Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Games

Amazon Debuts Multi-Platform Indie Games Store 67

Posted by timothy
from the modern-chaebol-emerge dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Amazon today announced an initiative to help indie game developers promote and sell their games: the Indie Games Store. The dedicated storefront is a new category in Amazon's Digital Video Games Store, designed specifically to help indie games for PC, Mac, and the Web get noticed. The store appears to be US-only, but if you don't live there you should be able to get away with just putting in an American address. Most of the games are Steam downloads, so where you are in the world shouldn't matter too much."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Amazon Debuts Multi-Platform Indie Games Store

Comments Filter:
  • Humble (Score:5, Funny)

    by telchine (719345) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:05PM (#43926379)

    It's like the Humble Bundle but not humble and not a bundle!

    • by slim (1652)

      The first product I became aware of through this service, was a bundle of Double Fine games. Not humble. But a bundle.

      Pretty good too, $9.99 for Brutal Legend, The Cave and a bunch more.

      I already own The Cave, and thoroughly recommend it to anyone who enjoyed Monkey Island, Day of the Tentacle etc.

      • by Enfixed (2423494)
        I second this, The Cave is awesome.
      • The first product I became aware of through this service, was a bundle of Double Fine games. Not humble. But a bundle.

        I take it you missed the recent Humble Bundle last month that had all of Double Fine's games except The Cave, including (if you paid enough) the next one that they haven't released yet?

    • It's like the Humble Bundle but not humble and not a bundle!

      It may not be humble, but the front page clearly lists nine indie game bundles (5 games in each), under a heading "Indie Bundles - 100% of sales to developers".

    • Re:Humble (Score:5, Informative)

      by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968&gmail,com> on Thursday June 06, 2013 @06:19PM (#43930669) Journal

      Personally I think its great and is just one more example of how now that the consoles are all going to online only DRM boxes that PC gaming is the way to go. Thanks to good old fashioned competition there is MUCH better prices, the indie devs get more of a percentage than the consoles, you have a huge choice in places to shop, the hardware has never been cheaper (hell I've built machines that game great for less than $350) and you of course control it, I'd say its just a better experience all around.

      Oh and speaking of Humble they now have weekly sales [humblebundle.com] with big name devs, this week is the entire Serious Sam series so anybody who doesn't have those should check it out.

      • by Xest (935314)

        "Personally I think its great and is just one more example of how now that the consoles are all going to online only DRM boxes that PC gaming is the way to go."

        Why do you pretend PC gaming is any different? Console DRM has always followed PC DRM not led it. It's near impossible to find offline games for the PC now, everything on Steam is activated and installed online, EA, Ubisoft, Blizzard all force you to be online to activate and to play half the time now.

        I'd love it if what you say is true, but it's not

        • by hairyfeet (841228)

          Steam works for 30 days at a time with zero connection, or if you don't want DRM at all there are the Humble Indie bundles, GOG, and several other sites that will be more than happy to sell you a 100% DRM free.

          So unlike the consoles YOU get to choose what is and is not acceptable, whereas the consoles are strictly "my way or the highway". So if you buy a game that clearly says that it has this or that DRM? Again that is YOUR choice and you DO have options, with more and more games added to the DRM free camp

  • I don't see the point. Amazon sells indie games. Steam sells indie games. Once amazon gets you to install steam, why would you use amazon for the next purchase?

    • by Ranbot (2648297)
      Amazon must think there's room in the market for more digital download services than just Steam and Origin, and I think I agree with them. If you consider the trends in gaming towards mobile devices, Amazon/Kindle are in a much better position than Steam to with the growing mobile games market, and if they can convince some people to purchase the next big PC game from them instead of Steam, then all the better.
      • Personally, I don't get why Amazon didn't just make a cross-licensing deal with Steam. That may well be the case here, and given Amazon's support for independent authors, it makes a lot of sense. Though with the money Amazon has, I'm interested in why Amazon didn't try to buy Valve outright. Amazon has done an above average job of allowing their purchased companies a lot of leeway in terms of management, so I think it could be a really good fit.
  • by snarfies (115214) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:06PM (#43926389) Homepage

    I don't buy games with any form of DRM, Steam included. Most of the last few games I've bought have been through the Humble Bundle Store, and not just the bundles - I bought FTL through the store, for example.

    • by wbr1 (2538558)
      Steam is the most unobtrusive DRM I have seen. It comes the closest to what I would call DRM done right. I personally do not have a problem with DRM if it does not get in the way of my enjoyment of the content and does not break other things or spy on my. Steam fits this bill.

