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Dragon Age 2 Announced 183

Posted by Soulskill
from the enchantment?-enchantment! dept.
Today BioWare announced a sequel to Dragon Age: Origins, titled Dragon Age 2. They've opened an official site for the game, which shares some vague details and concept art, and promises a trailer in mid-August. The story will apparently span an entire decade and involve a new hero, but it will be located in the same world as the original game. The site says there will be "dynamic new combat mechanics," though the same three basic classes will be available. More information should be forthcoming in this month's issue of Game Informer.
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Dragon Age 2 Announced

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  • by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @12:49PM (#32841690) Homepage

    I sunk 70+ hours into my first game (female Dwarf Noble) did as many side missions as I could find) and put about 40+ hours into my second game (female City Elf). Dragon Age's world really felt alive, and I felt like I was having a direct impact ont he way things were going.

    I don't usually like to gush on about a game, but even with its flaws (slightly wonky camera, some textures looked like they were from the N64 era while other textures looked very realistic, etc) Dragon Age deserves every bit of attention and praise it gets. Truly great storytelling, and truly engaging gameplay.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by EntropyXP (956792)
      I can't wait either. That game was truly epic. Too bad the expansion sucked so bad. I hope the sequel has a good story and is well told.
    • by Kjella (173770)

      I did the same, the only downside I could find was that in the expansion my character was ridiculously overpowered. I started on level 20 with a full deck of 100GP-class items and I didn't feel the level adjustment worked at all, even turning up the difficultly meter to max my character was a tank. I was kinda committed to that character though so just went with it anyway.

      Well, that and the AI was a bit stupid in that if I stuck to melee/ranged attacks he'd keep pounding my tanks, while if I tried to spell

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      I had an adverse reaction though I played it a bit differently. Like when I played the first Mass Effect, I didn't do any of the sidequests because I wanted to progress the main storyline as fast as possible.

      And that bothered me with Dragon-age, is that I couldn't seem to progress fast enough, no matter what class I chose. I eventually stopped playing - some time just before the landsmeet, after getting all the treaties fulfilled. The boss fights I encountered didn't require any strategy, just enough poltic

      • by flitty (981864)
        I've never heard of anyone trying to get through an RPG as quickly as possible and enjoying it. If you're just trying to "beat" it, you miss out on so much. (BTW, if you play Mass Effect 2, I'd argue that the main mission is not the point of the game. The side missions are the "main" game, and the Main story is just the structure for an ending.)

        If Bioware decides to make it multiplayer, this game would be a mMORPG (minorly-Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game). The reason why Dragon Age combat was co
        • I wasn't just trying to beat it, I was trying to progress the storyline. Just regular progression to the next plot element took too long.

          And Would you consider Fable 2 Multiplayer? It was essentially a hack and slash RPG where you COULD have a second player, but it was never necessary and didn't detract from the game.

      • Ugh, please no. (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Uniquitous (1037394)

        One thing that would have made it infinitely better was a multiplayer option, even just locally.

        Maybe I'm just a misanthrope, but enough with the goddamn multiplayer. That's what D&D is for.

    • I loved the setting, but I don't understand how some people were spending so long to beat the game. I did every side quest, and tried to get as many achievements as possible in my first play through, and I still beat the game in around 30 hours. I'm a notorious completist who takes his time.

      As much as I loved the setting, I wished the gameplay wasn't as simplistic or as short.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Drakensang was far superior.

      I can't wait till the english version of it's sequel comes out in august.

      • by Pojut (1027544)

        Drakensang was far superior.

        I don't agree that it was superior, but it was definitely an under-represented gem.

        I can't wait till the english version of it's sequel comes out in august.

        SERIOUSLY?????? daGHP:S(OEH G(P*ASE HTG(W* EHA I had no idea there even was a sequel! You just made my day :-)

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      I sunk 70+ hours into my first game (female Dwarf Noble) did as many side missions as I could find) and put about 40+ hours into my second game (female City Elf). Dragon Age's world really felt alive, and I felt like I was having a direct impact ont he way things were going.

      You've opened a can of worms, in case you've chosen different outcomes for the "big" events. You might have to play the second game twice with both your saves, in order to see what the differences are :P

    • Quite liked the first one but the 'dungeons' were ridiculous. I stopped wanting to go into rooms because I just knew there would be a fight there almost exactly like the last fight.

      If I wanted grind, I'd go back and get to level 200 on Dofus [youtube.com].

