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Can Nintendo Survive Gaming's Brave New World? 277

Posted by Soulskill
from the be-friendlier-to-gamers dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Jon Brodkin talked to indie developers (including the creator of Super Mario Bros. Crossover), former Nintendo employees, and a number of others about where exactly Nintendo went wrong over the past few years. Their conclusions? Nintendo made a number of mistakes, including a lack of an indie-developer ecosystem, a refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android), and platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers. While the developers suggest Nintendo is taking steps to broaden its horizons, such as by reaching out to smaller studios, it's questionable whether such efforts will succeed in a world where the PS4 and Xbox One are about to enter the market, and iOS and Android are swallowing up mobile gamers' time and dollars. What do you think?"
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Can Nintendo Survive Gaming's Brave New World?

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  • smash bros (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Xicor (2738029) on Friday October 25, 2013 @10:58AM (#45234509)
    all they need to do is continue to come out with smash bros. i know a bunch of ppl who buy an entire console just to play that ONE game.
    • by Strawser (22927)

      I bought an xbox just to play GT3. It's a fun enough game that I was willing to throw down the extra bucks for a console and steering wheel just for that game. A lot of people buy a console just because they like one game that runs on it. Kind of a first world problem.

  • Yes, They Can (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rsmith-mac (639075) on Friday October 25, 2013 @10:58AM (#45234521)

    *Looks at Pokemon X/Y sales [polygon.com] and 3DS/2DS sales*

    All signs point to yes. Dying companies don't sell 4 million games in 2 days and millions of consoles in a year.

    • by gorzek (647352)

      Yeah, Nintendo's handheld units print money. The 3DS had a rocky start but it's doing very well now.

      Likewise, I suspect Nintendo will turn the Wii U ship around. It won't be as popular as the Wii--the Wii was a one-time blip that I doubt anyone will repeat--but the Wii U will probably do fine once it has a decent library and gets enough household recognition. I hope Nintendo learned a lesson there: don't launch a console that causes naming confusion and don't launch one without a good set of launch titles!

      • Re:Yes, They Can (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Godai (104143) * on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:09AM (#45234743)

        I agree. The WiiU has been a disappointment, but we're only just *now* seeing the first set of 1st party stuff show up. I rolled my eyes at "refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android)", since that's exactly why they'll survive just fine. Want the new Pokemon? Have to buy a Nintendo system. And they will!

        And the new Mario game is set to show up soon, looks fantastic and should support online co-op finally. I haven't bought a WiiU yet, but that one might tip my hand so I can play Mario with my brother.

        • Unfortunately, for the first time ever, Nintendo was selling a new console at a loss. Which means a single title that sells that platform isn't enough to make a profit anymore. When people bought the wii for wii sports or wii fit, it was a good thing. If people did the same with WiiU, nintendo would go bankrupt.

      • by Holammer (1217422)

        Blaming it on the name... It's a factor but it's not the entire explanation.
        Yes, Nintendo will sell a decent amount of machines whenever they unleash their eagerly awaited first party titles, that's basically Nintendo's own analysis and that's the problem. They're going to sell millions of Zelda/Mario/Kart/Smash Bros, but third party developers get to eat shit and nobody will have the confidence to develop proper games for the system apart from shovelware and some token conversions of 360/PS3 games.
        At this

        • nobody will have the confidence to develop proper games for the system apart from shovelware

          I've seen that 10-letter word tossed around, but nobody appears to be able to agree on a proper definition. (And without a proper definition, discussion goes nowhere [c2.com].) In the early 1990s it meant selling a bunch of demos of indie games on a single CD because they were so small, originally having been developed for floppy or BBS distribution. Now that BBS distribution has grown into a broader paid download market for sale of lower-budget games, I'm not sure from Wikipedia's article [wikipedia.org] what "shovelware" even mea

          • by Holammer (1217422)

            I like the Urban Dictionary definition. It's descriptive and succinct
            "1. Software that is hastily made, without proper testing, and 'shoveled' down consumers throats in order to make some quick cash. "

            We've had them since time immemorial. Indeed, in the past the precursors of LJN sold cheap chess boards made out of clay, straw and cow dung when real developers used hard wood or ivory.

        • by gorzek (647352)

          Blaming it on the name... It's a factor but it's not the entire explanation.

          Good thing I didn't make it the "entire explanation," then.