      I do have a problem with IP being IP for too long, via excessive patent and copyright laws, but that is a legislative and societal issue, not a DRM or technical one.

      • by Trepidity (597) <.delirium-slashdot. .at. .hackish.org.> on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:39PM (#43926813)

        If you're always online, Steam's DRM is reasonably unobtrusive. But if you regularly use its offline mode, it's a bit of a pain in the ass.

        • by Quirkz (1206400)

          I'd say offline mode has worked well for me most of the time, but a few times it has choked and refused to load the app I wanted. Maybe two or three times out of thirty-ish tries? So not a huge pain, but certainly aggravating when it fails.

        • by Xest (935314)

          It seems to depend partly on the game.

          Defcon just always kept reverting back to trial mode for me when I bought and played it via Steam and I had to reload it each time until it went into licensed mode.

          I've also had games I just couldn't activate for a few days when I tried which was annoying because I always felt there was something distinctly wrong about a third party telling me I couldn't use a product I'd paid for until they got their arse into gear.

          I agree 99% of the time it works fine, but fundamental

  • If they're just re-packaging steam crap, why waste the time and effort? If someone is willing to buy indie games off Steam, they will. Steam is hardly an unknown at this point. And it's no good to anyone who isn't willing to deal with Steam, either.

    So basically, they want to be yet another middle-man.

    • Isn't that what retailers do? I don't think we would want there to be only one retailer of any given type of product.
      • Not usually, no. You don't often see Sweetbay going to Publix and buying up all their store-brand Cheerios to put on their own shelves.

        If they were setting up an ALTERNATIVE to Steam, your comparison might be more apt.

    • by Zerth (26112) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @01:06PM (#43927123)

      Sometimes buying through Amazon to get a Steam license is actually cheaper than buying directly through Steam. I bought the Stronghold series plus Civ V and IV on Amazon, which were all redeemed as Steam licenses, because it was the same price as just the Stronghold series directly on Steam.

      The nice thing about middle-men is that sometimes they fight each other.

      • Okay, I'll admit that I wasn't expecting that. So is Amazon taking the loss, I wonder, or is the publisher dissing Steam by letting them sell the licenses?

        Interesting.

        • by subanark (937286)

          Steam allows the developer to distribute steam keys on their own at no cost (I think not 100% sure though). They can set any price they want too and subcontract out to other agencies. This is different from Apple which charges for every key you distribute on your own. If Amazon and the developer agrees to sell the game at a reduced price when its on special, then Amazon and the developer make money (but maybe the developer lost money by not having steam do the selling). Many developers will sell their game

        • by Oronar (942125)
          Amazon and Greenmangaming buy a ton of keys in bulk. Valve gets money now in a lump sum instead of in individual sales. If they care at all, it's to encourage it.
  • by pecosdave (536896) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:11PM (#43926459) Homepage Journal

    Not indie enough for me, I use Linux. I'll stick with the Humble Bundle, which gives me direct downloads, Ubuntu Software Center and Steam.

    I've been assured by many vendors that once I put Linux on it, it's no longer a PC - so I just shut off my brain and think on those terms.

  • Indie? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by JohnG (93975) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:22PM (#43926615)

    The first five games I see when I go there are from Microsoft, Sega, and Warner Brothers. If that is who us indies are competing with for space in Amazon's indie store, I'm not sure what they are calling it indie.

    • by slim (1652)

      I didn't check past the first two, but Mark of the Ninja and The Cave are both written by indie developers, and published by large publishers.

      Although Double Fine might be getting too big to count; as if Creation was an "indie" record label when Oasis were at peak popularity.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Big corporations have jumped on the "indie" bandwagon and brand their lower-budget games as "indie" for marketing purporses. EA is also one of those who love to do that.

  • on the contrary (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:25PM (#43926651)

    I love steam. It means I can keep my game catalog as I upgrade my machine, switch operating systems, switch platforms... my games are mine. While I can't sell used games, I always try them out non-steam first before I decide I'm going to purchase them. Steam guarantees that I'll have those games available to me no matter what happens to my computer. To me, it's the best DRM out there, and the benefits outweigh my dislike for DRM.

    • Re:on the contrary (Score:4, Insightful)

      by geminidomino (614729) on Thursday June 06, 2013 @12:49PM (#43926897) Journal

      Steam guarantees that I'll have those games available to me no matter what happens to my computer

      Unless you have the unmitigated gall to object to any change they might decide to shove into their TOS. If that's the case, well then fuck you, peasant. Eat it, or kiss your library goodbye.