      The only fights worth doing in RPGs are epic fights.

    • by Draek (916851)

      Well, I *can* wait. Know why? because I'm still not finished with the original game. Spent over a hundred hours in my first playthrough (male Human Noble), I'm 10 hours into my second one (female City Elf) and now I've even got Awakening to look forward to after I finish the original campaign. And after that I'd like to try a mage ;)

      If it had a multiplayer option like NWN it'd be the perfect game, but yeah, even without it its worth every penny and then some.

  • by Tetsujin (103070) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @12:52PM (#32841734) Homepage Journal

    (L)ook for something to kill
    (H)ealer's Hut
    (R)eturn to town

  • by Kenja (541830) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:00PM (#32841834)
    Given how much the BioWare games are turning into Japanese "dating" sims. If you dont know who Illusion Games is, think of a gaming company focused 100% on realistic breast manipulation.
    • by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:04PM (#32841920) Homepage

      Given how much the BioWare games are turning into Japanese "dating" sims.

      I call bullshit. The relationship aspect of BioWare games is an entirely option part of the experience, and involves no more strategy than picking the "nice" sounding conversational lines.

      Hardly the same thing as a dating sim.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Luckyo (1726890)

        Given how much the BioWare games are turning into Japanese "dating" sims.

        I call bullshit. The relationship aspect of BioWare games is an entirely option part of the experience, and involves no more strategy than picking the "nice" sounding conversational lines.

        Hardly the same thing as a dating sim.

        Actually, you just summarized an average dating sim. Picking "nice sounding conversational lines" is generally the only gameplay element in those games.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Hatta (162192)

          That's a pretty poor simulation then. In real life, girls go for the jerks.

          • by Luckyo (1726890)

            "nice sounding conversation lines" was a quote from the parent. It's pretty obvious that sim makers can (and do) make anything from masochists to dominas and from normal girls to killer stalkers.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by medv4380 (1604309)
          That really depends on how you play in a real dating sim. Good ones have far more variety then just playing the nice sounding options. That's a good formula for an average ending with a good chance of a bad or null ending. Now if Dragon Age added about 10 times more character conversation trees and made them more time dependent then it would be getting dangerously close to a dating sim. Then again I found it wierd that I could start the story for the Elves leave and complete all other stories then come b
  • Can we bone Morrigan in this one?
  • by SoupGuru (723634) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:06PM (#32841930)
    I'm not a huge RPG kind of gamer but every now and then I get the itch to battle dragons and cast magic so I got Dragon Age. It's really a pretty good game. Long, not terribly repetitive, plot twists to keep it interesting, interesting characters, etc.

    But one thing that really gets to me about these RPGs is all the damned talking. Talk to the bartender, ask him 20 questions, 15 of which are getting at the same thing only worded slightly differently. Interview the bar patron, ask 20 questions, 15 of which rehash what the bartender said. Interview the barmaid, ask 20 questions.... interview the angry drunkard.... move to the next building and interview 5 more people....
    • by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:13PM (#32842046) Homepage

      There are ways around this...Dragon Age (and BioWare games in general) are designed so that if you want to power through them, you can...but if you want to know every little detail about the world, you can do that too.

      The first Mass Effect is a good example. Literally doing everything and talking to everyone I could find took me right around 30 hours.

      My fiancee only extracted the minimum information she needed from each NPC and moved on, and did maybe a handful of side quests. Her total playtime? About 13 hours.

      She enjoyed it just as much as I did, with the only difference being that she knew enough about the Mass Effect world to understand the storyline, while I decided to learn about it on an esoteric level. It all depends on your level of commitment. If you don't want to hear everything an NPC has to say...just don't ask them about it:-)

      • I couldn't "power through" dragon age. I tried. I got about 8 hours into it and didn't want to play it anymore. The combat is too same-y.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      I hate it when I can't go to a towns folk or guard and just ask directions. "Where is the [color]/[Metal] [Animal] inn?"

      I mean, in any major city I've been in, I can ask people and get dome directions.

      Also, dragon Age quest organization is horrible.

    • But one thing that really gets to me about these RPGs is all the damned talking. Talk to the bartender, ask him 20 questions, 15 of which are getting at the same thing only worded slightly differently. Interview the bar patron, ask 20 questions, 15 of which rehash what the bartender said. Interview the barmaid, ask 20 questions.... interview the angry drunkard.... move to the next building and interview 5 more people....

