Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Classic Games (Games)

Unearthed E.T. Atari Game Cartridges Score $108K At Auction 62

MojoKid writes: Hundreds of Atari 2600 cartridges of E.T. The Extra Terrestrial that were excavated last year from a landfill in Alamogordo, New Mexico collectively raked in nearly $108,000 through eBay auctions. Some $65,000 of that will go to the city of Alamogordo, while the Tularosa Basin Historical Society will receive over $16,000. Over $26,600 went to shipping fees and other expenses. A team of excavators led by operational consultant Joe Lewandowski unearthed the E.T. cartridges in front of a film crew. The high profile (among gaming historians) dig was the basis a documentary called Atari: Game Over, which is available for free through the Microsoft Store.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Unearthed E.T. Atari Game Cartridges Score $108K At Auction

Comments Filter:
  • They're moving in to a new (to them) building and probably could use the funds.

    I'm a local, unfortunately I was out of town when the dig happened, otherwise I would've been there doing some photography and laughing.
    • How ironic

      Sure, but what people get with this physical game cartridge is a really great story to go with their game.

      Priceless.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Just wait until the high profile dig to unearth the millions of buried Windows ME diskettes. It'll be the basis a documentary called "Microsoft: WTF?!?", which will be available for free through the Google Store

  • ha (Score:4, Funny)

    by nomadic ( 141991 ) <nomadicworld@gma ... m minus language> on Monday August 31, 2015 @08:30AM (#50425609) Homepage
    Funny, people have been talking about excavating those cartridges for at least 15+ years.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 31, 2015 @08:36AM (#50425637)

    ... was the basis a documentary called Atari: Game Over, which is available for free through the Microsoft Store.

    It's also on Netflix, for those that don't know what the Microsoft Store is or even want to know what the Microsoft Store is.

    • Frankly I thought they were making a statement about the game itself by only releasing it on the Microsoft Store.

  • by Dareth ( 47614 ) on Monday August 31, 2015 @08:44AM (#50425679)

    One man's trash is another man's treasure. Though if they actually try playing the game they might rebury the whole lot.

  • by Dan East ( 318230 ) on Monday August 31, 2015 @08:53AM (#50425715) Homepage Journal

    It looks like they unearthed around 1,200 cartridges. Does that mean there isn't any truth to the legend that hundreds of thousands were buried, or is that all they bothered to locate and excavate? After all, if they dug up 100,000+ cartridges, they would flood their own market and they wouldn't sell for as much on ebay, etc.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      ...they would flood their own market and they wouldn't sell for as much on ebay, etc.

      What a hilariously fitting end that would be for one of the games credited with crashing the video game market.

    • It is a great documentary, and it answers your question.
    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      It looks like they unearthed around 1,200 cartridges. Does that mean there isn't any truth to the legend that hundreds of thousands were buried, or is that all they bothered to locate and excavate? After all, if they dug up 100,000+ cartridges, they would flood their own market and they wouldn't sell for as much on ebay, etc.

      There is truth that maybe 100,000 or so were buried there. They were unsold copies and returns. Alongside that though, they found an equal mix of other games, including pong, space inva

      • The documentary tries to show that ET has become known for being a crap game, without many people ever playing it. Many thought the game was too challenging, which does not necessarily equal the game being crap. I have not taken the time to play the game, so I will not call it crap.
      • by ogdenk ( 712300 )

        It gets its rap fro several reasons, being one of the last released games that Atari released.

        Are you smoking crack? Atari had the 7800 after that, the XE Game System, the Lynx and the Jaguar. Atari also had 2 relatively successful lines of computers as well that sold until the early 90's.

        Atari was bought by Tramiel in '84 and some aspects of quality declined but they were still alive and kickin'.

  • Not such a failure NOW, huh, Atari?

  • By the time you include the cost of excavation, the cost of shipping, and all the labor involved from the research, getting permission, filming it, etc... then $108k is peanuts and likely doesn't even cover a fraction of the costs. My guess is that they would be deeply in the red if it wasn't for the film but they have likely made considerably more than the $108k by selling rights to the film.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I recently excavated several Atari cartridges from my closet. I think there's 2 or 3 ETs there and up to a dozen Combat. Offering $100 each for them.

  • $108,000 / 900 = $120 per cartridge

    Assuming $40 price in 1982, after inflation, that is $98.92, so an "investor" would profit about $20 per. That doesn't account for shipping, and assuming his mom let him store them in the basement for free next to his bed.

    Of course you could buy them for a dollar a pound soon after release.

  • I don't care how much they paid for them. The game still sucks!

  • "Atari: Game Over, which is available for free through the Microsoft Store."
    I don't even know what the MS store is. Is that some Win8 App thing? Seriously I've never heard that MS had a store. Anyway, watch it on Netflix.

Swap read error. You lose your mind.

Working...