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        Likewise, I suspect Nintendo will turn the Wii U ship around. It won't be as popular as the Wii--the Wii was a one-time blip that I doubt anyone will repeat--but the Wii U will probably do fine once it has a decent library and gets enough household recognition. I hope Nintendo learned a lesson there: don't launch a console that causes naming confusion and don't launch one without a good set of launch titles!

        Well, the problem with the Wii was third party games practically all sucked. And in recent years, Nin

        • by gorzek (647352)

          I'll note that basically the same thing happened with the 3DS, and then it started to recover after a) a price cut and b) finally having a decent library. Now its sales trajectory is quite healthy. I wouldn't be surprised if the Wii U follows the same pattern.

  • by faragon (789704) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:00AM (#45234561) Homepage
    Except for hardcore gamers, in my opinion there is no reason for "low-performing gaming consoles" when in 2-3 years a mid-priced smartphone with HDMI + bluetooth running Android will reach similar results. They can become a platform-agnostic seal, providing what users want from them: Mario stuff and fun family games.
    • by pla (258480) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:13AM (#45234801) Journal
      Except for hardcore gamers, in my opinion there is no reason for "low-performing gaming consoles" when in 2-3 years a mid-priced smartphone with HDMI + bluetooth running Android will reach similar results.

      You could have said the exact same thing about the PC vs consoles for the past 30 years, and yet, consoles keep on kicking.

      The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

      Ironically, I see modern consoles as their own biggest enemy in that regard - Forced upgrades that break older features, forced online play even for simple single-player games, DRM that (especially for new releases) fails to authenticate the player as often as it works, for-pay premium content in games you've already bought... The console companies have done their damnedest to shift the experience as far as possible away from their one and only edge over general purpose devices: "it just works". Until... It doesn't.
      • by DdJ (10790)

        The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

        I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequatel

        • Let's say you use a succession of Android phones [...] . If it's also extremely cheap...

          I don't see how it'll become "extremely cheap" in Slashdot's home country as long as upgrading from a dumbphone to an Android phone costs hundreds of dollars per year on the major carriers. Verizon and Sprint don't use CSIMs for CDMA2000, instead programming the CDMA2000 subscriber identity directly into the phone. They decline as a standard practice to activate service on a smartphone without an expensive data plan. AT&T is known to cram a data plan onto a voice-only SIM inserted into a smartphone [slashdot.org]. Or

          • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

            or, get an iPod touch. problem solved

            • Or should people buy and carry two phones: a feature phone to make calls on and an Android phone to play games on over Wi-Fi?

              or, get an iPod touch. problem solved

              In that case, how many people are willing to buy and carry a feature phone to make calls on and a 4" tablet to play games on? It'd have to be a brand-new iPod touch, as used ones will probably be fourth-generation and thus unable to use MFi controllers.

              • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                In that case, how many people are willing to buy and carry a feature phone to make calls on and a 4" tablet to play games on?

                the people who don't want to carry two devices can get an iphone. the people who don't want to be locked into an iphone plan can get an ipod touch and two devices. different strokes, different folks.

                people who don't want to carry an iphone or an ipod touch that's fine too, they just wouldn't be able to play this imaginary MFi Nintendo controller & proprietary game system.

                Because the devices are the same size, then any external accessory fits both the same!

          • by DdJ (10790)

            That might work for turn-based games, but real-time games are far more sensitive to latency than the noninteractive movies and television series for which the Chromecast was designed. How much display latency does the Chromecast add?

            Did you try OnLive when it first came out? Have you tried it recently? What exactly is Sony planning for backwards compatibility?

            (We're talking about the future here. The problems you're talking about are getting better. At some point, they'll get better enough that for most

        • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

          The PC didn't kill consoles for the same reason that smartphones won't - People don't want to screw around with variable configurations and unknown levels of performance and controller compatibility. They want a known-working machine such that they can buy a game, put it in, turn it on, and have it work exactly the same way as it did last time, as it does for everyone else, as the manufacturer intended it to work.

          I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequately address that problem.

          Let's say you use a succession of Android phones, and your TV has a ChromeCast attached to it, and some particular bluetooth controller becomes a de-facto standard. The experience begins to approach that of a solid console. If it's also extremely cheap...

          (Would I bet on this? No, not with my own money. But I wouldn't bet against it either.)

          or... just get an iPhone and problem solved.