      I don't know if that's meant to be tongue-in-cheek, but come on, there's a reason there's the word "roleplaying" in roleplaying game.

    • You don't want to play RPG's, you want to play action RPG's. Switch Bioware for Blizzard next time.

      What next, complain Gran Turismo has to many cars in it?

      You probably return a porn film with the complaint that people have to much sex in it.

  • by rcb1974 (654474) <richardballantyne.gmail@com> on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:09PM (#32841976) Homepage

    This is exciting. I played Dragon Age for about 3 hours and loved everything but gave up because I got frustrated by the camera, not being able to tilt it from 0 to 90 Degrees and zoom out far enough to see enough of the battlefield. Anyone know if they're going to unlock the camera for us in Dragon Age 2? I would rather have a more flexible camera even if it means setting the graphics to a lower quality setting.

    • by Pojut (1027544) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:16PM (#32842064) Homepage

      ...I take it you didn't play it on the PC? Because you could do the very things you described with the camera in the PC version...

      • by guidryp (702488)

        It was nowhere near as free as the camera in NWN.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        I played it on PC, and I agree with GP. The problem was that when you started to tilt the camera, it quickly snapped into over-the-shoulder view, switching controls accordingly. What I want is something like in NWN, where you could tilt all the way down to horizontal - thus gaining the same sight distance as in first person - but with controls remaining what they are.

        • by Pojut (1027544)

          Ah, ok...I misunderstood what the OP was getting at.

          I agree, that was a bit annoying. Not really a deal-breaker for me, but definitely noticeable.

      • by rcb1974 (654474)

        I was playing it on the PC. I heard camera control was even more restricted on the console versions.

    • by Jaysyn (203771)

      Yeah, the camera & controls on the console version were retarded compared to the PC version.

  • by spiffmastercow (1001386) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:10PM (#32841990)
    Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed DA, but what happened to the ability to do whatever the hell you want (i.e. kill guards, rob houses, etc.) from BG? And what about the awesome multi-player support from NWN? It was the perfect multi-player RPG experience -- you could play with friends, but you didn't have to deal with a bunch of MMO douchebags.
    • by TopherC (412335)

      Even the Baldur's Gate series had multiplayer (even though it wasn't that good). I'd have bought DAO in a heartbeat if it had some kind of LAN-based multiplayer.

    • NWN may have worse graphics and its own share of problems, but if you ask me, it has way more depth.

      • by oji-sama (1151023)
        NWN was indeed very nice, but I loved the side quests of BG2. "Hey, what happened to my party member?" (again)
    • by kellyb9 (954229)
      Call me strange. But sometimes I prefer more linear gameplay over sandbox environments. While I loved games like Oblivion and Red Dead Redemption, it takes FOREVER to travel across the landscape. From time to time, I don't mind playing a game that gives me a little more of a focused storyline.
      • by Pojut (1027544)

        Half-Life 2 is a great example of a game made better by the fact that it's linear.

  • Still hoping for a true successor to NWN.
    • by Jaysyn (203771)

      Me too as long as it's *not* the crappy new 4e rules.

    • by COMON$ (806135)
      I go back a little farther, I am waiting for a true successor to BGII and Icewindale. NWN just didnt cut it for me.
  • by Robotron23 (832528) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:17PM (#32842090) Homepage

    According to Steam's playtime count, I clocked up 106 hours on Dragon Age. Upon hearing the mixed reviews for its expansion (Awakening) I refrained from getting it. As it was informally billed as a successor to the classic Baldur's Gate series I was pretty enthusiastic like a lot of folks who had experience with Shadows of Amn.

    The fact remains that it has only been 9 months since DA released, and the expansion was out 5 months; having not played it I can only echo the commenest gripes of other players which was the relatively short length compared to Dragon Age vanilla (circa 10-15 hours), coupled with a somewhat stilted villain and overall plotline. The characters, most of which are new, haven't endeared themselves as much as the original set featured in DA. My experience with DA was good...but I never saw a villain with the depth or intensity of Irenicus, instead having a faceless entity of orc-like creatures named Darkspawn, with a corrupted Dragon at the helm. The motives of the evil horde were not touched upon much at all in DA...and whilst the characters were a varied bunch I never felt all that engaged thanks to the cropping up of cliches.

