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Role Playing (Games) Government It's funny.  Laugh. Idle

The NSA's Delightfully D&D-inspired Guide To the Internet (muckrock.com) 43

"The NSA has a well-earned reputation for being one of the tougher agencies to get records out of, making those rare FOIA wins all the sweeter..." according to Muckrock.com, and "the fact that the records in question just so happen to be absolutely insane are just icing on the cake...." v3rgEz writes: In 2007, two NSA employees put together "Untangling the Web," the agency's official guide to scouring the World Wide Web. The 651-page guide cites Borges, Freud, and Ovid -- and that's just in the preface. MuckRock obtained a copy of the guide under an NSA Freedom of Information request, and has a write up of all the guide's amazing best parts.
They're calling it "the weirdest thing you'll read today".
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The NSA's Delightfully D&D-inspired Guide To the Internet

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  • This is brilliant misinformation. If the nsa is average, this is a mindblowimg example of bureaucratic cancer.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I've known a few NSA folks and they tend to be incredibly geeky, smart, and sometimes borderline autistic mathematicians, engineers, and linguists. My guess is that this was written by one of those types who couldn't resist having a bit of fun with it, or it was aimed at fellow geeks who would get a laugh out of an otherwise boring document.

      • Yup. The ones you don't see often are even more so, from what I have heard.
      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        I've known a few NSA folks and they tend to be incredibly geeky, smart, and sometimes borderline autistic mathematicians, engineers, and linguists. My guess is that this was written by one of those types who couldn't resist having a bit of fun with it, or it was aimed at fellow geeks who would get a laugh out of an otherwise boring document.

        The NSA's sole job is basically geekdom. Think about all the work the NSA does - cryptographic, surveillance, analysis, etc. Now realize this work isn't done by managers

    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      The message, hmm, "come work for the NSA and get to browse the internet all day long, every day, we will pay you to, troll, hack and peak into people's private lives, whoot".

      The message they don't want you to see "We will also do it to you, more than everyone else, what you do to others, we will be doing to you". Apparently they now spy more on each other than they do the rest of us and that is now extending country to country spy vs spy style https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]. Hacking into each others l

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      It's the "reverse ninja" rule from movies. One ninja is awesome but if twenty attack the hero they are dealt with in seconds.

      In more real terms the talented people are accompanied by those that got to be their superiors via blatant nepotism and other factors that weaken an org. See the "Star Trek Set" example as to how fucked up things can be at the NSA.

      They are toy soldiers.
  • ÜÑ[TANGLING THE W]Ëß

    I don't mind the unnecessary use of graphemes like umlauts and tildes, but I do find the use of the German sharp s very silly.

    UNTANGLING THE WESS

  • Liberal Arts majors need no longer restrict their job search to McDonald's, Burger King, etc.

  • Repost (Score:5, Informative)

    by tiagosousa ( 1931172 ) on Saturday May 28, 2016 @01:59PM (#52201775) Homepage
    This thing is so old [slashdot.org] that Amazon even sells it [amazon.com].
  • by jeffb (2.718) ( 1189693 ) on Saturday May 28, 2016 @02:04PM (#52201799)

    If MuckRock thinks that's the weirdest thing I'll read today, well, I guess I know one group that hasn't been tracking my browsing habits.

  • Wow. Usually they conceal their bullshit attempts to change public opinion at least slightly.

    This site is part of this propaganda machine and you trust in more than you should.

  • The article uses scans (not even properly levelled, cropped and aligned) even though the document is available in digital form.
    What a bunch of amateurs.

    Maybe they find professionalism in editing as funny as philosophing about the Internet.

    • it's part of the foia redaction protocol. by printing everything, they can take better advantage of the pool of people who've been doing this for decades. apart from maintaining operational security, there is also less room for technical error; no metadata leakage, fewer software bugs, etc. They just need to make sure the black marker completely obliterates the text when re-scanned.

Thus spake the master programmer: "When a program is being tested, it is too late to make design changes." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"

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