        • by pla (258480)
          I am less certain than you seem to be that smartphone manufacturers will be unable to adequately address that problem.

          I think that smartphones and tablets could address all of those problems except two: Unknown level of performance (unless they artificially limit their games to a "weakest link" baseline level, in which case that still leaves room for a high-performance dedicated gaming rig to steal the show); and screen resolution, which ranges all the way from HVGA (320x480) to FHD (1080p).

          Will they s
          • by DdJ (10790)

            ... in which case that still leaves room for a high-performance dedicated gaming rig to steal the show...

            As Moore's Law gets to work on "casual" games, I'm not certain that in the long run there will always be a market for "a high-performance dedicated gaming rig" that's big enough for the console industry to cater to.

            My experience has been, the more one is focused on "high-performance gaming", the more one is likely to tolerate the tradeoffs involved in gaming on a general purpose computer instead of a ded

      • by kamapuaa (555446)

        Ironically, I see modern consoles as their own biggest enemy in that regard - Forced upgrades that break older features, forced online play even for simple single-player games, DRM that (especially for new releases) fails to authenticate the player as often as it works, for-pay premium content in games you've already bought... The console companies have done their damnedest to shift the experience as far as possible away from their one and only edge over general purpose devices: "it just works". Until... It

  • by Lumpy (12016) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:00AM (#45234573) Homepage

    Release Mario Kart and other Mario titles on the iPad\Andriod tablet platforms. Even at $29.95 they will sell faster than Apple can make digital copes to send to customers.

    • by P-niiice (1703362)
      i hate everything in the last several years from Nintendo , but would unapologetically buy Mario Kart for my Nexus 7 and love it like a small baby
  • I have a WII, didn't see the need to upgrade to the WII-U. I also have a XBox, had a PS3 but only because I wanted to watch BlueRays. Is it me, or has Nintendo just lagged a bit in terms of graphics? They revolutionized the controllers with the WII, but now I really feel the others have caught up. I do not know if the Nintendo catalog will be enough to keep people with the platform just to play those games. Time will tell.
    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      I have a WII, didn't see the need to upgrade to the WII-U. I also have a XBox, had a PS3 but only because I wanted to watch BlueRays. Is it me, or has Nintendo just lagged a bit in terms of graphics? They revolutionized the controllers with the WII, but now I really feel the others have caught up. I do not know if the Nintendo catalog will be enough to keep people with the platform just to play those games. Time will tell

      It's not you. It's that the Wii was aimed at a different market. When the Wii was relea

  • by MrChom (609572) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:03AM (#45234613) Homepage
    ...because, I mean, cash rich companies with great selling mobile devices, portfolios of valuable IP, and games that sell 4+ million copies in a few days go bust all the time... Just because the WiiU isn't the hottest selling console doesn't mean the 3ds isn't doing utterly stupendous numbers for them.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Then I don't care!

    I bought an original Nintendo to play Super Mario Bros on. Then I bought the SNES for the next Mario/Zelda, then the GameCube to play Mario again and then Zelda Four Swords and 4 GBA's! I bought the Wii for New Super Mario Bros, and again the Wii U for NSMB WiiU (or whatever it is called). Currently I have 1 game for each of those platforms (Wii and Wii U), and its the Mario games!

    As long as they make games that are so fun to multiplayer with my friends I will buy whatever console and g

  • by medv4380 (1604309) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:03AM (#45234617)
    The suggestion that Nintendo should release on iOS and Android would be suicide. The sales figures for the 3DS have already proven the nuts that keep saying Nintendo should release Pokemon the iPhone are insane short term thinkers. Their hand held dominance has yet to be killed. I'll believe Nintendo should start looking at selling on the iCult(Trolling Apple) when Pokemon starts selling less than 1 Million at launch. Since X/Y hit 4 Million I don't think they have to worry about that. Their console market, on the other hand, has been weak since the N64 days. The Wii's success was mostly a fluke caused by MS and Sony raising prices too much, and a couple of gimmicks that were worth some attention by some: motion controls, and wii fit.
    • The WII appealed to women. No joke. I know a lot of guy's girlfriends and wives who hated Nintendos and Sega and Playstations absolutely loved the WII when it came out. Now it didn't last, but largely that demographic are still playing games, but now doing so on Facebook and their phones.