    It was a surprise to me when I came across a much less promoted and much more obscure title in the Steam summer sales just a week or so ago. The Witcher expanded edition pulled me in much faster than Dragon Age, with its unusual story steeped in Polish myths - it sure beat DA's rather Lord of the Rings feel that has been done to death not just on the silver screen but to a great extent in gaming too. Despite being inferior in graphics terms to Dragon Age, I found the protagonist pretty refreshing in the same way I liked Clint Eastwood in his most iconic westerns; the medieval world is darker and so suspends disbelief better than the gleaming spires of fantasy I saw in DA. It was less than $10 in the sale too, and offers a very large amount of gameplay. It's even further from Baldur's Gate than DA was, but for what it was it felt much more impressive.

    So after Bioware's content-light expansion, the announcement of a sequel so soon makes me more skeptical than excited. DA was good, but not ground-breaking as most of the perenially bribed gaming press were saying.

    Like any other gamer geek I hope it turns out brilliant, but just like every experienced gamer I've been let down by hyped franchise so many times. With smaller development houses bringing out quality, I start to wonder if there's much point paying all that much attention to the bigger ones with massive capital behind them.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      try Drakensang, Also available on Steam.

      • by Pojut (1027544)

        Seconded. Definitely an awesome game worth playing through. It was wonderfully but unidentifiabley charming.

    • Actually the witcher is not really obscure, it sold over 1 mio copies worldwide, and yes it is very good already a classic. The sequel is in the works and this time they wont reuse the Bioware engine, thank god.
      Cannot wait for the sequel, love the first part, and definitely longer than the 120 hours dragon age which shrank to 15 hours in reality.

    • by hibiki_r (649814)

      The problem that The Witcher had was that, at launch, it was a buggy mess that was almost unplayable in most rigs. The loading times were the worst since good old Sin. It was pretty hard to love.

      Now, after giving the developer enough time to actually finish the game, it's very easy to recommend.

  • At first read I thought this was a new Dragon Quest game. A real one...like Legend if the Cursed King. God I loveed that game. I would happy if it would just be re-released fir modern console(s).
    • What, you don't play DQVIII on your PS3? It could also be said that the console it was made for is a modern console since you can still buy it, new, in stores.

      • by Itninja (937614)
        I don't have PS3 :(
        Hoping that one day the game will come out an another console.
  • by jollyreaper (513215) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:38PM (#32842408)

    I found the game completely unimmersive. I've played a handful of RPG's that I've really, really liked but have not been able to find any in a long time that feel really engaging. I thought that Oblivion was a tremendously varied mixed bag. The engine was beyond amazing, just completely brilliant. I spent hours just wandering around the damn environment gawking at everything. Top notch! But the storytelling was limp and uninspired. And don't even get me started on the mess with leveling. Good game design should be intuitive and the leveling system was anything but. You had to read up and study on how to do it correctly. You run into the same problem with the quests where you might put your game in an unwinnable state by doing something the designers did not anticipate.

    As far as my playthrough of Dragon Age went, the controls were awful, the maps poorly designed, and the storyline was completely unengaging.

    I'm the same way with fighting games. It's not that I dislike the genre -- I love the Dreamcast Soul Caliber -- but so few measure up to that. There's usually just a lot of extraneous fluff and BS and the gameplay itself isn't enjoyable or demands memorizing an endless series of button combos.

    The whole Dragon Age phenomenon I find rather puzzling. Tons of people like it and it's not a Larry the Cable Guy situation where you can explain it as lowest common denominators with no taste. No, people like it for what it is. I like RPG's and it falls flat. It's weird how subjective tastes can be. Here's someone who loves a given genre, let's show him something that's seen as a classic of that genre, let's be puzzled when he dislikes it. Loves scifi but hates Firefly. Loves Thai food but hates curry. Strange.

    • by metamatic (202216) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:50PM (#32842574) Homepage Journal

      I thought that Oblivion was a tremendously varied mixed bag. [...] Good game design should be intuitive and the leveling system was anything but. You had to read up and study on how to do it correctly.

      Not to mention that whenever you leveled up, everything else in the game mysteriously leveled up as well, in a way that was so painfully obvious it totally broke my suspension of disbelief. When the wolves mysteriously turned into timber wolves I realized leveling was pointless.

      I also couldn't get past the fact that Oblivion was accessed by diving into giant flaming vaginas, which took you to a place you knew was evil because there was blood everywhere. Was the game designed entirely by gay men? They should have had an evil demoness called Menses to finish it off.

    • Sounds like we have similar tastes. I really got drawn into Oblivion's world despite the ho-hum storyline, while Dragon Age failed to grab me at all. Perhaps it's the open sandbox-style gameplay of Oblivion that appeals to me... Dragon age felt like I was on rails, like one of those Disneyland rides, which is why I gave it up after a few hours.