      Steam is certainly "DRM done right," as so many love to parrot: You do what they say, or they take your games away. That's what DRM is supposed to do, after all.

      • Re:on the contrary (Score:4, Interesting)

        by tlhIngan (30335) <slashdotNO@SPAMworf.net> on Thursday June 06, 2013 @02:28PM (#43928051)

        Steam guarantees that I'll have those games available to me no matter what happens to my computer

        Unless you have the unmitigated gall to object to any change they might decide to shove into their TOS. If that's the case, well then fuck you, peasant. Eat it, or kiss your library goodbye.

        Steam is certainly "DRM done right," as so many love to parrot: You do what they say, or they take your games away. That's what DRM is supposed to do, after all.

        Or a more common case - the game is no longer able to be distributed. I have stuff in my steam library that cannot be downloaded. They don't show up anymore. I can install them from backups (a good idea to backup your library), but if you don't download and back up your library regularly, you can find yourself with the inability to play games you bought.

        Yes, you own the license, but you just cannot reinstall it from Steam via download. You can restore a backup and authorize it against your account, though.

        Anyhow, I did come across something interesting - people were dissing the Xbox One because of the used game fees and saying they're going to get a PC and play on that. Of course, used gaming on PCs is dead since Steam doesn't let you transfer purchases (without account trickery, that is). Which made things interesting - you don't want an xbox because of the used game fees, so you get a PC and buy games new?

        • by Anonymous Coward

          This is the first I've ever heard of this - could you provide some evidence?

          • by gl4ss (559668)

            This is the first I've ever heard of this - could you provide some evidence?

            iirc some bigger title did it last year.. like you have the usual 3 installs, steam or not.

          • by Xest (935314)

            It can happen when a publisher goes bankrupt or gets taken over - Valve may then lose the right to distribute that publisher's games.

            It means that you don't just have to worry about Valve going bust, or changing hands as a risk for losing some or all of your games, but any games company you buy from - if it goes bust or gets sold you could arbitrarily be cut off from ever downloading or playing them again via Steam.

            Of course, they forget to make this clear to you until it actually happens.

    • by Xest (935314)

      "I love steam. It means I can keep my game catalog as I upgrade my machine, switch operating systems, switch platforms... my games are mine. While I can't sell used games, I always try them out non-steam first before I decide I'm going to purchase them. Steam guarantees that I'll have those games available to me no matter what happens to my computer. To me, it's the best DRM out there, and the benefits outweigh my dislike for DRM."

      A long time ago, in an age before Steam, we had these things called CDs, DVDs

      • by ezelkow1 (693205)

        Theres plenty of benefits over physical media, whether these are worth it to you or not is up to the person:

        -no physical media to lose, I cant count the number of games I've lost in moves over the years
        -also no lost keys to go along with the first one
        -no tedious installs, pick all the games you want and let it download/install, when its done everything is ready to go
        -no updating, all updates are handled automatically
        -dlc (if you consider that a benefit, could 50/50 on that one)
        -a built in online community f

        • by Xest (935314)

          "-no physical media to lose, I cant count the number of games I've lost in moves over the years"

          You can lose account details, or even have them hacked (not necessarily on your system) with varying degrees of success in getting them back.

          "-also no lost keys to go along with the first one"

          Irrelevant. You don't need keys in the first place if you don't have DRM. Or if you do have them anyway it doesn't matter if you lose some random key on the net if you lose yours.

          "-no tedious installs, pick all the games you

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Indie used to mean independently created, now it just means "looks like something that a 'quirky' sheepster would enjoy"

  • "The store appears to be US-only, but if you don't live there you should be able to get away with just putting in an American address." So like what Amazon does on their tax form, but in reverse?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 06, 2013 @01:43PM (#43927531)

    It's hardly a multiplatform store when the linux versions of these games are not listed anywhere in sight. What a pointless service.

    • by asjk (569258)
      I feel your pain AC, even if you're being facetious. There is one Mac "game" listed, Second Life. If that isn't a giant middle finger then I'll go spit on Steve's grave ~Praise be the Jobs~.
  • to bad that ios and windows phone are locked into one app store.

    can they make there own Cydia store for ios?

Those who do things in a noble spirit of self-sacrifice are to be avoided at all costs. -- N. Alexander.

Working...