    • by tuffy (10202) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:29AM (#45235079) Homepage Journal

      The Wii's success was mostly a fluke caused by MS and Sony raising prices too much, and a couple of gimmicks that were worth some attention by some: motion controls, and wii fit.

      That was no fluke; it was the logical extension of the same strategy that made the DS so successful after a rocky start. Nintendo built a system with a unique feature (motion control), made new IPs that leveraged that feature (Wii Sports, Wii Fit), targeted the nongamer crowd by offering a pleasant "Mii" aesthetic and offered classic Nintendo franchises for everyone else (Mario Kart). The end result was wildly successful.

      By contrast, the Wii U is bombing because although it also has a unique feature (gamepad), its new IPs are mostly niche titles (Wonderful 101) instead of mainstream ones and the next iterations of Nintendo franchises are either also niche (Pikmon) or late (Wii Sports, Mario Kart).

    • The suggestion that Nintendo should release on iOS and Android would be suicide. ... The Wii's success was mostly a fluke caused by MS and Sony raising prices too much, and a couple of gimmicks that were worth some attention by some: motion controls, and wii fit.

      I agree that releasing outside the Nintendo-sphere would be suicide. Apple's lock-in to high-priced hardware for all their stuff is why they are able to throw in high margins ($600 for a phone that costs $150 in parts) and make money hand over fist.

      I disagree that the Wii's success is a fluke. Lets just look at the first party titles:

      • by P-niiice (1703362)
        it was a success from a sales standpoint - that much is obvious. but I don't regard a console for which it's customers only found a few titles worth purchasing a successful console
        • by tuffy (10202)

          Since over 100 different Wii titles sold over a million units, and the platform sold over 870 million games, customers seem to have found quite a few titles worth purchasing. Though not surprisingly, the top 10 best selling games all came from Nintendo.

          • by P-niiice (1703362)
            Yes, but clearly not enough versus the competition, and they'll have to improve on that or the Wii U will continue to suck. Mix it up, get some better third party support, maybe some more mature IP?
    • by rabtech (223758)

      The suggestion that Nintendo should release on iOS and Android would be suicide. The sales figures for the 3DS have already proven the nuts that keep saying Nintendo should release Pokemon the iPhone are insane short term thinkers

      Total sales worldwide:

      1989 - 2003 GameBoy / Color / Advance / SP: 200 million ~14.2m/yr
      2004 - 2010 Nintendo DS: 153 million ~21.8m/yr
      2011 - Present Nintendo 3DS / XL / 2DS: 32 million ~10.6m/yr

      The GameBoy had a slower ramp up as handheld gaming started getting mainstream traction. Nintendo DS appears to have been the peak. Something happened during its release... around 2007 I think, though I'm having trouble recalling just what was released around then... oh wait, the iPhone followed shortly after by Andro

      • by tuffy (10202)

        My contention is that the market is not large enough to sustain Nintendo's hardware development costs and they will be forced to exit the market after the next handheld system flops (or possibly the system after that). People who think everything is just fine must believe Nintendo can survive on ~2 million/year sales or possibly even less. If they do survive, the systems will be limited to almost entirely Nintendo games with relatively few 3rd party titles due to the small install base.

        This year to date i

  • Mario on iOS (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Rik Sweeney (471717) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:08AM (#45234713) Homepage

    Let's pretend for a moment that Nintendo was to make a Mario game for iOS. Would it be in full 3D like Mario 64, or a classic platformer like Super Mario 3?

    Neither, it'd be an endless runner where you simply tap the screen to jump on Goombas and over gaps, because touch screens lack the control for anything more sophisticated.

    Sure, there are games on the App Store that are fully fledged platformers, but are they any good? No, because (in my experience) your hands are covering 80% of the screen making it impossible to see what's actually going on.

    If this is the future of gaming, you can count me out.

    • touch screens lack the control for anything more sophisticated.

      True. But iOS 7 adds support for external gamepads that clamp onto the iPhone, and even before that, there were controllers that emulate a keyboard. Android has supported USB HID, Xbox 360, and PS3 controllers for a long time, though Android 4.2 and 4.3 broke Wii Remote support. But I'm not so sure people will buy a $40 controller to play a $1 to $6 game. Nintendo could try porting the touch-friendly games it has made in the Mario franchise on the DS, such as March of the Minis.