      By the way, I'm the same with SciFi and Firefly.
      • Sounds like we have similar tastes. I really got drawn into Oblivion's world despite the ho-hum storyline, while Dragon Age failed to grab me at all. Perhaps it's the open sandbox-style gameplay of Oblivion that appeals to me... Dragon age felt like I was on rails, like one of those Disneyland rides, which is why I gave it up after a few hours.

        It's funny. I was really impressed by GTAIV and found it quite engaging. A friend of mine who loves gaming and greatly enjoyed GTAIII and Vice City found IV to be tedious and boring. While many times we'll be identical with our likes and hates, sometimes we're so far off from each other it's crazy.

        By the way, I'm the same with SciFi and Firefly.

        Any particular reason why? Some people couldn't get past the setting, some couldn't stand the actors, some hated the Joss Whedon dialog. I'm always curious about when someone's feelings about something goes agains

        • With Firefly it was the setting, mostly. It was too western-y for my taste.
          • by lgw (121541)

            Yeah, for me the whole western-y thing just didn't fit somehow. I've liked SciFi western blends elsewhere, but I just never bought into the low tech/high tech thing in Firefly.

    • by hibiki_r (649814)

      For those of us that enjoyed older Bioware games, like KOTOR and Baldur's Gate 2, and saw the company release weaker and weaker games over the years, Dragon Age was a breath of fresh air, a glimmer of hope. It's not a perfect game by any means, but the PC version plays pretty well. The difference between what you want and what I want is very simple: What I find important in a computer RPG is the role-playing. I want fleshed out companions, that interact with me and with each other. I want the world to feel

  • I mean, let's look at the list:

    • MDK 2
    • Baldur's Gate
    • Baldur's Gate 2 (The definitive 2nd Ed. computer game)
    • Neverwinter Nights (3.5 Ed!)
    • Star Wars: KotOR
    • Jade Empire
    • Mass Effect
    • Dragon Age: Origins
    • Mass Effect 2
    • Dragon Age: Origins - Awakenings

    All are truly outstanding games.

    • by Pojut (1027544)

      What about Shattered Steel?

      Also, don't forget about Icewind Dale and Planescape Torment. They weren't made by Bioware, but it utilized their engine.

  • by guidryp (702488) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @01:46PM (#32842532)

    I was a huge Bioware fan. I don't buy a lot of games, but my shelf is dominated by Bioware. BG,BG2,NWN, KOTOR, KOTOR2.

    But Dragon Age was a disappointment for me. It looked pretty but the RPG engine seems light weight and limited. It felt very dumbed down compared to the D&D based system in NWN. Plus the move to selling in game items was a big turn off.

    I won't be looking into DA2.

    I will just keep playing NWN from that better, pre EA era of Bioware.

    • by hibiki_r (649814)

      While the selling of in game items is a bad idea IMO, I'd rather play Dragon Age than NWN any day of the week. The only thing that makes it semi-playable is the custom content: What Bioware shipped in the box was about as lackluster as they get.

      D&D is not set up to work with a team of 2 adventurers, or 3: It requires 4 characters at the very least, and a group of 5 or 6 is far better. Given the dreadful hireling system NWN has, the main campaign was designed to support extremely handicapped groups, whic

      • by guidryp (702488)

        D&D doesn't require any set number of characters. Modules were setup that way in P&P because it was a social game. NWN has rogue moduels, fighter modules, mage modules etc... Open class modules, supplied character modules, there are no limits.

        In CRPGs my preference is actually single character control, not party control. You can play the vast majority of NWN modules with just your single character. That is part of making a unique experience. Play again as any combo of 20+ classes and change the exp

  • I might get excited if they actually care to update their mac version this time. I'm still waiting for 1.0.2, let alone 1.0.3.

    I think I'll pass this time. I'll stick with companies that actually support their software.

    • by richmaine (128733)

      Same here. I went out of my way to show support for the Mac version of Origins. Before realizing that there was to be a Mac version, I had initially bought a PC version, which I ran in BootCamp. Then when the Mac version came out, I bought it too, mostly just to show support for their doing the Mac one. Being able to avoid rebooting into BootCamp was a slight convenience, but not really enough to justify buying a second copy. My main reason was just to show support.

