you 'defend your village by feeding and driving away the animals before they crash it and feed on your livestock and garden!' with threats including thundering elephants, mighty rhinos, swift cheetahs, and crafty hyenas. The developers' company, Leti, which means 'star' in the Ewe language, was nurtured by the philanthropic arm of San Francisco-based Meltwater Group, an Internet business services company, which in 2008 founded the Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology in Accra, Ghana. 'We believe talent is everywhere,' says the Meltwater founder and CEO."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Game Development In the Heart of Africa

Comments Filter:
  • by crossmr (957846) on Sunday April 04, 2010 @05:35AM (#31722774) Journal

    Maybe a group of Nigerian programmers could finally finish Duke Nukem Forever . . . if they get a small fee in advance to cover some start up costs . . . ?

    I represent CEO John Mundabi. Our software firm was just taken over by rebels. We had were preparing the gold master of Duke Nukem Forever to be shipped only moments before half of our team was brutally slaughtered. The rebels are holding our building and assets hostage, however for a small fee of just $5000 (five thousand) US dollars, they've agreed to allow us access to some of the equipment for a short period of time. If we secure access to this disc we would be able to release it. We expect revenues in excess of $40,000,000 (forty million) and would be willing to offer you $2,000,000 (two million) for your help. I think the color of one's skin and the distance do not matter, we can all help one another.
    with god
    Celia Rundabar

The universe is all a spin-off of the Big Bang.

Working...