      • by Newander (255463)

        OK, but once you've attached a decent controller to your phone you've lost the convenience that makes mobile gaming such a force.

    • I will agree that I don't like playing games on the tablet or phone for just the reason you stated. My son on the other hand has an xbox 360 that has primarily been used to watch netflix since all of his gaming is done on either a tablet or android phone. I don't think it is the quality of the games that has caused him to ignore the xbox it is more likely because he can play anywhere anytime {except school} even riding in the car. Add facebook and texting and he pretty much lives on his android phone or the

  • by Millennium (2451) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:13AM (#45234811) Homepage

    HD has made games inherently too expensive to produce. The only things that turn any profit at all are graphics-are-everything reskins of games developed back when it was profitable to focus on things that actually mattered, and those will only sustain the industry for so long. We're headed for another crash, one that Nintendo could have survived a generation ago when it resisted the HD gimmick. Now that it has fallen into that trap, though, it's as hosed as Sony's and Microsoft's gaming divisions will be.

  • Nintendo did not just survive the crash of '83, they were the ones that took the lead in resurrecting the industry.

    Then again, they survived their mid 90's slump. And each time the XBOX/PS war is rekindled on a new generation of systems.

    And even if Wii-U falters, Nintendo can survive on brand recognition alone from the mass of parents in their 30s and 40s that grew up with the NES. Now, perhaps in 10 years when the XBOX/PS generation gamers start having kids of their own, things might change.

  • by wjcofkc (964165) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:21AM (#45234947)
    While I don't think it's reached that point yet, at least Nintendo has plenty of cash to float on. One of Nintendo's bigger issues is that they used to be a trend setter. They don't seem to understand that the landscape is drastically changing and that there is nothing they can do about it other then keep up or fall behind. They are no longer steering the industry, but apparently no one has told them that. Don't get me wrong, I love Nintendo and I want them to continue to succeed.

    As an old timer, I can thing of a console I would paid a couple hundred bucks for: An all in one system that has every game ever made from 8-bit through Game Cube (or at least 64) pre-loaded and ready to be hooked up to my HDTV. I have been wishing for this for a long time.

    BTW - if you have not yet played Super Mario Bros. Crossover, you have not lived until you have played SMB as one of the Contra guys.
  • by DdJ (10790) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:25AM (#45235001) Homepage Journal

    Will Nintendo survive?

    Sure. Remember that they were founded in 1889. They had a business before video games, and if necessary, they'll have a business after video games.

    I think that's where some of their behavior actually comes from. There's a certain level of autonomy that I don't think they're willing to give up, even if that means their video game business tanks.

  • Some basic stats... (Score:3, Informative)

    by TheSimkin (639033) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:27AM (#45235043)
    http://www.vgchartz.com/ [vgchartz.com] Nintendo sold over 4 million copies of Pokemon and 423 thousand 3DS the week of Oct 12. I see no reason to think they are going away any time soon.
  • Nintendo is in an interesting spot, The Wii U is not a great success. The answer is not going to be found by an Xbox 360 owner...the loser of the last generation (arguably a draw with the PS3)

    The answer is not going to be Hardcore gamers (pick your definition of what one is) they never did, they produce great first party titles as the draw...something the article claims is there failure.

    The answer is not going to be making software for the 13% of the smartphone market with an iPhone either!!! (although I wo

    • I don't have exact figures, but I've read that Apple's 13% of activated smartphones account for far more than 13% of the dollars spent on paid applications, especially paid games. This is true especially in the anglosphere, where you don't even have to redub your game's voice acting into multiple languages to get it into Canada, USA, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand.
  • >> indie developers (including the creator of Super Mario Bros. Crossover)

    How is a guy who writes "Super Mario Brothers Crossover" an "independent developer"? Seems like he's a leech on the core brand: Mario and the extended Nintendo world. Furthermore, as long as the core brand is compelling enough and has enough followers to inspire leeches, I don't think it's in any danger of fading away.

  • by J-1000 (869558) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:32AM (#45235103)

    This is a continuation of a chain of events that began when the N64 was released. Whether it was the cart vs CD debate, or whether it was something else, the result was that the majority of third party developers stuck with the Playstation. It's been the same story ever since: Third parties are hard to come by, and Nintendo's first party games are criticized for being too childish. The first Wii was a huge success because it filled a casual gaming need that is now being fulfilled by iPads and phones.