      But I've felt pretty ill-supported in retu

  • First (Score:3, Informative)

    by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @02:04PM (#32842746)

    This time I'll plan on the PC version over the console. The XBox 360 interface on the first DA was horribly hobbled and made the game very frustrating if you're a "I want to control every character's every move" player like me.

    Also, if they bring back the battle scripting, just give me unlimited scripting slots (or some high number I'll never reach). Don't make me expend hard earned development points on opening script slots. Give me scriptable characters or not.

    • by pluther (647209)

      just give me unlimited scripting slots (or some high number I'll never reach). Don't make me expend hard earned development points on opening script slots.

      Hear here!

      Though the slots open automatically as they gain levels, I still can't think of any reason not to have them all available from the beginning.

      "Oh, look, the archmage gained another level. Now I can finally tell her to drink a fucking potion whenever she's about to run out of hit points."

      And why is it that every time I set something on fire,

  • 64-bit support? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by jitterman (987991) on Thursday July 08, 2010 @02:38PM (#32843112)
    I do hope the sequel will support 64-bit platforms. Like most people here, despite some shortcomings I thought the original game was great - all the way until the point where it stopped working on my machine. My PC surpasses the minimum requirements easily, but apparently 64-bit Win7 isn't technically supported. I was able to play up until the point in the game when you enter the town of Redcliffe. At that point, my machine would consistently lock up. Despite all patches being applied and ensuring no background processes were running that would seem likely to interfere, no luck. I contacted Bioware support, who told me to f*ck off as 64-bit OSes were not only not supported, but also that they were not likely to issue a patch in the future to stabilize the title on such systems.

    Did anyone here experience regular lock-ups on Win7 64, and if so, were you able to and how did you solve the issue?
    • by Pojut (1027544)

      I think you might have been encountering a weird one there. My gaming PC, my fiancee's gaming PC, and all of our friends' gaming PCs run Win 7 x64, and none of us had the problems you described.

      We have a variety of hardware, with different brand and model video cards, motherboards, and CPUs...it might be a problem specific to your hardware config. Or the install could have been botched. ::shrug:: sorry

      • by jitterman (987991)
        I think you're likely to be correct. I'm running dual ATIs (can't remember the model at the moment, wanna say 4800) and a quad-core proc (last one released before the "i" lineup). I have reinstalled (and replayed to the lock-up point) but with no luck. Ah well, may actually do an XP dual-boot just to finish the game. Thanks anyway.
        • by Pojut (1027544)

          It MIGHT have something to do with the fact that you are running Crossfire. I don't know if Dragon Age has any problems with Crossfire, but you might want to try either disabling it or physically removing one of the video cards.

    • by hibiki_r (649814)

      What you found is the DREADFUL EA customer support, who can't help in any way.

      I have run DA:Origins on my 64 bit Win7 machine with no problems whatsoever, so I can tell you it does work. But don't expect any support whatsoever: Bioware itself doesn't have their own support desk, and the EA support desk has no interest in fixing your problem, but instead try to get you off their back.

      Why should I buy their games if they won't support me in any way when one of their games fails to run?

    • by Johnno74 (252399)

      I'm sad to hear of your problems, but I doubt if your 64 bit OS is the problem. Yes bioware suck for not supporting your configuration, but unfortunately thats how things work. Most companies have muppets for support people, they aren't experts and they are just following a script for resolving a known set of problems.

      Here at work all our servers are virtualized, except one... because its running an application written by a vendor that will not support running in a virtualized environment.
      We're 100% sure

      • by lgw (121541)

        Back to your issue, An application or game CANNOT lock up the OS. Its not the game's fault, its something the game is doing that is triggering the bug elsewhere.

        That's an uhelpfully pedantic way of looking at it. If I can play N graphic-intensive games with no toruble, but game N+1 make my system lock up, it's a problem with game N+1. Sure, the actual lock-up is coming from the vid card driver, but so what? All vid drivers are full of problems like that, and adequate QA by the game makers would have lead to discovery and work-around.

        It used to be that big-name game releases would be accompanied by a patch release by the vid-card makers, to actually fix the drive

  • Here are a few spoilers, the surrounding will be entirely non interactive with artificial barries placed left and right, and crates as the only means of storing items.
    The story will revolve around something evil to be beaten, and you have to find 4 whatever or unite 4 whatever before the final showdown.
    Ah yes, also expect the first payware DLC about 1 day before the release of the final game, and then another bunch of pointless shoddy additions and 2 hour campaigns all for cash of course one every week.

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