    Nintendo's handhelds seem to do well, perhaps because the same people who talked up the "childish" nature of Nintendo's games were also self-selected out of the handheld gaming audience.

  • Nintendo (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:32AM (#45235109)

    Nintendo made a number of mistakes, including a lack of an indie-developer ecosystem,

    True. Nintendo hardware is very nice. An indie-developer program would attract talent and open the door to great games and a profitable future. They just need to find the right branding, probably something like a "Mario Labs" where the gamers also play the role of 'investors', deciding if projects deserve a grant or deserve to get canned.

    a refusal to license out core properties such as Super Mario to other gaming platforms (or even iOS and Android), and platforms that don't appeal to hardcore gamers.

    False. Core properties (Super Mario, Zelda, et al) are what make a Nintendo console what it is. If you want to play Super Mario, you know what console you need to have in order to play it -- A Nintendo. As soon as Mario makes an appearance on iOS or Android, that's the end of what makes Nintendo special. In essence, they'd become another SEGA; a popular system when I was a teenager, but now just a hit or miss game studio. That's not the road Nintendo wants to go down.

    While the developers suggest Nintendo is taking steps to broaden its horizons, such as by reaching out to smaller studios, it's questionable whether such efforts will succeed in a world where the PS4 and Xbox One are about to enter the market, and iOS and Android are swallowing up mobile gamers' time and dollars.

    Nintendo knows what the other companies don't:
    - $250 entry point
    - Make very reliable hardware, but do NOT make it a loss leader [wikipedia.org]
    - Curate available titles very carefully to ensure maximum revenue

    The gamers looking for the high-end PS4 and Xbox One experience aren't Nintendo's core customers.
    The games playing casual games on iOS and Android aren't Nintendo's core customers either.
    Nintendo should not be the dog who lost his bone to a reflection.
    They know their customer base and they serve them well, which is why they keep making a profit.

  • Game consoles are just stupid bricks that don't evolve. Looking at the speed that the PC industry has evolved it's easy to see that the game consoles are quickly left in the dead behind when it comes to performance.

  • by Jawnn (445279)
    WTF is "brave" about the world of gaming platforms?
  • by gmezero (4448) on Friday October 25, 2013 @11:55AM (#45235523) Homepage

    Here is a response I wrote for Game Zero about the whole "Nintendo is gonna fail" stupidity... back in 2000... still relevant.

    The Future of Console Gaming: Part 2 - The Five Year Plan [gamezero.com]

  • by Alzheimers (467217) on Friday October 25, 2013 @12:20PM (#45235881)

    Nintendo's biggest weakness is clearly their complete distain and disregard for supporting online play. From tedious friend codes, to a lack of headset/mic support, to their stubborn insistence in "going their own way" with an online marketplace, their online/connectivity factor is woefully neglected and abused.

    How can Nintendo make a billion dollars tomorrow? A Pokemon MMO.

    How can Nintendo sell a million Wii U consoles? Give Smash Brothers, Mario Cart, Mario Party, and Starfox the same kind of online matchmaking that you would find in CoD or MoH from any LAST GENERATION console.

    Will they? Who knows. But the market for a console that doesn't extend past the living room is drying up, and while there will always be a dedicated band of single player or local multiplayer based fans eager for whatever remake from ten years ago Nintendo wants to produce, the rest of the market has expanded their horizon beyond the four walls of their living room, and demands their console do the same.

  • I almost exclusively game on my Android smartphone nowadays. My kids mostly use their Android tablets (with occasional DS usage).

    That being said, Nintendo would be idiotic to release "Super Mario Brothers" for Android or iOS. People know that the place to get Nintendo titles (Mario, Zelda, etc) is on a Nintendo system. They will (for the most part) buy a WiiU, 3DS, or 2DS just to get that game. If they release the games on Android/iOS, they become just another Android/iOS developer. Perhaps they would

  • The other two console makers are surviving almost exclusively on FPS games. Eventually that market will saturate and simultatenously the innovations in the games will be so minimal that the profit will start to disappear. Neither Sony nor Microsoft seem to have a plan for what to do when the Halo / Battlefield / Medal of Honor / Call of Duty franchises start to lose their appeal. While Nintendo isn't turning in mega bucks selling these games they do have a much broader pallet of gaming genres making up their title sales.

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